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No. 10070
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do u like classical music, and if yes, which types? do you attend live concerts? with what frequency?
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No. 10072
I wouldn't know where to start. I can kind of read sheet music from childhood trumpet lessons but I'm not classically trained in anything.
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No. 10073
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There can be only worse music made than Mahler's.
Peak romanticism.
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No. 10075
Yes, but only to the point that i can enjoy it and usually not so much that i decide to listen to it instead of something else.
But very rarely it happens that i want to listen to some harpsichord music. I really like that instrument.

If i had to name a favorite composer.. maybe Händel?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWzUdGNa46I
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No. 10077
Not much compared to other music, but sometimes. Mostly the earlier types of classic music still Renaissance influenced, or later
classical music from the late 19th and early 20th century, as for instance Saint-Saëns, Kabalevsky, Prokofiev, Mussorgsky.

Barely listen ever to the "classic" classics like Mozart, Beethoven, Bach, Verdi etc.
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No. 10082
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I rarely listen to it.

This one is from the 1970s, a dutch composer

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8c4CbWJuFIM

>Ten Holt generally used consonant, tonal materials and his works are organized in numerous cells, made up of a few measures each, which are repeated ad libitum according to the player's preference. Many of his works are for piano or ensembles of multiple pianos. His most famous work is Canto Ostinato, which he wrote in 1976 and is considered one of the most famous works in contemporary classical Dutch music history.

His other works can be enjoyed in a similar manner.
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No. 10083
>>10082
Oh I want to add, the piano is my most favorite classical instrument, nothing compares to it sound.

If some Ernst can suggest me other, perhaps niche pieces like I think Ten Holt is, I would give it a try. Couldn't be bad to dive into it.
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No. 10089
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No. 10092
>>10089
Not uninteresting, but niche does not necessarily mean obscure. Bartok is very dissonant, which can be good I have to think of 70s and 80s giallo movie soundtracks and has its artistic right to exist. It's not as bad as Schönberg :DDD
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No. 10093
>>10092
Well, Bartók isn't exactly remembered because he produced outstanding music himself, but rather because he went around the historical areas of Hungary and collected folk songs, in both recorded and written form. He did this alongside his partner Zoltán Kodály. I think he also composed for piano, but I'm not sure about that.
Kodály is remembered more for his work as a pedagogue. Funny thing is, the communist government asked him to compose a new anthem in place of the one used since the 1840s and he plainly refused saying "It's don't", because it's too iconic to be replaced.
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No. 10130
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>>10073
Oh, Mahlers sixth was my favourite piece for some time.
Lately I feel more drawn towards Bach in one direction (admiration) and Dvorak in the other direction (awe).

Right now Dvoraks Brave New World is probably my favourite, followed by Liszts Hungarian Rhapsody and Tchaikovskys Slavic Marsh. But those are famous pieces and you guys will already know them wenn enough.
Instead, let me recommend two other pieces that are far less known (such as all latin american music, apparently...) but have given me warm feels for many years now:

Aldemaro Romero - Fuga Con Pajarillo
Arturo Marquez - Danzon No. 2
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No. 10131 Kontra
>>10130
*well enough

Also: It would be nice if we could upload FLAC here, or at least Opus instead of vorbis.
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No. 10136
>>10131
Not a problem.
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No. 10146
>>10136
Oh that's brilliant, thank you <3
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No. 10149
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No. 10171
>>10136
why the fuck did you ban me, it was just a cock picture
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No. 10172 Kontra
>>10171
There's a time and a place for cock pictures and that place is not here.
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No. 10173
>>10172
u should eat poo
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No. 10174 Kontra
>>10173
Why?
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No. 10177 Kontra
>>10173
Judging by how you followed blatant shitposting by using ban evasion to whine about it followed immediately by shitposting, I'd say not only that ban was severely justified, but you should be banned again :-DDD

This is not a shithole like cabbagechan please fuck off back there if you don't like it :--DDDDD

>>10070
Nothing more interesting than bordello opera like Carmina Burana and the usual stuff everybody knows. I guess it was Leningrad #7 but I could've sworn Bernstein conducted a Stalingrad symphony that I kinda liked.
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No. 10187
>>10177
Could it have been Shostakovich?
https://youtu.be/BkSQywSz770
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No. 10190 Kontra
Also, why isn't this thread in the music general?
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No. 10197
>>10187
YES! I think that's it

Actually oddly enough I specifically remembered 7th symphony in Stalingrad, as something written during the siege, but apparently it was written during the siege of Leningrad
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vRHZu5xoIe0

Anyway yours sounds like what I was remembering strangely.

