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No. 321
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Scientists all over Europe are attempting to breed back certain European species that went extinct at some point in history as for instance the Aurochs and the European wild horse.

How do Ernsts think about these attempts at breeding back lost European species?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breeding_back

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tauros_Programme
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No. 322
>>321
>Locations:
>Croatia: Since 2014 in the Lika plains at the foot of the Velebit Mountains
Interesting. Have you seen them on your own?
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No. 324
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>>322
No, sadly not. From internet sources it looks as they are planning to cross 2nd generation Tauros cattle (crosses of different ancient Spanish breeds like Sayaguesa, Tudanca) with Podolian cattle breeds like Boškarin and Podolica. Sadly most of these projects seem a bit intransparent and there is particulary little infa about this project in Velebit area.
Might have to do with a deadly bull attack on a hiker sme years ago.

According to this forumpost from 2016 http://carnivoraforum.com/topic/9481868/124/
they have about 80 animals, consisting of Sayaguesa, Boškarin, Maremmana, Podolica, and Tauros crosses in at least two herds. The area might be extended to over 1 000 hectares in future. In the long term they plan to "explore the possibility to connect Lika Plains with the Velebit Mountains, to allow for seasonal migration of wildlife. This will be one of the first of its kind in Europe."

https://rewildingeurope.com/news/second-generation-of-tauros-now-grazing-in-lika-plains/
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No. 325
the prospect of resurrecting auerochs is certainly very nice and tempting, however it's basically larping.
in my opinion it's impossible to reverse breed with conventional breeding/selection, in order to succeed a fully decoded auerochs dna and cloning is needed. even with regular breeding/selection techniques it's already super difficult to achieve something, what's more, the best results still come with either obvious or not so obvious unexpected drawbacks which might prove disadvantegeous under changing environment conditions in the next couple years.
you see, i'm generally not a big fan of breeding. t. beekeeper ernst
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No. 328
I only have jurassic park-tier knowledge of these matters, but I'd like a lot to see old animals resurrected.
Seeing for example Wisents gives a glimpse of how impressive and interesting "old" animals are.
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No. 331
>>325
I remember reading that aside of human activity, megafauna extincted because of climat change.
I'll provide proofs a bit later.
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No. 332
Tbh, attempting to breed back from European stock is not the best idea. They're pretty detached from Aurochs DNA and you will just end up with something that they'll call an Aurochs but won't really be one. You'd be better off using a Zebu as a base and then trying to breed the Indian subspecies of Aurochs out with European Taurines because Zebu cattle are a lot closer to their ancestor than Taurine ones.
t. cattle knower
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No. 335
What is the point? Do those breeds have somehow tastier meat or milk? Or they just want to show them at zoos, or even breed them simply for the sake of breeding?
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No. 337
>>335
probably just for the sake of scientific progress and because they can.
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No. 338
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>>331
At least in Australia, first humans to arrive fucked up the megafauna by burning the forests down for the purpose of easier hunting.
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No. 340
>>338
I read it in context of Siberia - like it was becoming warmer, mammoth steppes were dying in new climate, so was dying mammoth's food, so mammoths died and humans just made it faster.
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No. 343
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>>325
Yes, they probably won't be ever be able to breed a 100% Aurochs, but a 80%-90% Auerochs might be possible. The Aurochs DNA is already decoded for the most part as far I know. Hence it is known that all modern demestic cattle are descendants of the Aurochs. Cloning also brings its own problems.

>>328

The Wisent/European Bison is considered to be a hybrid species between the extinct ancient Steppe Bison (also ancestor of the American Bison) and Aurochs cattle. That's probably why they have them around at the Tauros project and at some point might include them in the breeding (not sure about that)

>>332
European stock isn't necessarily further away than other domesticated cattle like the Zebu for instance. They actually do crossbreed African Watussi (which are 5000 years old domesticated cattle from crossing Zebu with ancient Egyptian cattle) into the herds sometimes.

https://rewildingeurope.com/app/uploads/2016/01/Aurochs-genetics_summary_final.pdf

>>335
Today it's mostly a part of the Rewilding Europe approach, a large-scale environmental conservation project aimed at restoring and protecting some core wilderness areas:

https://rewildingeurope.com/tag/aurochs/
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No. 344
>>337
It started with the because we can attitude in Germany 1930s.:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heck_cattle

But now they want to reintroduce a wild native species of large grassing bovine animal in Europe because that was part of the original European ecosystem before humans destroyed it in large parts.
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No. 353
I wonder, are these Tauroses related to European bisons?
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No. 356
>>353
Not yet. Maybe never. I actually don't know:

>The research also identified a number of breeds that are genetically close to the aurochs, but are not yet used in the Tauros Programme. The reason for this was that by phenotypical features (the way the animals look) better breeds were available. Future studies will determine if some of the newly identified breeds should be included in the programme.

