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No. 27598
479 kB, 600 × 443
Anyone work in a corporate setting?
Any protips for a bernd/ernst not really meant for the corporate world but willing to try?
I'm about to start a 6 month contract in an entry level corporate role next week at a major Australian bank.
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No. 27614
Sure, here's a good pro-tip: use your spare time to find out about how production works. Who does what, who solves which problems, how does the IT work, what immediate next steps are available in that corporation for your career, how can you improve your qualification, et cetera. The management should provide you with all the necessary textbooks and commentary; a lot of junior positions will be available for you if you are willing to attain the appropriate certifications in the respective fields.
You can go on to become a project manager, a systems administrator, a network engineer and so on - that is the subset of jobs that I've seen as potential next steps when I worked in an entry-level position in a major bank.
Take your time and enjoy the opportunity to discover how production works and how is everything organized. ITIL, ISO 20001, project management doctrines such as PRINCE2 and PMBOK, business processes, procedures and practices - with the right inclination, your first few months there can be really enlightening.
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No. 27617
>>27614
>Who does what, who solves which problems
Indeed very important. I don't like to call it networking, because that always sounds like being overly nice to people you don't like, but getting to know the people who can help you out is a major factor when you arrive at a new job. Also: Don't be a smartass, and don't try to push your opinion on things too hard, even if you know you're right. Companies might act like they want it the other way around, but in my experience companies prefer people who don't cause a ruckus - no matter how noble the intentions were. So try to integrate without causing your coworkers or your boss any trouble, and when you have a few years of experience and made a name for yourself, then you can still bring in your own ideas and do things your way.

Also: Don't be scared of how good everyone might be. You are always clueless when you are new at work, even with experience. 12 years or so ago I thought I'll never make it, because everyone else was so good at their jobs, but now 12 years later I can see how everything is just a collection of skills you naturally acquire over the years, nothing magical to it.
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No. 27703
>>27614
>a lot of junior positions will be available for you if you are willing to attain the appropriate certifications in the respective fields.
It really works the other way round. A manager will provide text books and have corporate pay for an exam, if they want you in a certain position. They want you there if they think you will be useful for them in the future, i.e. you will act in a way that will help them to advance, not their competitors. For example, in a service department like IT, you will give preferential treatment to their needs.
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No. 27793
14 kB, 400 × 218
Check out this essay series: https://www.ribbonfarm.com/2009/10/07/the-gervais-principle-or-the-office-according-to-the-office/

I feel like it helped me have a decent mental framework for operating inside a corporation. Though of course you should take it with a grain of salt, e.g. I know it made me too quick in adopting a slacker mindset and dismissing middle managers as clueless. So I always did just enough so that my boss and coworkers were satisifed, and that left me with browsing twitter, reading articles and trading shitcoing 2/3 of the time or so. Depending on your goals, it might not be too relevant for you but I think it might be interesting to at least skim regardless.
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No. 27843
>>27793
>know it made me too quick in adopting a slacker mindset and dismissing middle managers as clueless
According to the series, you can't be too quick in adopting a slacker mindset and being clueless is the definition of a middle manager. Are you dumb? Every minutiae if real work you put in is a list Minute, you fucking idiot. If you don't get rich from it, there's no point in working.
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No. 31552
>>27843
Some caveats I've encountered are:

  1. That makes you vulnerable for becoming too outdated/unskilled to maintain your current position, which leaves you in a bind if you lose your job. You can retrain, of course, but in my experience hiring managers will be especially sensitive towards corporate accomplishments because they don't want (but will probably get) the aforementioned "loser" worker.
  2. There do exist some worthwhile opportunities that aren't just "get rich." Like >>27614
says, the difference between dealing with customers and being a internal sysadmin can be night-and-day in terms of relative stress/salary.

These are the exception, but if you fully log out of what is going around you, you'll be much more likely to miss it.
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No. 31561
First week on my current job, two of the people in charge of my team took me aside to have an obligate "get to know each other" conversation.

As soon as they asked if I liked Marvel movies or was a "fan" of anything else, I knew I would have no social life at work. As soon as I told them I had no interest in Marvel movies and spent most of my time reading history books and playing video games, they knew the same thing.

