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No. 16086
567 kB, 1346 × 585
Well I guess previous news thread is on kontra

News Thread
>>
No. 16088
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/03/technology/weather-channel-app-lawsuit.html
It is spooky to realize how much we are already living in the sinkhole to 1984, except that it's corporations not government doing it, like the absolute worst version of any cyberpunk dystopia.

Posting this below because if this becomes the news thread I don't want OP to stay stuck on one story/theme.
>>
No. 16179
266 kB, 1024 × 671
132 kB, 1024 × 618
This is what happens when you vote for corrupt right wing political parties or Hungarians, some here might claim
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/05/world/europe/hungary-protests-slave-law.html
>BUDAPEST — Gyula Radics is not easily angered. When Prime Minister Viktor Orban rewrote the Constitution to give his party greater power, he stayed on the sidelines. When the party took over state media, he was silent. And when the government forced the internationally renowned Central European University out of Hungary, he did not join the protests.

>But after Mr. Orban pushed through legislation compelling employees to work hundreds of hours of overtime without full or immediate compensation, he had enough.

>“Orban destroys lives and families,” Mr. Radics said as he prepared to march with thousands of protesters Saturday afternoon. A 39-year-old steelworker with five children, he traveled from Veszprem, an hour outside of Budapest.

>“This is all we have left,” he said. By this, he meant the streets.

>Over the past eight years, Mr. Orban has steadily used the instruments of a democratic state to undermine nearly all checks on his power.

>After a sweeping victory in April elections, his Fidesz party again controls two-thirds of the votes in Parliament, allowing it to pass any legislation it likes. Before breaking for winter recess, the party moved quickly to pass two contentious measures.

>One set up a parallel court system, a move widely condemned as undermining the rule of law. While legal experts warned of the profound consequences of ceding control of the judicial system to a political party, it was another measure — compelling workers to work 400 hours of overtime and allowing compensation to be delayed for three years — that fueled the most outrage.

>The legislation, branded the “slave law” by an uncharacteristically united opposition, has spurred the most sustained protests since Mr. Orban entered office in 2010.

>Fidesz leaders were initially dismissive of the anger.
>>
No. 16184
>>16179
I wouldn't say that he passed this law because he is corrupt, it's just that right-wingers supporting Orban are braindead and didn't think about consequences. You either have low birth rates and accept economic migrants or you don't accept migrants but instead you must have more babies, which is impossible, so you work more instead. Eastern Europe suffers from great brain drain to the West and they have even bigger problems than Germany, the UK or USA but because of pure emotional feelings aka nationalism they they doom themselves to the worst material conditions.
>>
No. 16191
>>16179
>>16184
It's a big nothing. The law in practice just legalize all those overtime our workers do anyway. Now on their "wageslip" the money they get for their overtime will be marked as such and not some vague "bonus" or with whatever tricks they account for it.
>>
No. 16199
>>16191

The article said
>allowing compensation to be delayed for three years

It that nothing? I would be pretty pissed as well. Shady bonus payments instead of accurate work hour payments is indeed not good. But getting accuracy in exchange for delay is nothing one could really strive for. There is something shady with the government when they don't just legalize it right away, why implant that delay? If the bonus payments were accurate before the law passed that would be even more faulty btw.
>>
No. 16201
>>16179
Well, I don't know the details, but at first glance it seems like a really dishonest move.
A betrayal if you will.
Orbán's slogan is that he is running the "System of National Unity" (Nemzeti Egység Rendszere), which exists to protect the nation's and its citizens well-being from foreign interference. "We will not be a colony" (Nem leszünk gyarmat!).
And then, this supposedly "National" and "Christian" government goes out, and sells its workers to the capital of the German factory owners in the name of "competitiveness".

Though I do understand the government's claims too, because if you have a lot of time on your hand, then you are actually allowed to work and get paid more.
The problems will arise in towns and villages where there are only a few employers, so the workers will have little bargaining power about whether or not they want to do overtime and get paid for it.

