/int/ – No shittings during wörktime
„There is no place like home“

File (max. 4)
Return to
(optional)
  • Allowed file extensions (max. size 25 MB or specified)
    Images:  BMP, GIF, JPG, PNG, PSD   Videos:  FLV, MP4, WEBM  
    Archives:  7Z, RAR, ZIP   Audio:  FLAC, MP3, OGG, OPUS  
    Documents:  DJVU (50 MB), EPUB, MOBI, PDF (50 MB)  
  • Please read the Rules before posting.
  • Make sure you are familiar with the Guide to Anonymous Posting.

No. 3248
4,1 MB, 5472 × 3648
I have a question: "Wann ist der Unterricht aus?"
Can I answer like this: "Der Unterricht ist um 10 Uhr aus."?
Thank you for your answers!
>>
No. 3249 Kontra
You can. That said, I've never heard it formulated as "aus sein" and would usually use "vorbei sein". May be a regional thing though.
>>
No. 3252
>>3249
It is the standard colloquialism here.
>>
No. 3255
Thank you very much!
>>
No. 3784
4,1 MB, 5472 × 3648
Please, check my sentences. I translated from Russian to German:
  1. Кого спрашивает учитель? - Учитель спрашивает слушателя (студента, девушку).
Wen fragt der Lehrer? - Der Lehrer fragt einen Hörer (einen Studenten, ein Mädchen).
2. Что вы переводите? - Мы переводим этот текст (это упражнение, это предложение).
Was übersetzen Sie? - Wir übersetzen diesen Text (diese Übung, diesen Satz).
3. Мы изучаем иностранный язык.
Wir studieren eine Fremdsprache.
4. Учитель проверяет домашнее задание.
Der Lehrer prüft die Hausaufgabe.
5. Слушатели делают ошибки.
Die Hörer machen Fehler. Der Lehrer korrigiert diese Fehler.
6. Я понимаю это предложение (это слово, это правило).
Ich verstehe diesen Satz (dieses Wort, diese Regel).
7. Кто переводит текст правильно?
Wer übersetzt den Text richtig?
8.Объясните, пожалуйста, это правило!
Bitte, erklären Sie diese Regel!
9. Читайте предложение ещё раз!
Lesen Sie den Satz noch einmal vor!
10. Составьте примеры и напишите эти примеры на доске!
Bilden Sie Beispiele und schreiben Sie diese Beispiele an die Tafel.
11. Напишите дату на доске!
Schreiben Sie das Datum an die Tafel.

Thank you!
>>
No. 3785
>1

Hörer? Like in Zuhörer? Use Schüler or Student.

>5

Again, use Schüler or Student.

The others seem to be fine, but since i don't know Russian they could be totally wrong as well. It might be better if you translate them to english so non Russian speakers know if it makes sense or not.
>>
No. 3788
>3. Wir studieren eine Fremdsprache.

Usually you would say

Wir lernen eine Fremdsprache.

studieren is not wrong but unusual usage.

Du studierst Germanistik, Romanistik, Slawistik. You study a philology and learn a language.
>>
No. 3789
>>3785
What especially Anglos don't know, is that Student is a college student, while Schüler is pupil and teachers in university are not called Lehrer(Teacher) but Dozent(Lecturer) or often just Prof if they happen to be a Professor.

>>3784
Depending on your accent, I would understand you flawlessly. So, breddy good.
>>
No. 3795
>>3785
> Like in Zuhörer?
Yes.
> Use Schüler or Student.
I agree with you but my book contains "Hörer" in texts.
> Again, use Schüler or Student.
Thank you.
> It might be better if you translate them to english so non Russian speakers know if it makes sense or not.
It will be a difficult task for me. I can make mistakes.
  1. Whom asks by the teacher? - The teacher is asking a listener (a student, a girl).
  2. What are you translating? - We are translating this text (this exercise, this sentence).
  3. We are studying a foreign language.
  4. The teacher is checking the homework.
  5. The listeners do mistakes.
  6. I understand this sentence (this word, this rule).
  7. Who translates the text correctly?
  8. Please, explain this rule!
  9. Read aloud the sentence one more time.
  10. Make examples and write these examples on the board.
  11. Write the date on the table.
>>3789
> So, breddy good.
I think it was "pretty good". If it is, than thank you!
>>
No. 3799
>>3795
A listener would be, for example, a part of an audience but no one would call the students or pupils an audience so Schüler or Student (depending on the school form) is definetly right.

The other stuff you did is good as it is.
>>
No. 3801
>>3799
Thank you!
>>
No. 3802
Merged.
>>
No. 3804
328 kB, 858 × 1669
Is this language threda? Are there any english speakers who also learn russian? I want radically improve my english and spoken english in paticular, but probably it be hard to me to talk with outer english speaking person who don't know basics russian
>>
No. 3849
>>3804
I started a couple of months ago to give myself something to do after finishing uni.

But I have at least a few months to go before I can have a proper conversation in it. I believe there's a Russian-speaking American who posts occasionally though.
>>
No. 3855
>>3804
Voluteering. I speak English at a native level.
>>
No. 3889
>>3804
>>3855
I speak Russian, German and English so I may be of service.
Well, I cannot into Cyrillic (or proper Russian grammer).
t. Soviet Spawn raised in Germoney
>>
No. 3890
10 kB, 184 × 184
>>3855
>>3889
Nice! It be nice to talk with you if I was not too shy
>>
No. 4035
Yet another exercise:
Ответьте на вопросы, употребите в ответе отрицание kein.
Answer the questions, use in the answers "kein".

