/int/ – No shittings during wörktime
„There is no place like home“

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Hide No. 20578 [Reply]
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Old one deda so there is new one.

Found out there is new game in "space horror" genre - what do you think about it? Looks like it inspired by movie gravity and alien isolation game or something
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blOv94g8DwM

There also probably still Morrowind free for 25 TES anniversity in bethesda store, but I don't think anybody care about bethesda store and don't have morrowind from gog or other source already.
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No. 21798
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>>21795
Primitive isn't always easier. Not in every way anyway. A full-fidelity aircraft of WWII-Korea vintage is often much simpler to operate in terms of systems complexity but they are limited in other ways. For example, prop-jobs, due to the laws of physics require rudder inputs to counteract the rotation of the prop. The magnitude of the input is determined by the speed of rotation and it's more of an art than a science. Failing to do it properly and commit it to muscle memory can make flying, let alone fighting a tricky matter, especially landing which is hard enough on a tailwheel when your rudder inputs are good.

Then 1st gen jet fighters seem remarkably simple, no prop to counteract, big wings that make them easy to get in the air and they glide nice and forgiving. All in all they seem like a cakewalk until you actually try and use them on the edge of the envelope where spool-up times make riding the throttle a matter of not letting it get too far down so it can't spin back up quickly if you need it to, and the engines aren't powerful to boot so it's easy to lose all your energy and get dunked on. Then you have the dangerous out-of-envelope characteristics. The MiG-15 for example couldn't exceed ~M0.9 without surface compression rendering controls unresponsive (luring MiGs into a dive that they couldn't recover from was an actual dogfighting tactic in Korea), plus its stall characteristics are unforgiving and due to the low-powered engine, not particularly hard to enter the ballpark of. Unrecoverable spins are definitely possible at lower altitudes because of that.

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No. 21801
>>21795
Main problem is mirroring. I've noticed a really odd tendency in my head to flip things along horizontal axis so even my memories may end up being mirrored like that. I think it hurts my general navigation because sometimes I have to remember to mentally flip something back.
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No. 21802
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>>21801
One of the best ways I've found is a rough mental sketch of your surroundings. That way, I'm not upside down, back to front, but at point X,Y and oriented direction Z. Using the picture from before, mentally I'm thinking of the situation in that moment like this, where I'm the black vector, red and blue are two Flankers that I just killed. Purple is a general area that I'm aware of another pair of hostiles being located and orange is a tussle between allied flights and more bandits that I'm aware of, green being the hill to not crash into and also ground clutter to lose radar tracking in whether that's onboard or missile guidance. Since I keep that picture in mind, I know that if I hear allied missile calls from outside my flight, I'll still want to dump my own countermeasures since I'm presenting rear-aspect on the group that allied forces are engaged with which is perfect for a heater. I'll also want to be keeping an eye portside as I loop starboard. The reason being that going starboard puts me on the beam (without going into radar physics, it makes you harder to track with some radars) of both remaining known hostile areas, letting me reasses the situation with the primary threat being the purple group who are disengaged and not in combat already, so I'll want to make sure to keep an eye out for missile trails.

While I'm not playing the game entirely in my head like that, I'm navigating by keeping a picture in the back of my mind of where I am roughly in relation to various landmarks and points of interest instead of just going moment by moment. Multitasking basically. That's also the basis of navigation by bullseye which is a landmark chosen before an operation that calls are referenced by so that intercepted transmissions aren't legible. BRA: Bearing, Range, Altitude, so a call of

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No. 21809
So how exactly do I play Witcher 2? I'm dumb and I'm lazy. The controls are out of whack but luckily I've already forgotten how to use controls in Witcher so no more fighting against my instincts at least. The whole system seems pretty bizarre as a change. Like now not only I can't ingest potions during battle, but I actually have to actively find a place to meditate to use them? What weirdness is this? It also seems I do a LOT faster now.