It's sad that they are writing about the demonstrations as if they are going to change anything. The last time this country "took up arms" and actually managed to override one of Orbáns decisions was when the government decided that they'll "tax the internet" in 2014.
>>
No. 16211
>>16201
>We will not be a colony"
>And then, this supposedly "National" and "Christian" government goes out, and sells its workers in the name of "competitiveness".

That's how right wing populism works everywhere.
>>
No. 16225
>>16184
> or you don't accept migrants but instead you must have more babies, which is impossible
My Catholic extended family says otherwise. You do realize people used to have like 17 babies because most of them didn't survive infancy/childhood right?

You can indeed just keep having lots more babies.
>>
No. 16232
>>16225
This is basic knowledge and I thought I don't have to explain every statement. No, you can't. Once your country becomes developed, people stop having children and no country in the world managed to reverse the trend. Theoretically, even Russia or China can become pro-Western and liberal over the next year, but it will require a huge set of circumstances and big changes inside the countries, so is the people's mentality and their desire to have children. The desires of one person or even an entire political party to raise birth rates wouldn't be able to radically change the reality and human mood, developed countries already give parental leave and tax concessions for familes but this is not enough. A high level of well-being leads only to a low birth rate.
>>
No. 16236
>>16232
The big problem of raising lots of kids is purely economic and besides which are you telling me that my 14 aunts and uncles were born in the third world? Because yeah guess how the baby boom happened. You know, that thing that gave rise to the term "boomer" as in, baby boomer? And it followed with massive economic prosperity and advanced nation conditions.

Fact is we have a disgusting neoCapitalist system that is robbing us blind and indebting everyone to the international banker and that the companies in turn would rather either outsource or import cheap labor than having to deal with a population that expects a living wage.

Oh and another thing a big part of the reason why we had such sustained growth was the GI bill. All these guys returning home had taxpayer funded programs for getting back into work through more training and education. Slashing medical and education costs while providing tax breaks and fiscal incentives along with government programs would massively improve our own birth rates.
>>
No. 16251
>>16236
The Warsaw pact members experienced the same boom and decline in birth rates and the socialist governments of respective countries did nothing, Germany, France, Netherlands, Scandinavia are the best welfare states in the world with little inequality and huge public sector prodiving free gibs for the population, yet citizens of those countries still don't want to have kids. Life in rich countries has greatly increased people's expectations from life, each generation takes the current high quality of life for granted and still complains that this ain't enough. Do people in Africa live better than Americans?
>>
No. 16254
>>16086
Honestely, I had hope that this thread would not be ressurected. Political disscutions and arguins constantly ending with terrible tier of posting.
>>
No. 16255
>>16251
But they did do something.
Anna Ratkó banned contraception and abortion, which led to a post-war baby boom.
>>
No. 16259
>>16211
>>16201
>sells its workers to the capital of the German factory owners in the name of "competitiveness".
That's how it works in the EU we're on a railroad here. It's true that Fidesz is only national because that's what it can sell to voters tho.

>>16184
>You either have low birth rates and accept economic migrants
More and more Ukrainians work here.
>you don't accept migrants but instead you must have more babies
Govt initiated measures that helps families to plan more than one kids.
>you work more instead
Not because making more babies is impossible, but because babies typically aren't popping out as skilled workers from their mothers' belly. It takes time. And the pressure to produce more shit is constant.
>>
No. 16260
People often talk about that we need more kids and that population decline, but in reallity, do we need more kids? We have more than 7.7 billion people already but not discovered any kind of warp engine to transfer people to other solar systems. And most of regions with current high birth rate are most times poor - and while they are improving their life quality to certain degree, birthrate dropping.
>>
No. 16262
>>16259
>that's what it can sell to voters tho
And what a voting base it has!
Pensioners who were Communist Youth members and were screaming "fascism" roughly 10 years ago. It's incredibly dishonest to see these people march during the Békemenet.
Makes me sick.
I wish I had no opinion on politics. I wish I knew nothing about this and be happily ignorant of the matter.
>>
No. 16280
>>16260
We don't need them, because real life is a big pile of shit, especially in Russia, but pensions are one of the most ravenous parts of the government's budget in any country and pensions of many old people depend on the current situation with labor market. I don't know how Ukrainian government is going to support its elders when millions of Ukrainians receive free education inside the country but prefer to work abroad.
>>
No. 16281
>>16251
>Germany, France, Netherlands, Scandinavia are the best welfare states in the world with little inequality and huge public sector prodiving free gibs for the population, yet citizens of those countries still don't want to have kids
There can be huge differences below the replacement rate. Italy and South Korea are close to one kid per woman. France is almost at replacement level, and not just because of Muslims having babies. Scandinavia and the Netherlands are closer to France than Italy, and IIRC most of former commieland is closer to Italy than France.