  1. Haben Sie heute Übungen?
  2. Hast du eine Uhr?
  3. Haben Sie morgen Unterricht?
  4. Hat Wadim Krylow ein Wörterbuch?
  5. Haben Sie einen Bleistift?
  6. Hast du einen Kugelschreiber?
  7. Habt ihr heute eine Übersetzung?
  8. Haben Sie einen Freund?
  9. Hat Sie eine Freundin?
My answers:
  1. Nein, ich habe heute keine Übungen.
  2. Nein, ich habe keine Uhr.
  3. Nein, ich habe morgen keinen Unterricht.
  4. Nein, Wadim Krylow hat kein Wörterbuch.
  5. Nein, ich habe keinen Bleistift.
  6. Nein, ich habe keinen Kugelschreiber.
  7. Nein, wir haben heute keinen Übersetzung.
  8. Nein, ich habe keinen Freund.
  9. Nein, sie hat keine Freundin.
Please, help me with checking answers. Thank you for your attention!
>>
No. 4038
>>4035
>Nein, wir haben heute keinen Übersetzung.

To make it grammatically correct it should be

Nein, wir haben heute keine Übersetzung.

explaination (I'm not really into that stuff): Übersetzung is female, die Übersetzung, Unterricht is male therefore keinen Unterricht is correct
>>
No. 4039
>>4035
1. Nö.
2. Nope.
3. Naaheein.
4. Ne.
5. Nöhöö.
6. Boah, nerv nicht. Hab' nichts zum Schreiben mit.
7. Nein, wir haben heute keinen Übersetzung.
(The question actually sounds super stupid. Nobody would say/ask something like that. More like "Macht ihr heute Übersetzungen?" answer: "Ne, heute machen wir endlich mal keine Übersetzungen." → wrong verb in the question and the use of singular seems odd, but is correct language.)
8. Ruhig, Junge. Das geht dich nichts an.
9. ("What the fuck?" to the question again. Either it has to be "Haben Sie eine Freundin?" or "Hat er eine Freundin?". The latter, if it is a follow up question to the 8th question.
"Hat sie eine Freundin?" would be somewhat possible as well, but only if
- it is a follow up question to 8.
- "Freund" would be interpreted as gender neutral
- you answered 8th with "yes" or something
- the context would let the questioneer allow to know your friend is female
and in this case I have no idea why you would change to the feminine version of "Freund", if the previous one was meant as gender neutral… kick your teacher in the ass, honestly.)

outside of 7. and 9. everything is correct - I just had some fun.
>>
No. 4042
you could also troll the teacher and answer everything with:

Darauf gebe ich keine Antwort.
(I do not give an answer to that.)

Would create a nice little paradox. I would at least answer 8. and 9. with that. Those are private questions and you do not need to answer them. you are still fulfilling the exercise request of using "kein".
>>
No. 4043
>>4039
I am sorry. The ninth question is:
9. Hat sie eine Freundin?
>>
No. 4048
264 kB, 800 × 600
>>4043
in this case your answer is perfectly correct.
and the question… as well. just interpret the question out of any context and all is fine :3

yeah, just a single capital letter can change quite some stuff within the german language.
>>
No. 4059
>>4048
>yeah, just a single capital letter can change quite some stuff within the german language.
I have noticed it.
>>
No. 4087 Kontra
>>3889
Geh ins Brausebad, Volodya.
>>
No. 4089
92 kB, 1280 × 720
>>3889
>t. Soviet Spawn

>cannot into Cyrillic
>>
No. 4151
Place verb "haben" in appropriate form:
  1. Was haben Sie hier? - Ich habe einen Bleistift.
  2. Haben Sie auch einen Bleistift? - Nein, ich habe einen Kugelschreiber.
  3. Oleg Below hat ein Buch. Hast du auch ein Buch? - Nein, ich habe kein Buch.
  4. Wir haben Unterricht. Habt ihr auch Unterricht? - Ja, wir haben Unterricht.
  5. Der Lehrer fragt den Hörer: "Haben Sie eine Frage?" Der Hörer antwortet: "Nein, ich habe keine Frage."
  6. Habt ihr Hefte und Bücher?
  7. Er hat Hefte und Bücher.
Thank you for your attention!
>>
No. 4152
>>4035
>Haben Sie morgen Unterricht?

Remember that it's only "Sie" depending on who you talk with.

>Hat Sie eine Freundin?

If you don't talk directly to the person "Does she have a girlfriend" you write "sie" and not "Sie" with a capital S.
My answers:

>Nein, wir haben heute keinen Übersetzung.

It's "keine"

>>4151
That's fine.
>>
No. 4153
>>3784
>Lesen Sie den Satz noch einmal vor!
Lesen sie den Satz bitte noch einmal vor.
>>4035
>Nein, wir haben heute keinen Übersetzung.
keine
>>
No. 4154
>>4152
Thank you!
>>4153
>Lesen sie den Satz bitte noch einmal vor.
The original sentence can be translated from Russian to English as
"Read aloud the sentence one more time!"
It doesn't contain "please" word. So I wrote the translation without "bitte". Or it would be more polite to use "bitte"?
>>
No. 4176
>>4154
Would be more polite, but it would be wrong to add it when the word didn't appear in the russian sentence.

Also a lot of Germans (Swabians) are rude dickheads, so it's nicely translated.
>>
No. 4177
>>4176
>Would be more polite, but it would be wrong to add it when the word didn't appear in the russian sentence.
I think so.
>Also a lot of Germans (Swabians) are rude dickheads.
Is this your opinion or common opinion?
>>
No. 4178
>>4177
>Is this your opinion or common opinion?
I am not trolling. It is just interesting for me.
>>
No. 4199
>>4176
>Also a lot of Germans (Swabians) are rude dickheads, so it's nicely translated.