Hide No. 21775 [Reply]
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No. 21791 Kontra
>>21775

We have a cinema thread
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No. 21794
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>>21777
>Always Outnumbered Always Outgunned
I saw this in the B-Movie thread. It was like watching everyday life, if everyday life had neatly intertwined vignettes and a discernable narrative arc. If you're looking for a movie that isn't about saving the world, or teens rebuilding the rec center, this is a good one.
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No. 21807
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>>21787
It's a movie link and movie history thread, for people who want to watch low budget b-movies from 20-40 years ago. The pictures are there to remind the person of the movie if they've seen it before. So what are you talking about

>>21783
When I have amassed working links to dozens movies and their images I'll do just that. As I only had a few and wanted to demonstrate what the thread was about so they good contribute similar content I made separate posts but all minutes from eachother when the board wasn't active. Delete your post and get out of the thread

>>21791
This isn't a cinema thread. It's about an unpopular genre of cheap action movies mostly made between 1986 and 1998
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No. 21808 Kontra
>>21807
You just want to shitpost. Is this RAC? Because this is the third thread you've made on this exact specific topic. Just put the damn links in one clean post with 4 pics. There's literally no reason for you to do this unless you want attention.

Hide No. 21175 [Reply]
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Last on is on autokontra
Blogpost away!
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No. 21803
I'm seriously considering not going in tomorrow. (Not having bought a bus pass is a good enough reason, because I don't God damn plan on getting up even earlier to buy one, but oh well, I'll probably do so.)

Must be the weather, though I'm not fond of the possibility that the weather might influence me this drastically. That's for old people and women.

Still haven't studied jack for my test about rhetoric. I managed to read a whooping 10 sentences before getting up and starting to browse my bookshelf. I ended up reading aloud from random epics like the Odyssey, Mahabharata and the Nibelungenlied.
It's around 4 small pages' worth of material, but fuck, I just can't get myself to deal with it. It's horrible.

And I also have an upcoming test on French symbolist poetry. The gayest fucking shit on Earth. It's bullshit, and I don't even have the materials for it. (So of course I'm going to have to ask around, but fuck, I'm just not interested in this.)
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No. 21804
>>21803
>French symbolist poetry.

Baudelaire is good, aestheticism in general. You liked Der Tor und der Tod which is from that style. Romanticism is the core for that kind of poetry.
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No. 21805
>>21793
Blender 2.8 has a realtime renderer that makes offline render times almost a thing of the past.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxrwx7nmS5A
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No. 21806
>>21789
>Bydgoszcz in Germany is not Bromberg
That should be better fixed.

Hide No. 21800 [Reply]
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I dont know where to put this and I guess history thread is on systemkontra
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HJ56MYa9W8M
Video is about Russia getting smaller. But my question is, do you think Russia's collapse in early 90s would not have happened if they didn't lose a massive amount of their population? Do you think it was ultimately generational population shocks that killed USSR?
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No. 21810 Kontra
>>21800
>systemkontra
Are you shure? I think it's not bumped for long time just
>video
I already know from what channel it is. It's very dumb channel for hypernormies who tells facts like "sun is hot" and often incorrect thing
>actual topic
This is politics, not a history. Everything disscution about post-ussr russia will 100% end in heavy politics territory. And current crisis of russia as country is main political theme today inside of russia.

Hide No. 16419 [Reply]
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Old one is kontra.
What are you reading, Ernst?
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No. 21761
>>21759
>>I don’t watch movies for whatever reason. Never did.
>Adding that to your literary tastes and attitudes it's not a far-fetched observation I think. 

It's the same for me tbh. Got several cinephile friends who pretty much told me fuck all about Herzog, Tarkovsky, Bergman, Leone, Kubrick, Lynch and who not but I didn't watch a single movie from all of those. I only ever watch movies when friends take me with them to cinema or want to watch a movie at home and I join them. I feel rather trapped when watching movies. I think Benjamin wrote that while a literary work changes his form by the reader and whatever is happening happens due to his imagination, the perception in movies is always the same. Nero in Quo Vadis? will always look like Peter Ustinov and his songs will always sound the same, no matter who watches it.
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No. 21764
>>21753
Bright Lights, Big City by Jay McInerney. Didn't like it much personally, but it wasn't awful, so you might try it. It's also just a little teeny-tiny bit experimental: it's written in second person.
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No. 21786
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>>21761
I'd agree that the imagination is restricted with films, yet they can appeal aesthetically different to you than a book does.