The main problem seems to be a compounding of liberation of women from the home, but without relative liberation in the workplace. If you can't be a housewife, but you also have to be a wageslave without French or Nordic-tier work laws, kids just aren't practical.

>>16260
I would like to see a declining human population, but the vast majority of human beings are soon going to live in poor shitholes with birthrates that will remain high for the foreseeable future, and which will still be exponentially increasing their own ecological footprint barring technological and structural revolutions.

So, as a rich country, it makes sense to simply focus on your own country's health - and unfortunately, the welfare state will be difficult to support if most people are pensioners and there are only a few young people to support them. Japan would be better off in the long run with a stable population half of what it is now, but there will be hell during the transition period, and who is to say the population will stabilize at 60 million, instead of declining further alongside an eternally declining welfare state?
>>
No. 16302
65 kB, 1425 × 625
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>>16254
No we are going to talk about politics and I for one am sick of seeing these blue zones just sitting back in their comfortable climate controlled high rises sipping cool lemonade in their topiary gardens while they watch the rest of us die and the planet turn into one big red zone. They think they have the technology but we have the numbers. Brothers, sisters, I have a proposition: we need more babies! It is therefore your revolutionary duty to have as many children as possible, and train them in making IEDs and holding a rocket launcher as soon as they can walk. And if you lose one? Birth two more!
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No. 16304
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47 kB, 640 × 480
>>16302
Ha ha I'am in blue zone.
Tbh in first tiberium war russia was part of GDI. However it was not same russia, it was russia after soiet union won Great War II and conquered most of europe, but then immideatly fall due to stalin death as was planned by Kane
>>
No. 16314
>>16281
>shitholes with birthrates that will remain high for the foreseeable future

They are declining everywhere.
>>
No. 16316
>>16314
Not everywhere, some African countries still have 5+ birthrate average
>>
No. 16317 Kontra
>>16316
They had 15+ birthrate 20 years ago
>>
No. 16321
>>16317
All of the people who have many children migrated to Europe.
>>
No. 16322
>>16321
According to...? Do you understand that 190 million people live in Nigeria alone, and Europe has not accepted even 1% of the African population as migrants?
>>
No. 16325
10 kB, 225 × 225
906 kB, 653 × 905
German Journalist Billy Six was and still is illegally incarcerated in Venezuela.

By the way this guy found also out that Ukrainian Airforce shot down MH17.
>>
No. 16330
And in heartwarming news today
https://mmajunkie.com/2019/01/ufc-fighter-polyana-viana-beats-up-man-who-tried-robbing-her
This woman beat the shit out of him
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=867C0AFF4ug
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPO_JZtvvgs
I have also realized to my murica ears brbr Portuguese sounds like a weird Spanishized Russian.
>>
No. 16335 Kontra
>>16325
>By the way this guy found also out that Ukrainian Airforce shot down MH17.

lol
>>
No. 16340 Kontra
>>16325
>Ukrainian Airforce shot down MH17.