Wow, rude

>>4178
I live in that area and the people here aren't more and not less rude than the people in other places.
>>
No. 4207
>>4199
Thank you for answer!
>>
No. 4533 Kontra
>>3889
>I cannot into Cyrillic (or proper Russian grammer).
>t. Soviet Spawn raised in Germoney
shamefur display tbh. i forgot all russian i learned in school but i still can decipher cyrillic. t. ossi
>>
No. 5118
Hello, dear Ernstchan users! Ich brauche hilfe one more time. Please, check my answers.
Answer negatively following questions. Deny bold words.
Example: Arbeiten Sie heute? - Nein, ich arbeite nicht heute, sondern morgen.
1. Studieren Sie am Institut Deutsch?
2. Gehen Sie am Tage zum Unterricht?
3. Lesen Sie dieses Buch?
4. Hängt die Tabelle rechts?
5. Schreiben Sie schon?
6. Sind Sie Lehrer?
7. Besuchen Sie einen Fremdsprachenkurs?
My answers:
1. Nein, ich studiere am Institut nicht Deutsch, sondern Englisch.
2. Nein, ich gehe zum Unterricht nicht am Tage, sondern am Abend.
3. Nein, ich lese kein Buch, sondern ein Heft.
4. Nein, die Tabelle hängt nicht rechts, sondern links.
5. Nein, ich schreibe schon nicht, sondern lesen.
6. Nein, ich bin nicht Lehrer, sondern Student.
7. Nein, ich besuche keinen Fremdsprachenkurs, sondern die Schule.
Thank you!
>>
No. 5129
100 kB, 800 × 533
Not entire related to the threda, but might aswell make it a language general. I'm studying Russian and I decided to learn cursive cyrillic because I enjoy inflicting pain upon myself.

The book I'm using has examples of cursive cyrillic, however they look very artificial and not how a normal person would write it.
Would a Russian poster mind writing the alphabet in cursive cyrillic so I can see what a normal edition of it looks like?
>>
No. 5140 Kontra
>>5118
Alles richtig. Gut gemacht, Ernst!
>>
No. 5142
9 kB, 480 × 149
224 kB, 2560 × 1440
>>5129
In adulthood it depend on each person style. However, this is most standart that we learn in elementary school and mine personal cursive font when I used it last time 9000 years ago looks very close to this one. Sometimes there elements that was in soviet times but nobody uses anymore - in 2nd picture there example of lines under small ш and up from small т and also example of someone personal style.
>>
No. 5145
>>5142
Very nice. Thank you Rusernst.
>>
No. 5152
>>5118
>5. Nein, ich schreibe schon nicht, sondern lesen.

No.
Nein ich schreibe noch nicht, sondern lese.
>>
No. 5210
57 kB, 1280 × 720
>>5129
>Would a Russian poster mind writing the alphabet in cursive cyrillic so I can see what a normal edition of it looks like?
Of course.
>>
No. 5211
>>5140
>>5152
Thank you very much!
>>
No. 5214
>>5210
Spacibo, ruski drug!
>>
No. 5216
>>5214
You are welcome!
>>
No. 5464
Find antonyms and make sentences.
  1. rechts,
  2. oben,
  3. schnell,
  4. schwer,
  5. morgens,
  6. richtig,
  7. fragen,
  8. beginnen (vi),
  9. leise.
Please, check my answers.
My answers:
  1. rechts - links.
Ein Kühlschrank steht links.
2. oben - unten.
Die Mensa liegt unten.
3. schnell - langsam.
Dieser Student macht die Übung langsam.
4. schwer - leicht.
Die Hausaufgabe ist leicht.
5. morgens - abends.
Abends ich schaue deutschen Fernsehen.
6. richtig - falsch.
Die Studentin liest falsch vor.
7. fragen - antworten.
Die Studenten antworten richtig.
8. beginnen - beenden.
Sie können Arbeit beenden um 5 Uhr abends.
9. leise - laut.
Der Jung singt laut.
Thank you!
>>
No. 5466
>>5464
>Abends ich schaue deutschen Fernsehen.

Abends schaue ich deutsches Fernsehen.

>Sie können Arbeit beenden um 5 Uhr abends.

Sie können die Arbeit um 5 Uhr abends beenden.

Though I'd say 5pm is not in the evening but late afternoon

>Der Jung singt laut.

Der Junge singt laut.

Jung would actually be possible as some sort of dialect but every teacher would mark an R at the margin if you write it without the e.
>>
No. 5474
>>5466
>Abends schaue ich deutsches Fernsehen.
If I understand correctly, a verb must be on the second place in a not-question sentence, isn't it?
>Sie können die Arbeit um 5 Uhr abends beenden.
Why does "beenden" go after "um 5 Uhr abends"? Is there some rules?
>Though I'd say 5pm is not in the evening but late afternoon
Well, I wrote direct translation from russian "Вы можете закончить работу в пять часов вечера." So may be errors.
>Der Junge singt laut.
Yes, of course.
>but every teacher would mark an R at the margin if you write it without the e.
What does "R" mean? I googled a bit, but cannot find anything.
>>
No. 5491
>>5474
Sie können die Arbeit beenden would be a sentence. Now further information is added. 5 Uhr is a "Zeitergänzung". You just have to put such supplements between the elements of the original sentence.