>Future research also needs to dive deeper into the genetic features of the aurochs, to be able to identify specific genes for domestication, and thus getting more ‘grip’ on genes that could be crucial for the opposite direction – the rewilding of the species. More fully sequenced specimens of the aurochs that cover a substantial part of the European continent are needed, to be able to get an idea of the genetic diversity within aurochs.

https://rewildingeurope.com/news/genetic-study-shows-how-close-primitive-cattle-breeds-are-to-the-lost-aurochs/
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No. 357
It like last time when hitler tried to clone ancient ciws and then they started attacking local villagers?
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No. 365
>>343
They focus too much on aesthetics. Some of those breeds are old enough to be pretty close to usable but others aren't really that old and are closer to other domesticated breeds than wild ones. They should focus on finding confirmed ancient breeds and working from there to try and make an Aurochs as close as they can, not just throw together traits that look close enough to the real deal and call it an Aurochs. That's why I say the Zebu should be in there since their oldest breeds date to the Indus Valley Civilisation and around the same sort of period that saw the disappearance of the Indian Aurochs.

Find enough of the ancient breeds to make a good baseline of the oldest bovine genetics you could get your hands on. Then breed those cattle with the visual traits you want. That way you are going to end up closer to the real thing.
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No. 366
>>357
Soudns like Jurassic Park, but with cows and it would be rather called Pleitstocene park.
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No. 463
>>357
Lolshto
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No. 477
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>>476
>The Heck brothers – working independently - crossed Spanish fighting bulls with Highland cattle, along with primitive breeds from Corsica and Hungary. The result – Nazi super cows. They were used for propaganda material during WWII – their bodies were huge and muscular, with massive horns – an illustration of the strength of the party.

Well, what the Heck brothers did pretty much fits the criticism from >>325 and >>365 as in larping the Aurochs with barely ancient breeds and going too much just for some spectacular looks in too short time.
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No. 482
>>477
A model experiment. Nazis wanted to use the same methods to breed humans, that's what they had "Lebensborn" for.
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No. 483
>>482
And now, they are at it again. In Ustacha-land. Go figure.
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No. 661
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>>482
>>483

>hurr durr Nazis In Ustacha-land

I wonder if it constantly hurts in the heada being as stupid as you are.

>Tauros
Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Croatia, Czech Republic.

>Taurus
Germany, Hungary, Denmark, Latvia, Netherlands

>Heck cattle
Netherlands, Germany, France, UK

>Auerrind project
Germany
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No. 666
>>661
why do you make excuses for fascists when you aren't a fascist?
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No. 667 Kontra
>>666
Just go shitposting somewhere else
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No. 670
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Reading the thread I can understand why it makes sense from a conservation perspective. It's that story of the reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone all over again and maybe having a park which shows old Europe would not only make € but allow us to learn more from observation about how the ecosystems of Europe used to operate.

However it is still breeding feral animals the size of cars so you can imagine the chaos that could be unleashed if funding ran low for safety or if mass importing various strains of cattle transmits disease. Then there is the off-chance that we accidentally breed hyper-intelligent cows that enslave us thus leading to much smugness from vegans. The risk seems too great if you ask me.
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No. 675
>>670
If they get uppity, just shoot them. Fatmasters used to shoot Bisons by the thousand, just for fun. And to starve non-white people.
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No. 677
>>670
>Cave man science fiction
That comic is a fallacy put in human form. The use of a certain technolgoy not automatically leading to the end of the world does not mean that there are no dangers involved. For example, countless cities actually burned down due to people being careless with fire. Some cities even burned down multiple times, London amongst them.

Also, who ever drew this read the wrong kind of Science Fiction.
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No. 688
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>>675
Could be harder than it sounds. Remember that Britain has had wallaby's hopping around since at least the 1970s like we're some opposite Australia in waiting.

>>677
It's a gag about how sci-fi movies consistently feature new technology as a cheap plot device to show man's arrogance. I believe I first saw this when the first of the new Planet of the Apes was released for context. It was attached for the silly reference about man coming under the whip.

Don't have a cow, man