>and his songs will always sound the same, no matter who watches it.

You could say that a book always looks and reads the same, reception of films is also different from person to person.

>>21759
Thought about Ellis some years ago but never bought Less than Zero, I have a DeLillo book here after watching this movie with the limousine driving thru New York. Ballard is British and not sure if he wrote it with actual USA impressions in his back.

Reading Ästhetik des Erscheinens by Martin Seel atm. It's an aesthetic of presence more or less. An Object/Event or their multiplicities erscheinen in your aesthetic preception in their manifold being, they are unbestimmbar in the end, the rational/propositional perception is able to bestimmen but an endless move that never grasps the whole thing in itself but only fragements whereas the aestethical perception and recognition does grasp it always as a whole. Art and aesthetical perception of an object or event in general is an enhanced attention for your own presence. Thanks to aesthetical imagination you can also make non existent objects or events (from the past or future or never existing at all) present. So your flashes from childhood while being at the sea count as aesthetical perception and imagination at once.

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No. 21799
>>21761
Eh, I mean whatever floats your boat, but I think it's rather silly to invoke Benjamin who barely witnessed what film is capable of during his lifetime as an authority on film. Cinema, then TV, now streaming have been arguably the most important medium of the 20th century so I think some further critical engagement wouldn't hurt.

>>21786
Less Than Zero should definitely be a great starting point IMO.

>Ballard is British and not sure if he wrote it with actual USA impressions in his back.
You're right of course. I guess there is nothing specifically USA about it, but neither is it particularly British I'd say (though it supposedly takes place in the outskirts of London). Maybe it's a bit of a stretch, but I'd say High-Rise (and afaict some of his other works as well) deals with the sort of decaying, detached Zeitgeist of 70s-80s globalized culture that America can be taken as an epitome of. At least that's my explanation of why I'd associate it with that.

Hide No. 15089 [Reply]
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Let's talk about kino

Old thread: >>44
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No. 21750 Kontra
>>21734

zooqle(.)com
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No. 21751
>>21742
Also wanted to suggest, but I think it has no english dub there.
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No. 21788
>>21019
Did you end up watching it? I still haven't XD
>>21058
lol
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No. 21797
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Pretty eerie low-budget Japanese horror by Ju-On/The Grudge and written by none other than Chiaki J Konaka (Serial Experiments Lain, Texhnolyze etc.) loosely based on The Shaver Mystery stories.
The main character played by Shinya Tsukamoto is a middle-aged cameraman who gets lost in the depths of his mind, madness and a subterranean city below Tokyo. There's no point in spoiling the story since the movie relies on the viewer trying to interpret what happens, but it has some interesting stylistic aspects, such as the movie containing few scenes with dialogue, instead being commented through the nondescript mumbling of the main character.
It's definitely interesting conceptually as it's one of few movies I've watched so far that manage to translate the deep horror of e.g. Lovecraft or Junji Ito onto the screen, all the while being on a shoestring budget (maybe that's actually the trick)

Hide No. 16306 [Reply]
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Old one systemkontra'd
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No. 21739
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Nothing could be more emblematic of the Anglosphere’s success in this post-globalization world than the spread of Rock’n’Roll. With minor exception, almost every industrialized nation is home to dozens of active and recording Rock bands supported by thousands of fans spanning all ages. As each nation would interpret the music differently and develop local analogues to more popular bands, politics (local and global) would find their way through Rock’n’Roll. While the vast majority of active recording artists come from apolitical, liberal or leftist persuasions, it comes as no surprise that others on the further fringes sang from an entirely different hymn sheet: Nationalism.

Perhaps France’s earliest known Nationalist Rock musician is Jack Marchal, famous for forming the student activist block Groupe Union Défense along with Alain Robert and four others at Panthéon-Assas University in Paris. After enough hours covering Rolling Stones with close friend Olivier Carré, Jack would team up with Italy’s Mario Ladich, best known for his leading role in the MSI-affiliated act Janus, to record Science & Violence, an album that could roughly be described as the right-wing analogue to Syd Barrett-era Pink Floyd.