Ach, Ernst.
>>
No. 16374
Holy shit I love the Orthodox now all praise be to Kirill
https://www.chron.com/business/technology/article/Russian-church-head-Smartphones-could-precede-13516621.php
>MOSCOW (AP) — The head of the Russian Orthodox Church says the data-gathering capacity of devices such as smartphones risks bringing humanity closer to the arrival of the Antichrist.

>In an interview shown Monday on state TV, Patriarch Kirill said the church does not oppose technological progress but is concerned that "someone can know exactly where you are, know exactly what you are interested in, know exactly what you are afraid of" and that such information could be used for centralized control of the world.

>"Control from one point is a foreshadowing of the coming of Antichrist, if we talk about the Christian view. Antichrist is the person who will be at the head of the world wide web that controls the entire human race," he said.
This I agree with word for word. He did not mention what I believe which is that Google itself is a forerunner of the Beast.
>>
No. 16406 Kontra
>>16325
>By the way this guy found also out that Ukrainian Airforce shot down MH17.

Ernstchan, I...
>>
No. 16422
>>16374
Why wouldn't he mention that Russian government has brought humanity closer to the arrival of the Antichrist then? :^)
>>
No. 16424
573 kB, 404 × 493, 0:02
The Ernstchan news thread, brought to you by schizenu.
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No. 16426
105 kB, 267 × 400
>>16422
Kirill is wise, he knows that the Russian government would never spawn the Anti-Christ. If anything, the Russian government might possibly charge the taxpayers for one, but it will only deliver a lesser demon at best.
>>
No. 16427 Kontra
>>16422
Lies! Russia’s morality is unshakable!
Putin pravoslavniy! :^)
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No. 16435
281 kB, 820 × 541
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>>16422
All this technology was properly holyfied and machine spitit now serves only for good
>>
No. 16470
56 kB, 425 × 169
It's not really important news but
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/florida-gov-ron-desantis-suspends-broward-sheriff-scott-israel-over-parkland-massacre-response/
I am honestly still completely fucking amazed by all this. So now that we have literally prison tier patrols by armed guards in schools now, we can rest safely assured that the good guy with a gun is apparently under no obligation at all to actually defend the students getting massacred. I am amazed that it took this long for there to be actual consequences for this kind of shit. This whole fiasco was just evidence that we should kick all the cops out of our damn schools since they're apparently completely useless anyway except for ruining our freedoms and killing the spirit of liberty in the youth.
>>
No. 16482 Kontra
>>16470
quality picture
amazing filename
>>
No. 16502
141 kB, 1024 × 512
>The event reflects a deepening Anglo-Japanese partnership on security and defence, with Japan eager to pull Britain into an increasingly turbulent Asia and Britain keen to firm up its international friendships after Brexit.

>Mr Abe came bearing gifts. He was expected to offer Mrs May political succour by backing her beleaguered Brexit deal, mindful of the more than 1,000 Japanese companies in Britain that stand to lose out if no deal is agreed. He lifted a ban on British beef and lamb that had been in place since the spread in Britain of bse, or mad-cow disease, over 20 years ago. That should reap £120m ($153m) for British farmers over five years. The two countries are also working more closely together on what Mrs May calls “grand challenges”: artificial intelligence, ageing societies and clean growth.

>But it is military co-operation that has truly blossomed. Britain and Japan both project themselves as outward-looking island nations committed to a rules-based international system. Mrs May endorsed Japan’s concept of a “free and open Indo-Pacific”, a term that alludes to concerns over China’s troublesome behaviour in the region. Since 2015 Britain has hailed Japan as its closest security partner in Asia, sent Typhoon fighter jets to carry out exercises with Japan’s air force and become the first country other than America to drill with Japan’s army. HMS Montrose, a frigate, will shortly head to Japan, becoming the fourth Royal Navy vessel to do so in under a year. These warships have co-operated with Japan’s in increasingly sensitive techniques, including anti-submarine warfare and amphibious landings.