Sorry but in German school we only know how to call sentence elements, not how they work. This is because borderline-underaged girls are teaching German.
>>
No. 5494
>>5491
Danke!
>>
No. 5499
>>5474
>If I understand correctly, a verb must be on the second place in a not-question sentence, isn't it?
Hmm. Not him, but I think I have a counterexample:

Im Märzen der Bauer die Rösslein einspannt.

Adverbiale Bestimmung, Subjekt, Objekt, Prädikat, and still seems to be fine.
>>
No. 5502
>>5499
I think in general. There are non-standard examples in any language of course.
>>
No. 5507
>>5499
>Im Märzen der Bauer die Rösslein einspannt.

So is this sentence taken from poetic literature? It sounds like a typical sentence rearrangement you have in poetic german

If so, literature in any language works with alienation / Verfremdung in order to be poetic and is therefore an artificial construct that falls under art not correct grammar

But anyway just read some Adorno and you will find out that sentence can be horrible by placing the verb of the main sentence near/at the end. Usually his sentences are a few lines long.

I cannot even say if there are rules for when it places 2nd and when at the end, kek.

Maybe passive/active forms?

>>5474
>What does "R" mean? I googled a bit, but cannot find anything.

It's a teachers/offical short for Rechtsschreibfehler. If you spell a word wrong the teacher will mark it with an R at the margin in schools/uni here
>>
No. 5520
>>5507
>taken from poetic literature
It's one of the most popular German folk songs. Are you Mohammed, Waldemar or Jim Bob Fitzroy Cooper III posting from Ramstein?

>alienation
You can be alienated by the unusual, but the unusual is not necessarily incorrect.

>not correct grammar
What kind of reasoning is that? "It's from poetry, so it's not correct grammar." The example might be wrong, but don't argue like that. Find a rule in a reference that is violated by the example.

>But anyway just read some Adorno
I refuse to do that.
>and you will find out that sentence can be horrible by placing the verb of the main sentence near/at the end
That makes it ugly, not wrong.

>maybe passive/active forms
>kek
That's one case. The passive voice is formed with the auxiliary verb "werden", which leads to split verbs were "werden" is in the second position, but the main verb is moved to the end of the sentence, with objects and maybe dependent clauses wedged in between. The finite verb (the part that's being conjugated) stays in the second position the other part of the verb is moved to the end of the sentence.

Example:
Peter schlägt den Hund. (word order like in English)
Der Hund wird von Peter geschlagen. (word order different from english 'the dog is hit by peter', the verb is split instead, close to 'the dog is by peter hit.')

Certain types of dependent clauses are another case were the verb is moved to the end of the sentence.

Example:
Ich glaube nicht, dass Peter den Hund schlägt.
The verb is situated at the end of the dependent clause.

But:
Peter behauptete, der Hund sei schuld an dem Unglück.
The verb is at the second position of the dependent clause.
>>
No. 5527
>>5520
>It's one of the most popular German folk songs. Are you Mohammed, Waldemar or Jim Bob Fitzroy Cooper III posting from Ramstein?

No, I just have no interest in german folk things. And I never heard of it in school. We had other music.

>You can be alienated by the unusual, but the unusual is not necessarily incorrect.
>What kind of reasoning is that? "It's from poetry, so it's not correct grammar." The example might be wrong, but don't argue like that

Depends on the foil, if you hold it against the german grammar foil, it is indeed incorrect structure IN THAT CASE but that does not make it bad or not understandable

Usually poetic language alienates from the everyday language and normal grammar, especially in poetry a folk song is poetry. That is one reason what makes it poetic in the first place and not just Hinz & Kunz talking their usual bs
In our case the verb is put at the end to make it rhyme with the next line so it becomes melodic which makes it pleasant to listen to and even easier to remember for the folks. It's called an Inversion in rhetorics and usually a writer will not just apply it randomly.

>Find a rule in a reference that is violated by the example.

I don't understand this really. You want me to find a rule that shows that the example is wrong?

But I gave you an explanation why a verb can be put at the end of a sentence in the german language, namely by using a rhetorical device that is very wide spread in (not just?) german poetry

>Im Märzen der Bauer die Rösslein einspannt.

Grammatically correct it would have to be

>Im März(en) spannt der Bauer die Rösslein ein.

It's just an effect of alienation applied, that makes it grammatically wrong (SPO-structure is the rule here I'd say) but enhances the level of poetry. Or do you think people spoke like that back then? literature of any shape is defined thru it being artificial or alienated from the normal language, which includes the use of inversions.

>Adornos long sentences in which the verb of the main sentences comes at the end after 5 lines and 3 parenthesis
>That makes it ugly, not wrong.

That is what I said. I said placing the verb at the end, even more so in long sentences with parenthesis, is
>horrible (to read)
>>
No. 5529 Kontra
>>5527
Addition:

Also *Ver*fremdung is not the same as *Ent*fremdung, the english languages uses the same term for both I think?
>>
No. 5534
>>5527
>a folk song is poetry
Where did I even deny that? Show me the quote.

>You want me to find a rule that shows that the example is wrong?
Yes. You claim it's wrong, proof it. I won't even read the rest of your post.
>>
No. 5539
>>5534
It was just a friendly reminder

>Yes. You claim it's wrong, proof it. I won't even read the rest of your post.

