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No. 12766
252 kB, 1280 × 886
Which of the following careers will be automated in the shortest amount of time? Which has the lowest risk of automation?

Lawyer
Dogtor (medicine)
Dogtor (surgery)
Dogtor (researcher)
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No. 12767
I'm bydlo when it comes to economics, but I'd say lawyer, because there is still a long way until we can program a prolific bulshitter and have it be adaptable.
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No. 12771
>Which of the following careers will be automated in the shortest amount of time?
They are all too far from automation.
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No. 12776
Lawyer is a broad term. Grunt work has certainly seen growing automation and this has come about hand-in-hand with new links to accounting firms who are efficiency technophiles. Of course, I'm talking generic small claims and assisting the research workload i.e. it's more paralegals and new-entrants losing work. All branches of law have a certain moral dimension and no two cases can be said to match exactly. That will always require skilled human judgement and awareness because all previous attempts to boil law down into a rigid system have failed miserably. That's the problem with machine intelligence, it's terribly good at 2+2 but the world doesn't work like that which is why our own brains are estimation machines.

I can imagine medicine will be equally protected outside of the most basic tasks (although that appears to have been nothing but a fiasco). Human anatomy is incredibly complex and therefore requires adaptable medicine and a rather flexible working capacity both mentally and in physical operations. That's not something machines will take much as you will probably still need someone to do the cleaning in 40k.

So no, everything will be fine.
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No. 12794
>>12767
Completely wrong. We can replace that easiest which we pay the least attention to when it breaks.
If a doctor screws up even the slightest everyone notices the results. Lawyers, on the other hand, screw up almost by default and nobody wants to be bothered with all the bullshit to take a closer look.
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No. 12812
>>12767

Lawyer will be easy to replace even with current systems. Just program a system with the legal codes and check the boxes to see if the law has been broken or not.
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No. 12815
>>12812
:-DDD
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No. 12820
264 kB, 889 × 666
>>12776
>attempts to boil law down into a rigid system have failed miserably. That's the problem with machine intelligence, it's terribly good at 2+2 but the world doesn't work like that
Commander William T. Riker agrees with you.
The only way lawyers are automated out of existence is if people stop caring about the subtle differences between one case and the next. But what about automated to near extinction, where one person reviews/oversees the work that now occupies 100 people? In that case I would list OP's professions in order of technical streamline-ablity: medicine(most), lawyer, researcher, surgeon(least)
Based solely on the amount of intellectual creativity and intuition I think each requires.
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No. 12824
795 kB, 2998 × 1250
At least the explicit knowledge part of these professions is to a large extent made obsolete by the internet, so to that extent could arguably be called "automated"

Beyond that, I doubt there will be a lot of automation any time soon. It's even hard to define exactly what are the necessary skills beyond that, and I guess that's kind of the point
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No. 12835
>Lawyer
Automatic lawyers will be prohibited by law
>Dogtor (medicine)
>Dogtor (surgery)
Never will be fully automated, but soon Ai will help them a lot. The trouble is that software developers are pussies who are afraid of responsibility and nobody sane will take responsibility for machine learning.
My prediction is that Ai will soon help doctors in usa, but they will use to raise paycheck.
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No. 12839
>>12835
>but soon Ai will help them a lot.
It already exists, for example, expert systems.
I am sure this is not just advertised, because it is dangerous to trust in machine without human expertise.
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No. 12840
>>12839
Not as extensive as it should. Diagnosing should be assisted with neuronets and expert systems. But expert systems aren't popular right now and medical start-ups aren't popular after theranos deal.
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No. 12860
Calculation is just the bydlo part of research which comes after any intellectually challenging work for a researcher, so they have the least risk of automation.

For law, we don't have a proper set of rules a computer could handle but only guidelines which we (re)interpret all day when you think about it.

Diagnosis-algorithms could do a lot of work a physician is doing and super delicate brain surgery and stuff like that will require the precision of a robot in the very near future. It would be more straight forward though if a surgeon would control and supervise the machine.
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No. 12863
>>12860
>super delicate brain surgery and stuff like that will require the precision of a robot in the very near future. It would be more straight forward though if a surgeon would control and supervise the machine.