>In December Japan upped its order of f-35 fighter jets; it is now due to operate more than Britain, which on the day of Mr Abe’s arrival announced that it had nine of the aircraft ready to deploy. Having a principal warplane in common will make it easier to swap data and tactics. Joint work on a new air-to-air missile is also moving ahead. And conversations are beginning over collaboration on navigation satellites and a next-generation fighter aircraft, both areas where Britain has peeled away from European partners and is keen to demonstrate that it has other suitors. There is also much for British and Japanese spy chiefs to discuss. British officials have been sounding the alarm over the involvement of the Chinese firm Huawei in 5g mobile networks; Japan barred Huawei from official contracts in December.

>These strengthening ties could one day turn into a formal military alliance, says one British official. Another observes that the defence relationship has not been this close since the Anglo-Japanese alliance of 1902. That pact ended 80 years of splendid isolation for Britain. Mrs May must hope that Mr Abe might at least ease her own.
https://www.economist.com/britain/2019/01/10/shinzo-abe-visits-britain-to-firm-up-security-ties

We did it, lads. Japanese waifus for everyone. No idea why we'd commit to a regional power so far away but they already like tea and curry so we'll have them watching Coronation Street in no time.
>>
No. 16503
129 kB, 1280 × 720
>>16502
>Japanese waifus for everyone.
Watch out so that they don't steal your kinpatsu shoujos for themselves instead, heh.

It looks like May is desperate. Guess she wants to save her face somehow, even if it is by means of something as silly as a military alliance with a country on the other side of the world. Speaking of the other side, could British Commonwealth potentially be a replacement for EU, at least concerning trade partnership? There are some members which are pretty strong economically, like Straya, Canada and India.
>>
No. 16505
>>16502
> No idea why we'd commit to a regional power so far away
This. Did you learn nothing from the Gitler? This is the most utterly useless alliance ever. What it really amounts to is Japan feels the US may be a more unreliable partner and wants to secure military especially naval technology because it has realized it requires its own standing defense capabilities against China. That's literally all this is.
>>
No. 16506
>>16503
>could British Commonwealth potentially be a replacement for EU
lolno
The British just fucked themselves pretty severely economically, militarily, and geopolitically and brexit is a complete disaster. They are, at best, a now extremely vulnerable hermit nation that's even more easily bent towards being a puppet of foreign players, the exact thing brexit itself was supposed to remedy. Britain cannot stand on its own two feet, it has a shabby economy that'll probably at best tailspin into Thatcherite conditions, it has no real force projection capabilities that aren't already piggybacking off of US forces, and all its other nations are not vassals anymore which is a cold reality the British peculiarly refuse to face. ANZAC is all too far away and generally uninvolved with British affairs. Canada is basically just our vassal and the Chinese are colonizing straya to an extent while NZ is basically just a useless backwater everyone wants to use as the international fallout shelter in case of WWIII. India could pick up the economic slack but they have their own problems to worry about.

The real shit hits the fan scenario would be on the off chance the pound devalues and the perception of UK not being safe or stable anymore drives enough financial interests out of London. Unlikely, but that in its own right would kill UK entirely. It has no real hold over any of its commonwealth countries, and the worst part is they're basically just going to become our Canada 2.0 because Britain really needed the EU more than it needed them and you can be damn certain the French and Germans are going to be particularly vindictive about all this.
>>
No. 16511
>>16503
>could British Commonwealth potentially be a replacement for EU, at least concerning trade partnership?
Maybe with actual colonies like Canada or Australia this could work, but the same people who can't stomach close ties with Europeans will absolutely not be able to handle similar ties with Indians or Africans.
>>
No. 16512
37 kB, 520 × 390
>>16506
ANZAC is a military formation, not a region. It's just ANZ. The last AC is 'Army Corps'. Also, you'd be surprised how in touch we are with Britain. They're still one of the most common places of birth of Australian residents and cricket series are basically informal diplomatic missions at times.

>the Chinese are colonizing straya to an extent
Not as much as you seem to think. They're very common in some places and less so in others. That's both physically and socially. I've come across more Japanese and Koreans than I have Chinese as a low-end worker. The Chinese are basically just the ones with the money. Also, it's not that weird for us to have a large Asian population when you consider the region we are located in. It's like being baffled as to why there are lots of Hispanics in the US.