How do you know so much about Russia anyway? I keep seeing it from you and just assumed you were some kind of Russiaboo, but the depth of your Russiabooism is pretty amazing.
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No. 10209
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>How do you know so much about Russia anyway? I keep seeing it from you and just assumed you were some kind of Russiaboo, but the depth of your Russiabooism is pretty amazing.

When a nation triggers my autism, I obsess over it. I consider myself a Russiaboo. Disclaimer: I do not in any way believe that Russia is a good country, I am merely deeply interested in Russia and its history I particularly like Shostakovich's works, though.

Also the jazz album is really good:
https://youtu.be/CDSeqqEN9Rg

Also Shostakovich's wikipedia page is a nice read, what a wild life in the Soviet Union when the upper brass specifically decides to fuck with you.

>Equally horrifying was the way Stalin and his companions laughed at the love-making scene between Sergei and Katerina. The next day, Shostakovich left for Arhangelsk, and was there when he heard on 28 January that Pravda had published a tirade entitled Muddle Instead of Music, complaining that the opera was a "deliberately dissonant, muddled stream of sounds...(that) quacks, hoots, pants and gasps."[19] This was the signal for a nationwide campaign, during which even Soviet music critics who had praised the opera were forced to recant in print, saying they "failed to detect the shortcomings of Lady Macbeth as pointed out by Pravda".[20]

>On 6 February, Shostakovich was again attacked in Pravda, this time for his light comic ballet, The Limpid Stream, which was denounced because "it jangles and expresses nothing" and did not give an accurate picture of peasant life on the collective farm.[22] Fearful that he was about to be arrested, Shostakovich secured an appointment with the Chairman of the USSR State Committee on Culture, Platon Kerzhentsev, who reported to Stalin and Molotov that he had instructed the composer to "reject formalist errors and in his art attain something that could be understood by the broad masses", and that Shostakovich had admitted being in the wrong and had asked for a meeting with Stalin, which was not granted.[23]

Shostakovich later was in Leningrad during the siege, and suffered whilst fighting in the firefighting brigades. His works on it were also viciously attacked:

>The family moved to Moscow in spring 1943. At the time of the Eighth Symphony's premiere, the tide had turned for the Red Army. As a consequence, the public, and most importantly the authorities, wanted another triumphant piece from the composer. Instead, they got the Eighth Symphony, perhaps the ultimate in sombre and violent expression within Shostakovich's output. In order to preserve the image of Shostakovich (a vital bridge to the people of the Union and to the West), the government assigned the name "Stalingrad" to the symphony, giving it the appearance of a mourning of the dead in the bloody Battle of Stalingrad. However, the symphony did not escape criticism. Its composer is reported to have said: "When the Eighth was performed, it was openly declared counter-revolutionary and anti-Soviet. They said, 'Why did Shostakovich write an optimistic symphony at the beginning of the war and a tragic one now? At the beginning we were retreating and now we're attacking, destroying the Fascists. And Shostakovich is acting tragic, that means he's on the side of the fascists.'"[35] The work was unofficially but effectively banned until 1956.[36]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dmitri_Shostakovich

There's a lot more of it in the link, it's really wild how deep his life was ruined and his existence tortured for no good reason.
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No. 10211
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>>10209
> Stalin and Molotov that he had instructed the composer to "reject formalist errors and in his art attain something that could be understood by the broad masses", and that Shostakovich had admitted being in the wrong and had asked for a meeting with Stalin, which was not granted.[23]
This is by far the worst or maybe sometimes best part of deranged sociopathic possibly autistic dictators. They almost always seem to obsess over the arts. Stalin himself was apparently an avid fan of the arts, be it music, painting, film, whathaveyou, and specifically hated and rejected "formalism" and things like Cubism.