90% sure the manager above all of us was scouting me out for higher responsibilities because she kept coming by my desk and asking me about the job for the first week. Her boss even conspicuously came and sat down next to me at lunch one day and tried to talk as well. But, I sperged out each and every time without fail, and they just gave up after a while. Social skills and getting along with people are infinitely more important than intelligence or ability.
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No. 31564
>>31561
>As soon as they asked if I liked Marvel movies or was a "fan" of anything else, I knew I would have no social life at work.
I'd take that as a mixed blessing. Workplace socializing has a huge chance to be toxic, especially when politicking is unavoidable. While having no social life at all is worst for most folk, I'd try to seek out some sort of Third Place instead:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_place

>Social skills and getting along with people are infinitely more important than intelligence or ability.
A corporation where that is the only thing that matters is either a monopoly or is soon to be eclipsed.
I'd argue those two qualities are rewarded so highly because within a team, it facilitates a more stable (if slower/less impressive) achievement of assigned purpose, and allows for a greater fungibility when team members inevitably move on. At the core of it, a single dick in the wrong place and wrong time can really gimp a team's ability to work together on anything, and bring out discord between others which otherwise could've been avoided.

It looks much, much worse for a team to deliver to fail something than to deliver overtime, overbudget, or just in a lacking manner.
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No. 31566
>>31564
Thankfully, I have a collection of RL and old KC friends that I keep in regular contact with over the internet. I'm 100% happy having virtually no in-person human contact and just interacting with these people over Discord or Steam. It's not that I have an intense desire to have a social life at work, but I regret not being able to establish any personal contacts that would enable me to advance beyond mere grunt.

Not that I blame anyone. I'm 100% mentally checked out, and even if I was made the CEO of the company, I would just quit after a year and use the money I saved to NEET out in an affordable country while I write and play video games.
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No. 31587
>>27793
I am an overperforming loser (-> clueless) slowly becoming second in command, outperforming the other clueless guys.

How to become a proper sociopath, Ernst?
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No. 31605
>>31566
> It's not that I have an intense desire to have a social life at work, but I regret not being able to establish any personal contacts that would enable me to advance beyond mere grunt.
I feel like this is the hardest part of working. It's like one wants to be seen as more than a disposable drone while also not really wanting to be anyone's new best friend. It's a very specific target.
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No. 31606
58 kB, 572 × 381
>>31564
>I'd take that as a mixed blessing. Workplace socializing has a huge chance to be toxic
I also am reluctant to force friendships at the workplace, but for different reasons. Over the years, I worked with several customers in several teams. Almost any time, I met people I got along with very good, and we also met up in private, which was kinda difficult for me to arrange, because I am commuting to work. Still, all that workplace-based friendships almost instantly vanished when our teams dispersed. This has happened several times already, while my personal friends are almost the same than 20 years ago. Since then, I have become wary not to confuse coworkers I get along with good with personal friends. Not that I actively try to prevent it, if it happens, it happens. It's just like it looked like it would happen several times, and a little later it showed that it was all temporary.

I also outright hate it when companies try to force social interactions with team events / teambuilding exercises and stuff like that. It's literally a manipulation attempt to make it more difficult for employees to ask for raises or to quit, because they are more likely to stay in place for lower pay when they have personal ties. I especially enjoy when companies try and schedule these events in my spare time. I thank dog every day for my luck that I can tell them to beat it when they try that move, without too much fear of losing my job (might still backfire some day). I have a hard time understanding why the majority of people these days think that one would like hanging around the people in your spare time that one already hangs around with on the job, and only because one gets paid to do so. That almost seems like an insult to me, like the company is telling me that my social life is so shit that I should be happy to spend more time with my coworkers t. posting on EC saturday evening. And even if people really wanted to do so, they will do on their own account, and need no company support for it.
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No. 31820
>>31587
First start taking your sick leave, never apologise.
Learn to backheel jobs and questions, better you speak to management, this isn't my department ect
Next look at successful people, they always job hop.
Last is simple, embellish your qualifications, job role and experience, apply for new jobs, network, only apply for jobs which are better than your own or 10-15% higher salary.
Realise you will never get a true promotion, ie a higher position they will just give you a title like senior or head, but not give you a written contract, just more work and responsibilities but no underlings.
Start taking extended coffee breaks in other dept rooms, relax in the smoking area, just getting some fresh air, ask for an email before you do someonelse's work, if they don't send you an email don't do it.
Instead of spending 90% of your work time, working, spend 50% working, the rest net-working, looking for other opportunities and kissing ass.
First thing you can do is look for a company transfer or switch to another department.
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No. 33587
128 kB, 960 × 540
If you make a good impression by performing well in your duties and manage to become a regular, you will be given more and more tasks over time which will shape your role in the long term.

Work effectively, get enough sleep, teach yourself how to manage stress without becoming an alcoholic and how to not be affected by the remarks of asshole personalities at the office. These things are the key to surviving in the gorborate world.