/int/ – No shittings during wörktime
„There is no place like home“

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No. 2907
130 kB, 858 × 800
Does ernst keep any exotic pets?

Spider courtship is fascinating. It is also strangely satisfying watching spiders tapping
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1GalkM3KM4s

Look at this poor ernst spider at the end https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7qMqAgCqME

Let us pet some invertebrates
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0RpTDL9rtI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPo8MG1pJ8w
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qw6H-5EzuUI

In my experience bees are especially pettable. They're normally pretty laid back about being pet by humans both carpenter bees and honey bees. Do note: I am talking about actual bees, not wasps. Wasps tend to be way more ornery and like acts will try to attack your finger. Unlike ants they actually hurt. Petting moths and butterflies can be dangerous to the insect because it can rub off all their scales especially wings. You'll notice if you hold or capture one you'll be coated in the sheen of their scales.

Pretty C&A though https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9t4psCxa5L0
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No. 2912
>>2907
Does a petted bee feel petted? Speaking for myself, I wouldn't appreciate being petted by something that has fingernails bigger than I am.

Maybe the bee in the video you linked to does not ask for more, but instead feels dirty and tries to clean itself.
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No. 2915
128 kB, 681 × 572
>>2907
>In my experience bees are especially pettable
eeeehh that depends on their mood, wheather conditions and other factors. i've catched about 10 stings so far this year. t. beekeeper
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No. 2916
>>2915
Yeah, but compare them to wasps. Wasps are mean motherfuckers and they are not pettable under any conditions. I rescued one of those assholes from drowning in my honey-jar once, and what did it do, went and stung me, the ungrateful bitch.

Granted, I didn't do it for her, but for my honey, but it still was an asshole move.
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No. 2935
>>2916
Wasps are so easy to kill, though. Just wait until they sit down on any surface and squasch them. Their reaction time is laughable and they are slow as fuck.
Ever since I've discovered that, I no longer fear the beasts.
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No. 2968
>>2915
>I've catched about 10 stings so far this year.
Do you ever get used to them? I'm allergic and avoid bees at all costs. I went more than ten years without getting stung until a wasp got me last summer. I can confirm
>>2616
>wasps are mean motherfuckers.
Even so, I can't bring myself to knock down the mud nests they keep building by my door. But those things feel like ticking time bombs.
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No. 2985
>>2968
>Do you ever get used to them?
not really. i think i lost the fear of getting stung, subjectively i also feel less pain (on the other hand i was never particularly sensitive to bee/wasp stings) and the itching tends to stretch over two or 3 days as opposed to 4 to 6 days. however, even beekeepers never "get used" to stings, i think. there are beekeepers who suffered over 9000 stings without problems and then they might catch a single sting pumping a lot of poison directly into a vein causing them to collapse.
>I'm allergic and avoid bees at all costs.
you can try desensitization therapy, however i don't know whether it actually works or not. i recommend you to get a bee sting emergency kit, which should contain a syringe pre-filled with adrenaline as well as antihistamine and cortison meds. it definitely works, is a lot cheaper than a therapy and makes your life more comfortable, since you don't need to worry about getting stung anymore.

>>2935
> Their reaction time is laughable and they are slow as fuck
wasps are actually VERY sensitive to quick movements. you might have dealed with single already exhausted
specimen.
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No. 3066
>>2985
I think your advice is smarter than my strategy. I can't always avoid them, and I actually twisted my ankle a few years ago when a bee startled me and I started running. I had to limp home and couldn't walk for weeks. That's how afraid of bees I am. Watching OP's videos of the man petting a bee I was sweating.
Looking into why people keep bees I found this list of reasons:
>1. The opportunity to be outdoors – to commune with Nature
>2. Fascination with observing the organizational skills and inner-workings of honey bee colonies
>3. Setting yourself apart from the crowd – delving into a vocation or avocation that few would consider
>4. Producing honey
>5. To earn a living
>6. For the therapeutic value of bee stings (or for masochists)
>7. For the relatively independent life-style
>8. You inherited a bee farm

I like that last reason. If I can ask, why do you keep bees? I was surprised to learn some people can keep bees in cities, I thought you needed a lot of space, like a farm or something.
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No. 3074
>>3066
>You need a lot of space
Nah, not really. The beehaives themselves don|t need much space, plus bees only commute a few km. Classical max distance are given at two to five kilometers for carnica. So you need a few square meters for the hives, and sufficient food sources in a 2km radius.

Around this time of the year and in German cities, that might be lavender in gardens, for example.

If you want to help city-bees, pick roses with single blooms or at most double blooms over roses with full blooms for your garden. That way, the bees can find a way in.
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No. 3228
197 kB, 470 × 622
>>3066
a bee allergy is certainly no fun and shouldn't be taken lightly, that's why i recommened you getting an emergency kit. i keep one handy all the time when i'm working at the hives, even though i'm not allergic myself. just in case.

i got into beekeeping kinda out of neccessity when the old beekeeper from whom i used to get honey (for making mead) died a couple years ago. i didn't want to buy honey with questionable heritage and quality off supermarkets or wholesalers and didn't knew other beekeepers who'd sell me a couple small buckets for a decent price. however, i was sort of fascinated by beekeeping since my grandpa's best pal, who operated an apiary (unfortunately sort of a rare sight nowadays), sort of introduced me to it when i was a little boy. compared to 'regular' farming i knew from home e.g. chicken, rabbits, sheep, goats etc. the old dude working with bees in a little hut in the forest appeared almost magical to me, however, i didn't got into beekeeping myself until that incident for some reason assburgerdom and procrastination, berndernststyle.

>Looking into why people keep bees
from your list 4, 2 and 1 (in this order) apply to me. earning a living with beekeeping is quite difficult, there are actually only very few full-time beekeepers in germany (about 70 throughout the whole country iirc). they have to deal with huge costs, huge amount of hives, huge amount of maintaining work, need to travel a lot with their bees and need to employ cheap labour from poland or czechia because importers, wholesalers and retailers pay ridiculously little sums to local beekeepers for 1kg honey, so they can sell to supermarkets and still make profit. i sell my honey and other products mostly to friends and neighbours privately and occasionally on village fairs and christmas markets. it helps to pay bills a bit. it's a nice hobby though and i enjoy being in nature, watching how young bee organisms develop to full strength over the year etc.
>I was surprised to learn some people can keep bees in cities,
it became a thing here among city hipsters recently, too. 1 hive doesn't take up much space. however, i look down on these people tbh. in nature, bees dwell inside forests, next to fields with lots of pollen and nectar. they don't belong into an environment composed of concrete blocks and all sorts of irritating emmissions which is crammed with large amounts of humans, large amounts of waste etc.

i'm >>2985 btw.
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No. 3245
>>3228
I have nothing to contribute to the thread, but I just wanted to say that your posts are interesting and wish you best of luck with your bees.
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No. 3348 Kontra
>>3245
t-thanks, you too. actually i thought ernst would find it boring af. irl most people seem to find it boring/uninteresting, i rarely get asked about it. though it could have to do with the fact that i'm a boring assburger myself irl, which is nothing unusual among beekeepers here though.
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No. 3766
3,8 MB, 2080 × 1560
946 kB, 951 × 717
I truly feel like this is one of the more EC tier of hobbies/pets

I can't believe how much time, money, and effort I eventually sunk into this and just with the lowest settis possible, not even cichlids, loaches, marine or anything.
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No. 10781
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