Which, on the other hand, would actually be quite nice to have an iron fist to rule if only to ruthlessly force people to not make complete shit. Imagine if you could have reforms of the music and movie industries in America, forcefully purging all that fucking consumerist garbage and forcing people to be innovative and high brow so as to stimulate and elevate the great masses of the proletariet without engaging in regressive, degenerative money grubbing. Imagine if you could round up all the EA executives and have them either shot or sent into permanent exile to work in textile mills. Imagine if every blithering BP executive who fucks up your goddamn shoreline instead of having your politicians kiss the ass of a foreigner literally physically ruining your country if you could have him personally pay for clean up or have him shot. Imagine if you could order a ruthless purge of Activision Blizzard and EA and rehabilitate the great heroes of Bullfrog, Pandemic, Westwood, Bioware, and Interplay. Imagine if you could halt the great crapflood of capeshit, and force Michael Bay to create psychological horror thrillers, real or simulated.
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No. 10213
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>>10211
>Which, on the other hand, would actually be quite nice to have an iron fist to rule if only to ruthlessly force people to not make complete shit. Imagine if you could have reforms of the music and movie industries in America, forcefully purging all that fucking consumerist garbage and forcing people to be innovative and high brow so as to stimulate and elevate the great masses of the proletariet without engaging in regressive, degenerative money grubbing.

I don't know if I'd do anything, I think the resulting media from a truly lassez-faire system without any check of "morality" or state action is a sight to behold. These are all things that touch on the lowest common deminator, and go through a darwinistic process in which only the lowest forms of art survive. I see it as extremely interesting that this is where socities with the most decentralized choice and less forces holding back the range of consumer choice. Be they a logistical one, or societal norms.

It really is a brave new world with regards to mass media, as more and more niche groups are enabled to be formed, and thus the majority (or at least the largest minority) of media pieces are so bizarre. They are truly the creation of a hyper competitive market trying to create the most attention grabbing garbage that can suck in larges swathes of the population.

If I had any real power, I'd let the show go on, accelerate the process by removing any possible checks and balances on this. Particularly the government subsidization of certain forms of art and study the outcome.
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No. 10232
>>10213
That is only interesting if you are romanticising human decisionmaking.
As you say it's all about attention-grabbig. The more effective the process becomes the less attention people will have for anything but extrinsic stimuli, which in turn leads to all kinds of psychological suffering.
This attention economy is the worst weapon of mass destruction we've come up with yet. Mark my words, I actually think I'm right on this. What is being constructed is a society of anti-mindfulness.
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No. 10245
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>>10211
Always new that "faggots with elephant in the gut" are somehow tied to hitler.
>Stalin himself was apparently an avid fan of the arts, be it music, painting, film, whathaveyou, and specifically hated and rejected "formalism" and things like Cubism.
Soviets had this cult of realism and monumentalism. But actually by censorship they made symbolism and metaphorical art more valuable and popular. But this comes from lenin and marks. Stalin himself loved musicals, pop culture and jazz.
>Imagine if you could have reforms of the music and movie industries in America, forcefully purging all that fucking consumerist garbage and forcing people to be innovative and high brow so as to stimulate and elevate the great masses of the proletariet without engaging in regressive, degenerative money grubbing.
You see, America is nothing without it's popular culture. And your economy is nothing without it. So unless you want to know how bread with salt can be delicious, you should face the reality and accept it.
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No. 10253
>>10245
Comrade I will eat tree bark if it means the rehabilitation of our culture
>America is nothing without it's popular culture. And your economy is nothing without it.
Like 99% of our popular culture is fucking shit right now and that's partly why we're beginning to lose our competitive edge. I agree you are right about that, but you just look even at video games and I keep seeing Polish or other developers, you have big series like Game of Thrones and more and more it's incorporating Britain instead of Hollywood. I can already see the rot cracking us apart. I can see it everywhere in our society, and I can assure you, capeshit is not going to save us.
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No. 10256
>>10253
>Comrade I will eat tree bark if it means the rehabilitation of our culture
I'm having mad deja vu for some reason.