I did so. "Grammatical normality" foil hold against poetische Verfremdungseffekte how they are typical for your example

You example is a rhetorical device that involves altering the grammar to archive a poetic effect. Plain and simple boiled down.
>>
No. 5571
>>5539
>You example is a rhethorical device
>therefore, it's not a grammatically correct.
You reasoning is bullshit.
>>
No. 5575
>>5507
>>5520
Thank you for answers!
>>
No. 6532
I am continuing:
Translate to German:
  1. Ответьте на этот вопрос по-немецки!
Answer these questions German!
Beantworten Sie diese Fragen auf Deutsch!

2. Студенты отвечают сегодня правильно на все вопросы.
The students answer right for all question today.
Die Studenten antworten heute auf alle Fragen richtig.

3. На некоторые вопросы он отвечает неверно.
He answers some questions not right.
Er antwortet auf einige Fragen falsch.

4. Теперь ответьте на вопросы к тексту!
Now answer the questions for the text!
Antworten Sie auf die Fragen zum Text!

5. Я вхожу в комнату и открываю окно.
I enter the room and open the window.
Ich betraten das Zimmer und öffnete das Fenster.

6. Звенит звонок, и мы входим в аудиторию.
School bell rings and we enter to the auditorium.
Es läutet und wir betreten das Auditorium.

7. Почему ты не здороваешься с Петровым?
Why do you not greet Petrow?
Warum begrüßt du Petrow nicht?

8. Слушатели приветствуют учителя.
The audience greetings the teacher.
Die Zuhörer begrüßen der Lehrer.

9. Студенты читают этот текст хорошо; они обращают внимание на произношение.
The students read aloud this text good; they pay attention to pronunciation.
Die Studenten lesen diesen Text gut vor. Sie beachten die Aussprache.

10. Обратите внимание на это правило!
Pay attention to this rule!
Beachten Sie diese Regel!
Thank you!
>>
No. 6533
>>6532
>Ich betraten das Zimmer und öffnete das Fenster.

Ich betrete das Zimmer und lffne das Fenster/Ich betrat das Zimmer und öffnete das Fenster

>Die Zuhörer begrüßen der Lehrer.

Die Zuhörer begrüßen den Lehrer
>>
No. 6583
>>6533
>Ich betrete das Zimmer und lffne das Fenster/Ich betrat das Zimmer und öffnete das Fenster
Was ist "lffne"[\b]? Ich verstehe dieses Wort nicht.
>>
No. 6584
Was ist "lffne"? Ich verstehe dieses Wort nicht.
>>
No. 6585 Kontra
>>6584
typo, l and ö are next to each other on the german keyboard.
>>
No. 6587 Kontra
2,0 MB, 300 × 300, 0:01
>>6585
öpö^
^^^
^^
>>
No. 6588
>>6585
Thank you!

The second part of the exercise:

11. Что вам нужно?
What do you need?
Was brauchen Sie?

12. Ему нужна эта книга вечером.
He needs this book in the evening.
Er braucht dieses Buch am Abend.

13. Ей нужен карандаш.
She needs a pencil.
Sie braucht einen Bleistift.

14. Вам нужна сейчас ручка?
Do you need a pen now?
Brauchen Sie jetzt einen Kugelschreiber?

15. Я знаю эти слова, мне не нужен словарь.
I know these words, I don't need a dictionary.
Ich kenne diese Wörter, ich brauche kein Wörterbuch.

16. Нам нужен мел и губка.
We need some chalk and a sponge.
Wir brauchen Kreide und einen Schwamm.

17. Студентам не нужны сейчас словари.
The students don't need dictionaries now.
Die Studenten brauchen jetzt keine Wörterbücher.

18. Этот профессор владеет несколькими иностранными языками.
This professor knows a few foreign languages.
Dieser Professor beherrscht einige Fremdsprachen.

19. Она хорошо владеет немецким языком.
She know German well.
Sie beherrscht gut Deutsch.

20. Вы очень хорошо владеете английским языком.
You know English very well.
Sie beherrschen sehr gut Englisch.
>>
No. 6590
>>6588
>Sie beherrscht gut Deutsch.
Sie beherrschen Deutsch gut. // Du beherrscht Deutsch gut.

>Sie beherrschen sehr gut Englisch.
Sie beherrschen Englisch sehr gut. // Du beherrscht Englisch sehr gut.

>Do you need a pen now?
>Brauchen Sie jetzt einen Kugelschreiber?
It's correct, but "umgangssprachlich" it would be:
Brauchste nu 'n Kuli?
>>
No. 6593
>>6588
>Brauchen Sie jetzt einen Kugelschreiber?

Keep in mind that this is for a formal situation. Between students you say Du (informal)

informal german version:
Brauchst du (jetzt) einen Kugelschreiber Kulli is a widely used short?
>>
No. 6594 Kontra
>>6593
allight Duden says it's Kuli with just one l
>>
No. 6595
>>6590
>Sie beherrschen Deutsch gut.
In the original sentence means "she" - girl. So, I wrote "Sie beherrscht". This is not correct?
>Du beherrscht Deutsch gut.
In Duden (https://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/beherrschen) wrote: "du beherrschst". Typo?
>Brauchste nu 'n Kuli?
I think "nu" means "nun" and "'n" means "ein" or "einen"?
>>
No. 6596
>>6593
Thank you!
>>
No. 6597
>>6595
> >Sie beherrschen Deutsch gut.
>In the original sentence means "she" - girl. So, I wrote "Sie beherrscht". This is not correct?
oh, me stupid.
>She knows germal well. → Sie beherrscht Deutsch gut.
just sentence structure; "gut Deutsch" to "Deutsch gut"

> >Brauchste nu 'n Kuli?
>I think "nu" means "nun" and "'n" means "ein" or "einen"?
yes, correct. »'n« is »ein«, »'ne« → »eine«, »’nen« → »einen«; sometimes people just say »'n« instead of »'nen«, thou it is not grammatically correct (like in this case).
and »Brauchste« is »Brauchst du«

> >Du beherrscht Deutsch gut.
>In Duden (https://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/beherrschen) wrote: "du beherrschst". Typo?
???
>>
No. 6616
>>6583
Sorry, it's a typo.