As distribution of such music proved difficult, Nationalist Rock would stay in obscurity until the White Nationalist skinhead movement took the Anglosphere and Western Europe by storm. For better or worse, skinheads bequeathed Nationalist Rock with the much needed edge previous iterations sorely lacked, but with that edge came years of controversy that would plague Nationalist movements. With the cultural clout shifting leftwards in no small part due to increasing Americanization along with the long march through the institutions across Western Europe, young artists would be faced with the choice to co-opt this revolutionary genre or lose the culture war to the rising tide of leftism and new laws stymieing their firmly rooted convictions.

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No. 21740 Kontra
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Mon clan et les miens

Brixia’s first five songs would appear on an EP titled Mon clan et les miens. The songs’ collective emphasis on atmosphere brings the listener on a contemplative journey where man reflects on his alienation from the modern world before rebelling against the very source of dispossession. Drum machines and synths set the beat while the guitars alternate between acoustic flourishes and hard riffs that ring out. Everything here is smooth and even-keel. Aude’s soft timbre reminisces of a timid being in search of meaning, but her talents really shine whenever she sings out. Recorded on a limited budget, the production values underscore the musicians’ collective grasp beyond their reach, but with humble means yields a passion that refuses to be extinguished by convention.

Written in Aude’s teens while at Brittany, “Littoral celte” expresses one’s aspirations towards the infinite through dreamy synths, brittle guitars and ethereal imagery capturing the fog and spirit of her nation’s ancestors while solemnly contemplating one’s mortality. Our singer gently entrances the listener, transporting them to the Celtic coastline where man maintains his blood ties while aspiring towards the ideal. The blend of somber moods with spiritual musings fit the opening track.

In contrast comes the uptempo “Tenez bon on arrive” featuring some sharp guitars propelling the song. The lyrics beseech the listener to stand firm in their convictions and reject defeatism as fiercely as the corrosive media complex. It is here that we see Aude come out of her shell and sing with confidence. Towards the end the guitars indulge in some wah-wah soloing that is neither here nor there. Mixing here was critical, because her friends’ attempts to join in on the second chorus are undermined by their volume being set too low.

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No. 21741 Kontra
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Monde de timbrés + Sur les terres du RIF - Acte II

1999 was a busy time for Aude Bertrand. After recording and releasing her first EP as Brixia, she would perform a benefit concert in Belgrade on April 5th during the height of NATO’s bombing campaign with fellow French Identitarian band In Memoriam and her husband’s Rap group Basic Celtos.

The event occurred in the evening near the Prince Mihailo Monument to an audience of what appears to be nearly 100. Aude would later reflect on that night in awe of the warm reception. Amid all the attendees showering the stage with flowers and crying tears of joy, she asserted her unconditional support for the Serbian people in face of bombardments that ended in June of that year.

Upon returning home, Brixia hit the studios again to record the sophomore Monde de timbrés. The smooth Virginie Deleuvre returns on guitar contrasted by the hard rocking Charles Schlivovitz who replaced Jack and Julien. On bass came a gentleman only known as Guillaume who does a serviceable job during his time on record. This new line-up would add some new instrumental sensibilities while keeping the core themes intact.

Both the debut and sophomore releases’ song structures owe a fair share to Dream Pop as well as anything traditionally Rock-based despite the latter still being front and center. Indeed, the cold beats from the artificial percussion sounds more at home on an EDM record. Most importantly, the shared electric and acoustic guitar work serve to layer the atmosphere in heightening the listening experience. The music emphasizes mellow and serene soundscapes even at its quirkiest moments. The acoustic flourishes imbue the sound with the much needed organic tone demanded by the subject matter. Aude’s vocal capabilities shine on downtempo tracks where she muses autobiographically in a neutral Alto octave that stays comfortably in the middle register, neither undersinging nor oversinging.

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No. 21782
>>21643
>I'm unclear are you saying you've been around both groups and that SoCal recent immigrants are the dumber ones?
Yes. The dumb Armenian thing is a product of SoCal trash like the Kardashians. Recent Armenian immigrants are literally just sovoks who speak Armenian in addition to Russian (except for a small minority who come from Iran, but I've only met one so I can't generalize about them), whereas older Armenian immigrants are basically mountain jews.