Sorry if I'm missing the point but isn't this the case already in some areas? Some younger surgeons today don't even know how to perform a vaginal hysterectomy because they use the minimally invasive robot-aided procedure for all such cases.
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No. 12864
>>12863
>don't even know how to perform a vaginal hysterectomy
It's explainable: first, I am not sure students are taught in mass to do that. There are not many cases, when hysterectomy is required, so it may be not taught properly.
Second, when it comes to ectomy anything, it's a grand fuck-up. Especially hyster.
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No. 12868
106 kB, 658 × 948
>>12863
Then I was right without knowing about it.
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No. 12886
Dogtor (researcher)
Unfortunately it is also the least well-paid.
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No. 12919
>>12886
For any serious science, I disagree. Pls elab.
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No. 12923
>>12919
Serious science? You mean like physics researchers or something? Why would that be automated faster? If anything that would be among the last things automated.
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No. 12925
Dogtor (medicine)
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No. 12926 Kontra
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No. 12943
>>12925
radiology is a perfect task for our contemporary AI, and AIs have proven higher rates of success compared to doctors - did I also mention they're faster?

https://www.radiologybusiness.com/topics/artificial-intelligence/ai-detects-neurologic-events-ct-faster-radiologists

of course AI is limited by the richness of the information being supplied to it, but I can easily imagine most monkey GPs being replaced by AI - 95th percentile diagnosis geniuses can take care of the error rate.
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No. 12945
>>12943
So I guess the most secure positions in medicine looking forward to the next few decades will be procedure heavy specialties like anesthesia, surgery, etc., as well as basic and translational research.
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No. 12946
>>12943
Ok time to sudoku, no job for me if so much is automated. Too dumb to be a dogtor.
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No. 12950
>>12943
Also normal family dogdor could be replaced by a certified healthcare app, At least for most cases. You can then print out or mail the recipe for medicine to the pharmacy next door or to an online pharmacy. Your iphone99 will monitor your blood pressure and some other indicators 24/7 anyway. If there is reason for concern it will automatically activate the healthcare app diagnosis protocol...
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No. 12952
240 kB, 500 × 394, 0:02
>>12946
>time to sudoku
Why go to all the trouble? I would wait until they automate it.
>>12950
>iphone99 will monitor your blood pressure and some other indicators 24/7 anyway. If there is reason for concern it will automatically activate the healthcare app diagnosis protocol
This is our future tbh.
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No. 12958
19 kB, 375 × 258
7,9 MB, 1024 × 768, 1:13
>>12952
And it's going to be so fucking bad that a couple thousand years ago we were warned the lucky ones will not have to live through it. We are rapidly heading into an even worse global despotism than anything previously dreamed possible in even the worst nightmare scenarios. What is baffling is the degree to which these useless fucks adopt or even defend all this crap. I can't even fathom why the fuck anybody would need to put their baby's diaper changes hooked up to the internet. I really hope that people are terrorized as thoroughly as possible by hackers abusing this technology for shits and giggles to at least raise [deepest concerns] among the idiot public.
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No. 13007
>>12952
>>12958

Why so negative, though.
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No. 13009
>>13007
People need jobs to make money and feel useful. Also, not everyone has the right aptitudes to be an AI researcher.
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No. 13013
15 kB, 300 × 189
>>12958
>I can't even fathom why the fuck anybody would need to put their baby's diaper changes hooked up to the internet
Such is life without God.
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No. 13015
>>13007
>why so negative, though?
My feelings in >>12952 were intended to be more apprehensive than negative. Pairing AI with portable monitoring devices can eliminate a lot of avoidable office visits, and that's a good thing. But also, giving up control of  sensitive personal information can create the potential for abuse by employers and governments.
Here is an amusing story of how using a simple medical device like a Fitbit can reveal a lot more information than you want to. Soldiers jogging were broadcasting the location of military bases.
https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-42853072
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No. 13027
68 kB, 300 × 189
>>13013
I didn't except the wall to have the same color as EC.
>>13015
>giving up control of sensitive personal information can create the potential for abuse by employers and governments.
Potential? Advertisment agencies already do that.
I'd say, there is a chrestomatic history, when Google served ads for pregnants to a girl which didn't think to be pregnant of herself, but later it became known that the girl was really pregnant.
There must be a culturogical research what's tyranny under Catholic, Orthodoxal, Protestantic Christian, Muslim, Confucian, Buddhism, Hinduism and Judaism moral.