öffne
>>
No. 6618
>>6597
Beherrscht is Präteritum, beherrschst is Präsens.

It's a really dumb word.
>>
No. 6713
Thank you for everyone!
>>
No. 6715
>>6594
Duden sort of went bonkers and starts to add slang and Kanak-german slang aswell. I am not a polsters, but one is better off starting to ignore it and search for better more reliable sources, especially when teaching foreigners.
>>
No. 6717
>>6715
That does not make it a bad source for looking up the correct spelling of a word.
I'm pretty sure they will mark it as slang word as what they are?
>>
No. 6888
Make question to emphasized words.
1. Die Studenten beantworten die Fragen langsam, aber richtig.
Wie schnell beantworten die Studenten die Fragen?

2. Die Zuhörerinnen betreten das Zimmer und begrüßen die Lehrerin.
Was betreten die Zuhörerinnen und wen begrüßen sie?

3. Kollege K. beachtet die Aussprache nicht.
Was beachtet Kollege K. nicht?

4. Ich brauche heute dieses Wörterbuch.
Was brauche ich heute?

5. Wir beherrschen Deutsch gut.
Was beherrschen wir gut?

6. Sie beschreibt das Bild auf Deutsch.
Was beschreibt sie auf Deutsch?

Thank you!
>>
No. 6912
>>6888
Oll korrekt.
>>
No. 6917
>>6912
Thank you very much!
>>
No. 7266
Talk about your study. Use follow phrases.
zur Vorlesung gehen, an der Universität studieren, die Sprache beherrschen, dreimal in der Woche, recht gut, recht interessant, zum Unterricht gehen, Platz nehmen, den Übungsraum betreten.

Ich bin Student. Ich studiere an der Moskauer Technologische Universität. Ich gehe zu Vorlesungen morgens. Ich studiere Mathematik, Programmierung und Fremdsprachen. Ich habe einen Sportunterricht dreimal in der Woche. Ich studiere Deutsch. Ich beherrsche die Sprache nicht recht gut, aber Deutsch ist recht interessant. Ich gehe zum Fremdsprachenunterricht einmal in der Woche. Wir studieren Deutsch im Übungsraum 318. Jeder Mittwoch wir gehen zur Universität. Wir betreten den Übungsraum 318, nehmen Platz, öffnen Bücher und Hefte. Es läutet um neun Uhr. Die Lehrerin betrat den Übungsraum und der Unterricht beginnt.

Please, check my grammar. Thank you!
>>
No. 7293
>>7266
7/10

Not everything is a real mistake but I try to make it perfect.

Ich bin Student und studiere an der Technologischen Universität Moskau. Ich gehe morgens zu Vorlesungen. Ich studiere Mathematik, Programmierung und Fremdsprachen. Ich habe dreimal in der Woche einen Sportunterricht . Ich studiere Deutsch. Ich beherrsche die Sprache nicht sehr gut, aber Deutsch ist recht (perfect use) interessant. Ich gehe einmal in der Woche zum Fremdsprachenunterricht. Wir studieren Deutsch im Übungsraum 318. Jeden Mittwoch wir gehen wir zur Universität. Wir betreten den Übungsraum 318, nehmen Platz, öffnen die Bücher und Hefte. Es läutet um neun Uhr. Die Lehrerin betritt den Übungsraum und der Unterricht beginnt.
>>
No. 7301
>>7293
I wanna had that in Germany we They are called Technische Universitäten, not technologische.

TU Dortmund, TU Berlin, TU Damrstadt, they are all known as Technische Universität.

>Wir betreten den Übungsraum 318, nehmen Platz, öffnen die Bücher und Hefte.

OP put it like this
>Wir betreten den Übungsraum 318, nehmen Platz, öffnen Bücher und Hefte

I think that is correct as well but you will have to only exchange the last comma with an und

like this:

Wir betreten den Übungsraum 318, nehmen Platz und öffnen Bücher und Hefte

which is perfectly fine
>>
No. 7348
OP cannot into syntax so OP should fix that, shouldn't take too long.
:3 <3
>>
No. 7350
>>7301
Using the article would be more appropriate. It's not like they are all opening masses of books. But that's so subtile, that most Germans wouldn't know, so we should say both is correct.
>>
No. 7353
>>7350
Indeed both is correct. I just wanted to point out that you can leave out the article and it would be fine too.
>>
No. 7354
815 kB, 985 × 1188
>>7353
I think the article may be a pointer which implies that everyone is opening his very own book instead of opening a lot of books.