>NZ is basically just a useless backwater everyone wants to use as the international fallout shelter in case of WWIII.
A 'useless backwater' which produces about 100PJ of crude a year from underdeveloped oilfields under very strict environmental laws, and one of the highest-regarded lamb industries in the world that feeds the largest sheep slaughterhouse in the Southern Hemisphere with one province which goes everywhere from China and Russia to France and the US, and in some of those countries it's the expensive stuff that has a name for itself. I know the stuff they package for France loudly proclaims it to be from Nouvelle-Zélande. They've got a lot of economic potential that people don't realise. They're not a major economy, but they aren't useless either

t. lived in both countries.
>>
No. 16513
>>16503
What's the worst that could happen?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZdebBX1fAo8

>It looks like May is desperate. Guess she wants to save her face somehow, even if it is by means of something as silly as a military alliance with a country on the other side of the world.

There's an immediate domestic and less visible geopolitical answer to it. On the face of things Abe has come out in voicing support for the EU Withdrawal Agreement due to be voted on in Parliament on the 15th. Japan has lots of business interests in Britain so losing market access in a no deal scenario would be a headache for them.

In the bigger picture Anglo-Japanese relations have been growing closer since Cameron was in power. These days we both need a partner on advanced projects and research so that's all good while Japanese anxiety over China is profitable for our defence industry (remember the US refused to sell them F-22s). We're quite natural friends without even getting into the closeness of our respective governments. I don't know if we can talk them into fucking up Russia again.

>Speaking of the other side, could British Commonwealth potentially be a replacement for EU, at least concerning trade partnership? There are some members which are pretty strong economically, like Straya, Canada and India.

Some members would be cool and NZ voiced support for a free trade agreement right after the referendum. The issue is our future trading relationship with the EU and what terms will come with market access which may hamstring any agreements that diverge with EU policy. That will take the majority of the 2020s to sort out and it is legally questionable how far we can formally go in other agreements before this beast is finalised.

Also there was an early attempt at wooing India but Modi wanted lower immigration barriers in return while the Indian market asked for lower standards (safety, environmental protection) on things like the chemicals industry so fuck 'em.
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No. 16514
>>16512
Oh I thought it was Australia New Zealand America Canada (with minus America). Thanks for correction.
>>
No. 16515
>>16514
No worries. Said formation is a major part of the national myth here.
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No. 16583
>>16506
>Germans are going to be particularly vindictive about all this
no, we don't. there would be nothing to gain for us and the other eu/ue members from such behaviour.
brits gambled and shot themselves in the foot royally, to say the very least. that is all.
>>
No. 16629
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>World's 'loneliest' frog gets a date

>A frog believed to be the last of his kind in the world has been granted a reprieve from solitude. Romeo, known as the world's loneliest frog, has spent 10 years in isolation at an aquarium in Bolivia. Scientists say they have found him a Juliet after an expedition to a remote Bolivian cloud forest.
>Teresa Camacho Badani is chief of herpetology at the Museo de Historia Natural Alcide d'Orbigny in Cochabamba City and the expedition leader. She is optimistic that opposites will attract, even in frogs: "Romeo is really calm and relaxed and doesn't move a whole lot," she told BBC News. "He's healthy and likes to eat, but he is kind of shy and slow."
>Juliet, however, has a very different personality. "She's really energetic, she swims a lot and she eats a lot and sometimes she tries to escape."
>Romeo was collected 10 years ago when biologists knew the species was in trouble, but was not expected to remain alone for so long. He attracted international attention a year ago over his search for a mate, and was even given a dating profile.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46867424