Hide No. 11536 [Reply]
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Why didn't we have this one yet?
Well, post what you're cooking/eating, discuss food and its culture in general and we may talk about diets as well if you want to.

I'm not a big cook myself but once in a blue moon I like to do it if the process is not too hard or needs too much time. I think the last time I actually cooked something was a south-western inspired casserole, it was extremely fatty because of the massive amount of molten cheese and I felt bad after eating it.
Today I found some older frozen asian vegetables in my freezer and cooked them together with some frozen sugar bean pods and some curry powder, I never thought cooked vegetables without any meat or carbs could taste so well.
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No. 21738
Has anyone here cooked phở before?

I usually prepare my broth with sweet onions, garlic, loads of ginger, star anise, salt, fish oil, shank and knuckle bones. I then add a toasted spice mix of fresh ground coriander seeds, cinnamon, clove, fennel, cardamom and peppercorns. After letting all those essentials boil then simmer for 10 hours, I then strain out all the fat and spent parts before adding bánh canh or Udon noodles and boiling until soft before adding thin-sliced sirloin.

I can never eat the amount prepared in one sitting, so I usually have tons of leftovers. One problem I have is that the broth always congeals into a thick gelatinous substance upon refrigeration that never turns liquid ever after five minutes in the microwave.

What tips do you have to render the broth soupy again? I've done some cursory research and apparently others hyperboil their broth initially before straining then reboiling and simmering. Any/all help sincerely appreciated.
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No. 21756
>>21738
Add water and boil it in a pan.
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No. 21763
>>21756
the white bits of fat never really disappear, filter it is you must, but taste wise it isn't going to make a difference.
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No. 21765
>>21763
I'd assumed he left too much cartilage in. Idk what knuckle bones are but it sounds like something similar to aspic happened. The problem isnt just the fats but the cartilage. Fuck meat stuff is disgusting. Like the more I think about what I'm saying the more disgusted I become.

Hide No. 18963 Systemkontra [Reply]
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Huawei founder made some pretty confident declarations about his company and USA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ju1epxXUPkQ
>America doesn't represent the world
>no way the US can crush us
Reminder that his daughter is under arrest in Canada.
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No. 21766
>>21760
Goddamnit Poland

Well to be fair, they started it and by they I mean the faggot Likudnik Israelis decided to start bothering us for money then have the audacity to repeat the "Polish death camp" lie so fuck them go bother Germany.
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No. 21770
>>21760
>>21766
It's an old local tradition, they're burning Judas who betrayed Jesus, not a random jew. It's not the first time Americans are butthurt about it.
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No. 21784
>>21770
Why did you dress him up to look like a European rabbi then?
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No. 21792
>>21770

Burning Marzanna/Morana like in this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xG0yuWTaQKo

is an old, probably pagan, slavic custom. Burning a jew dummy is not.

Hide No. 6267 [Reply]
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There is a thread asking about German grammar, but why not make a languages general?

Why aren't you learning a language in your free time? Go for it, it's a good use of time. In a couple of years, you'll have an interesting skill.

I'm currently learning Russian, it's a horrible language crafted by Satan himself. Cyrillic is bad, but cursive cyrillic is just sadistic, it is no wonder that so many people resisted attempts at Russification.

https://www.livelingua.com/course/fsi/Russian_FAST_Course

Here is a link if anyone wants to suffer alongside me with Russian.

C'mon Ernst, learn a language!
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No. 21729
>>21717
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=abILFNRyU24
Bathe sounds like lathe
Bath sounds like thing
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No. 21737
>>21713
From memory they were interchangeable back in Old English too. You just didn't use eth at the beginning of a word for whatever reason. I mean, I'm all for bringing back Anglo-Saxon Latin as the alphabet, but it was only slightly less odd than the one we have now.
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No. 21752 Kontra
>>21729

Literally the same, just a slightly different vocal before the "th"

(And they showed that Americans can't even pronounce English vocals correctly.)
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No. 21785 Kontra
>>21752
That's literally the same as saying that z and s are literally the same. Just because your barbarian ears can't hear the distinction doesn't mean it isn't there.