Idk tho.
>>
No. 7543
Thank you for answers!
>>
No. 10890
Please, help me with an exercise:
Make nouns from next infinitives, and translate nouns to Russian.
Sample: tanzen — das Tanzen
lesen — das Lesen (reading, чтение)
springen — das Springen (jumping, прыгание)
singen — das Singen (singing, пение)
warten — das Warten (waiting, ожидание)
waschen — das Waschen (washing, стирка)
lernen — das Lernen (learning, обучение)
lächeln — das Lächeln (smiling, улыбание?)
gehen — das Gehen (going, ходьба)
sich rasieren — (I don't know how to make a noun from this.)
essen — das Essen (eating, поедание)
aufstehen — das Aufstehen (rising, подъём)
Thanks!
>>
No. 10895
Replace the marked words with synonyms.
1. Wann beginnt die Vorlesung?
Wann hebt die Vorlesung an?
2. Ich öffne das Fenster und beginne mit den Turnübungen.
Ich mache das Fenster auf und hebt mit den Turnübungen an.
3. Ich erwarte Sie am Sonntag um 7 Uhr.
Ich sehe entgegen Sie am Sonntag um 7 Uhr.
4. Punkt 7 läutet der Wecker.
Punkt 7 klingt der Wecker.
>>
No. 10896
>>10895
Replace the marked words with synonyms.
My answers are in parenthasis.
1. Wann beginnt die Vorlesung? (Wann hebt die Vorlesung an?)
2. Ich öffne das Fenster und beginne mit den Turnübungen. (Ich mache das Fenster auf und hebt mit den Turnübungen an.)
3. Ich erwarte Sie am Sonntag um 7 Uhr. (Ich sehe entgegen Sie am Sonntag um 7 Uhr.)
4. Punkt 7 läutet der Wecker. (Punkt 7 klingt der Wecker.)
>>
No. 10938
>>10890
>sich rasieren — (I don't know how to make a noun from this.)

Das Rasieren?

>>10895
>Wann hebt die Vorlesung an?

Wann fängt die Vorlesen an, "hebt" makes no sense. Same for #2.

>Ich sehe entgegen Sie am Sonntag um 7 Uhr.

Ich sehe Ihnen um 7 Uhr entgegen.

>Punkt 7 klingt der Wecker.

klingelt
>>
No. 10948
>>10938
Thank you very much!
>>
No. 12137
Please, check my answers:

Answer the questions:
1. Haben Sie eine Familie?
Ich habe eine Familie.

2. Ist Ihre Familie groß?
Meine Familie ist nicht groß.

3. Sind Ihre Eltern am Leben? Wie alt sind Ihre Eltern? Wie heißen sie?
Meine Eltern sind am Leben. Meine Mutter is 62 (zweiundsechzig) Jahre alt. Mein Vater is 77 (siebenundsiebzig) Jahre alt. Mein Vater heißt Ilimdar. Meine Mutter heißt Zulfia.

4. Sind Ihre Großeltern am Leben? Sind sie noch rüstig?
Meine Großeltern sind nicht am Leben.

5. Sind Sie verheiratet? Als was arbeitet Ihr Mann (Ihre Frau)?
Ich bin verheiratet. Meine Frau ist Alfia. Meine Frau arbeitet als Ärztin.

6. Haben Sie Kinder? Wie alt sind Ihre Kinder? Besucht Ihr Sohn (Ihre Tochter) die Schule?
Ich habe zwei Kinder. Mein Sohn ist 6 (sechs) Jahre alt und meine Tochter ist 4 (vier) Jahre alt. Meine Kinder sind nicht besuchen die Schule.

7. Haben Sie Geschwister? Wie viel Brüder und Schwestern haben Sie? Was machen sie: studieren sie oder arbeiten sie?
Ich habe Geschwister. Ich habe ein Bruder und eine Schwester. Mein Bruder arbeitet als Architekt. Meine Schwester arbeitet als Chemikerin.

8. Haben Sie in Moskau viele Verwandte?
Ich habe keine Verwandten in Moskau.

9. Besuchen Sie Ihre Tante, Ihren Onkel oft?
Ich besuche sie nicht oft.

10. Wann feiern Sie Geburtstag?
Ich feiere meinen Geburtstag am 10. April.

Thank you!
>>
No. 12140
>>12137
>3)

You forgot a t at the end of the ist

>Meine Großeltern sind nicht am Leben.

Every German would say
>Meine Großeltern sind nicht mehr am Leben.

>Meine Frau ist Alfia

Meine Frau heißt Alfia.

>Meine Kinder sind nicht besuchen die Schule

Meine Kinder besuchen die Schule noch nicht. this one implies they will do in the future
Meine Kinder besuchen keine Schule.

At the end of your negation you could add the sentence as bonus: Aber sie gehen in den Kindergarten. I suppose they do?

>Ich habe ein Bruder

Ich habe einen Bruder.

>Ich besuche sie nicht oft.

Nein, ich besuche sie nicht oft. Would sound better.
>>
No. 12148
>>12140
>I suppose they do?
Yes, thank you for answers!
>>
No. 13220
Use appropriate pronouns.
1. Er hat einen Freund. Das ist sein Freund.
2. Der Lehrer liest eine Zeitung. Das ist seine Zeitung.
3. Herr und Frau Braun haben ein Haus. Das ist ihr Haus.
4. Die Schülerin Iwanowa hat eine Schwester. Das ist ihre Schwester.
5. Du hast viele Bücher. Das sind deine Bücher.
6. Wir haben ein Buch, zwei Hefte und zwei Bleistifte. Das sind unser Buch, unsere Hefte und unsere Bleistifte.
7. Ich wohne oben. Mein Zimmer ist klein.
8. Wir haben heute Unterricht. Unser Lehrer kommt und die Stunde beginnt.
9. Sind Sie schon hier? Ist das Ihr Zimmer?
10. Hier sitzt der Student Karpow, da liegen sein Lehrbuch, sein Heft und seine Zeitung.
11. Hier sitzt die Studentin Pawlowa, da liegen ihr Buch, ihr Bleistift und ihre Zeitschrift.
12. Anna kommt heute nach Moskau. Morgen kommen auch ihr Bruder und ihre Schwester.
My answers marked through italic. Please, check my answers.
>>
No. 13222
>>13220
all fine
>>
No. 13223
>>13222
Thank you!
>>
No. 13725
Переведите на немецкий язык.
Translate in English.