This is where we find out that she's gay.
>>
No. 16631
843 kB, 500 × 260, 0:02
>>16629
>This is where we find out that she's gay.
I fail to see how that would be relevant
>>
No. 16633
>>16629
How old do frogs get? I am surprised that Romeo is not only at least ten years old but obviously expected to live on for quite some time. For some reason I assumed those little amphibians live not even close to ten years.
I hope the two get along well and create a ton of offspring. Godspeed frogs!
>>
No. 16634
>>16633
I think the frog lives surely longer than hishurr its conspecifics in wildlife.
>>
No. 16636
>>16633
15 apparently. And while the major issue with amphibians atm may be a type of parasitic fungus, just reading the species extinction page makes me think Prince Charles was right, it would be nice to be reincarnated as a highly lethal virus to deal with the human population, however I would also hope that I'd wipe out the royal family along with culling the human herd.

How difficult do you think it would be to create a very long lasting gene bank to try and recreate species from clones?
>>
No. 16641
So May's Brexit deal has been rejected by the British parliament. Nobody seems to know what comes next.
>>
No. 16642
>>16641
From wat I hared, there will be vote of nonconfidence for May.
>>
No. 16644
>>16636
>a highly lethal virus to deal with the human population would be nice
I feel the same. Especially when reading another story about another species of animals being close to extinction because of human doing. I was always a fan of that idea in Twelve Monkeys. And I still have some hope that there is that one genetic engineer out there who also holds it dearly.
>>
No. 16645
>>16641
>>Nobody seems to know what comes next
From what I have read it should be more likely that they will now remain instead of exiting without an agreement.

>>16642
I feel pity for her. Honestly. She never really had a chance. It was clear from the start that the EU would not make any concessions in favour of Britain in the negotiations. And she herself had not even supported the Brexit. But she always said that retreating from the decision to leave the EU would mean to betray the voters and she wasn't gonna do it. That I liked.
>>
No. 16656
151 kB, 839 × 1199
>>16641
Corbyn will table a no confidence motion and parliamentary arithmetic requires Tory defectors and/or DUP to quit the supply agreement.

-The Tories just had a leadership challenge that May smashed.
-There is a 75% chance Sinn Féin would become the largest party in NI were general election held tomorrow.

You could argue that 'no deal' Tory MPs might fancy their chances of finding a leader to replace May but they don't have anyone viable. So nothing happens and in a minimum of three weeks we'll have a new vote on the Withdrawal Agreement.
>>
No. 16657
>>16656
But you do have an alternative though
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJzW_gFoXR0
>>
No. 16659
>>16656
>>16657

What I don't get is what do torries and other antiEU Brits even want? They don't want a "no deal brexit", after 2 years of negotiations they decide they also don't want a Brexit deal but they also don't want to stay in the EU.

I mean..., what the hell do they even want?
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No. 16664
>>16659
i have no idea what may, johnson, farage, rees-mogg, corbyn and the likes actually want, but their voters on dailymail apparently believe that they are better off without an exit deal, unless brussels bows before all their special snowflake demands. daily mail posters still act entitled like cameron et al. used to when britain was an eu member still. like, getting all advantages the eu offers for free plus additional privileges, rebates and bonuses they believe they are entitled to - all without britain taking any responsibility and without committing to standards eu members agreed upon.
that is completely deluded and actually quite nasty behaviour, to be honest. it's getting annoying too, so i'd say let them have their hard exit and all the shit it entails, if that's what they desire. i'm not a politician though.
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No. 16667 Kontra
So this is old news and isnt actually that relevant but I found this interesting tidbit while looking around different religious movements and foundation backers/nonprofits/NGO whatever
https://www.digitalshadows.com/blog-and-research/anonymous-poland-not-your-typical-hacktivist-group/
So at first I thought "ayyy is 'anon' actually even still around" but then looking at it their other branches involved world anti doping agency and Ukrainian ministry. Which made me think for how long has Russia been attempting to puppeteer things like Anonymous or hacktivists groups? Although this looks like a very sloppy job since they left their Signature in that type of Twitter activity.

What front groups is Russia using right now to hack things? Just how many dormant dummy accounts and sock puppets do you think Russia has across all media platforms?