It's like I read this twice before.
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No. 10262
>>10253
>Like 99% of our popular culture is fucking shit right now and that's partly why we're beginning to lose our competitive edge. I agree you are right about that, but you just look even at video games and I keep seeing Polish or other developers, you have big series like Game of Thrones and more and more it's incorporating Britain instead of Hollywood. I can already see the rot cracking us apart. I can see it everywhere in our society, and I can assure you, capeshit is not going to save
You interpret it the wrong way. CoD, sports games, capeshit, cheap pop about love is exactly the kind of crap you get from a controlled propaganda machine. Propaganda and censorship wants people to be happy, they want image of people struggling against troubles and constantly winning and then get a happy family to become a happy citizen. That's exact what is wrong with modern pop culture, it does the same thing which an authoritarian propaganda does.
The only really good thing about propaganda is that people know it is. So while government culture rots itself, opposition becomes more thoughtful and reasonable. So here, for example, instead of proposed happy workers realism, brutal hyperrealism was thriving. All notable authors were writing about the real day to day life, where people are constantly suffering, heroes are those who die the most stupid death and love is just a picture from a screen.
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No. 10274
1,6 MB, 3:23
>>10070
I don't know if this is considered classical, but I like this type music. It's relaxing.
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No. 10310
>>10274
Gregorian chants aren't classical music but yeah, it's nice. There's something about choral music. There's a reason why most "epic" style music in say soundtracks uses some form of it, even if the words are often gibberish.
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No. 10629
>>10130
No reaction to these two suggestions? I was hoping to get a discussion going about lesser known classical (or other period) music. I know far too little about latin american compositions, for example, even though I absolutely adore these pieces by Aldemaro Romero and Arturo Marquez.
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No. 10630
>>10629
>. I know far too little about latin american compositions, for example, even though I absolutely adore these pieces by Aldemaro Romero and Arturo Marquez.
I don't even know who those people are tbh. Would be interested in hearing about it though.
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No. 10635
>>10630
Well, did you listen to the sound files I uploaded in the previous-previous post?

Here is the same orchestra from that recording in video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gpsHUUHZb9w

The amazing thing is that this is a youth orchestra, not professional musicians that earn their money with music.
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No. 10680
Some short piano pieces I like:

Kabalevsky - Piano Sonata 3, Op 46, 3rd movement - Allegro giocoso

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Czx5LgPXwlw

Finale from Prokofiev's Second War Sonata:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IRj9rvekmuc

Saint-Saens / Liszt - Danse Macabre:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xeN7YJ93lts
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No. 10724
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8buDQtwWOY

Some of Satie might be cliche, but right now I'm enjoying it as it's quite calming
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No. 10728
It's time to post Mahler's finest adagio movement

https://youtu.be/RQEoeXE2-0Q?t=1584
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No. 11494
19,8 MB, 15:06
I'd like to thank the Portuguese Ernst who introduced me to Shostakovich's music.
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No. 11509
I wouldn't consider myself a fan of classical music. I hardly know composers or compositions, I don't regularly listen to them and don't know anything about the music theory, pitch and timbre and such.
But as a person that likes "music" of course I enjoy some classical music.
A prime example would be when I had a long drive ahead of me, tuned the radio to a classical music station (standard radio had only the usual overplayed stuff) and I suddenly got sucked it.
That moment the station played Edward Elgar's Cello Concerto in e minor op. 85:
https://youtu.be/4t84Y2T3PmM

I think it resonated with me because I really like the soundtrack of the game Syberia:
https://youtu.be/qzljO6xumm8
and Arcanum:
https://youtu.be/ftvpi-6Z6qw

I enjoy this vibe of melancholia very much and would be happy if some of you can maybe suggest similar titles.

Also, when I watched the movie "Hannibal" (huge Hopkins fan) the "Vide Cor Meum" really got to me, some great melodies.
https://youtu.be/SP9IrCCMUUw

As you see I'm not really well-read in classical music but it is what it is.

>>10728
liked it very much, thank you for posting.
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No. 12482
Baroque best, Romantic worst. There's still good Romantic of course, but peak music was in the early 18th century.
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No. 13379
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pxZgPa1-kyE
Found this nice somewhat folksy piano concerto from China.
Was written during the Cultural Revolution, but it's still nice.
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No. 13380
>>11494
I only saw this post now, a month later. But you are welcome.

I learned about Shostakovich because a local classic music radio show used Waltz No. 2 as their introduction music and I spent over two years trying to figure out what this damned waltz was.

https://youtu.be/mmCnQDUSO4I
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No. 13386
>>13380
Why didn’t you just write an email to the station asking about it?
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No. 13389
>>13386
I did, but got no reply. It's owned by the state so I ended up having to e-mail some helpdesk for ministry of culture.
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No. 13536
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i like the classical and romantic periods the least, although i do like schumann a lot, his piano works in particular. i prefer early music and neue musik. minnesang, renaissance, baroque, expressionism, serialism, musique spectrale, musique concrète, minimalism etc. bach and vivaldi remain my absolute favourites, loved both as a kid already.
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No. 13634
I know it isn't classical but this is my favorite listening right now
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o81A31hlgEA