1. Он едет в Липецк.
He goes to Lipetsk.
Er fährt nach Lipezk.

2. Ты тоже едешь в Липецк?
Do you go to Lipetsk too?
Fährst du nach Lipezk auch?

3. Этот студент говорит по-английский. Он очень хорошо читает и переводит.
This student speaks English. He reads and translates very well.
Dieser Student sprichst Englisch. Er liest und übersetzt sehr gut.

4. Она быстро бегает.
She runs fast.
Sie läuft schnell.

5. Катя берёт газету и читает её.
Kate takes a newspaper and reads it.
Kate nimmt eine Zeitung und liest sie.

6. Ты часто видишь своих родителей?
Do you often see your parents?
Hast du siehst oft deine Eltern?

7. Что ты держишь в руке?
What do you hold in your hand?
Was hältst du in deiner Hand?

8. Она часто забывает слова.
She often forgets words.
Sie oft vergisst Wörter.

9. Ты плохо читаешь текст.
You read this text bad.
Du liest den Text schlecht.

10. Кто берёт эту книгу?
Who takes this book?
Wer nimmt das Buch?

Thank you!
>>
No. 13726
>>13725
>2) Fährst du nach Lipezk auch?

Fäjrst du auch nach Lipezk? you don't mean Leipzig do you?

>3) Dieser Student sprichst Englisch

Dieser Student spricht Englisch.

>6) Hast du siehst oft deine Eltern?

Siehst du deine Eltern oft?

>8) Sie oft vergisst Wörter.

Sie vergisst oft Wörter.
>>
No. 13727 Kontra
>>13726
2) is Fährst ofc
>>
No. 13729
>>13726
>you don't mean Leipzig do you?
Yes, I don't. I mean https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lipezk
>>
No. 13763
>>13726
>you don't mean Leipzig do you?
Indeed, Leipzig and Lipezk have the same slavic origin.
>>
No. 13788
>>13726
Thank you!
>>
No. 13791 Kontra
>>13763
>>13780

Lipa = Linde

>From a Slavic name like "Lipsk", meaning "place of linden trees"; compare Lower Sorbian lipa. Early spellings of the name in Latin include Libzi, Lipzk and the standard Lipsia.
>>
No. 13801
144 kB, 1920 × 809
>>13791
>>13763
>"place of linden trees"
neat. the name leipzig originates from slavic "lipsk" indeed. the area is actually inhabited since the neolithic though. in 200 ad it was a (germanic) suebic settlement, romans called it "aregelia", however during the 6th century, after the franks had defeated the thuringian realm, incoming slavs would call it "lipsk". then the franks crushed the slavs/thuringians around 900-1000 again and frankish settlers would rename the fast growing city from "lipsk" to "leipzig" over time. leipzig's university is still called "alma mater lipsiensis".
>>
No. 17036
>>
No. 17045
25 kB, 500 × 500
>>13801
Unter den Linden, sollst du mich finden.

https://youtu.be/GVYxZthFJVo
>>
No. 17296
>>17036
Thank you!
>>
No. 18170
Use appropriate verb form.
1. Oleg, hier sind viele Fehler. (korrigieren) diese Fehler!
Oleg, hier sind viele Fehler. Korrigiere diese Fehler!

2. Du kennst die Regel schlecht. (wiederholen) diese Regel noch einmal!
Du kennst die Regel schlecht. Wiederhole diese Regel noch einmal!

3. Habt ihr heute frei? Dann (gehen) spazieren!
Habt ihr heute frei? Dann geht spazieren!

4. Sie lesen den Satz falsch. (lesen) Sie ihn bitte noch einmal!
Sie lesen den Satz falsch. Lesen Sie ihn bitte noch einmal!

5. Da ist dein Buch. (nehmen) es!
Da ist dein Buch. Nimm es!

6. Da ist deine Zeitung. (vergessen) sie nicht.
Da ist deine Zeitung. Vergiss sie nicht.

7. (geben) mir deinen Bleistift!
Gib mir deinen Bleistift!

8. (sprechen) bitte laut! Ich höre dich schlecht.
Sprich bitte laut!

9. (sprechen) bitte langsam! Ich verstehe dich nicht.
Sprich bitte langsam! Ich verstehe dich nicht.

10. (laufen) nicht so schnell, Inge.
Laufe nicht so schnell, Inge.

11. (sein) Sie so gut, wiederholen Sie bitte die Adresse noch einmal!
Seien Sie so gut, wiederholen Sie bitte die Adresse noch einmal!

Danke für die Hilfe!
>>
No. 18174
>>18170
All correct.

At 10. I was irritated at first, because it's correct but nobody says laufe, but lauf(') when it's an imperative.
>>
No. 18181
>>18174
Thank you!
>>
No. 18480
Answer the questions. Use possessive pronouns in your answers.
Example: Wessen Heft liegt da? — Da sitzt Peter, das ist sein Heft.

1. Wessen Buch ist das?
A: — Da sitzt Peter, das ist sein Buch.

2. Wessen Bleistift liegt hier?
A: — Da sitzt Inge, das ist ihr Bleistift.

3. Wessen Zeitung ist das?
A: — Da sitzt Walter, das ist seine Zeitung.

4. Wessen Zimmer ist oben?
A: — Eine Studentin lebt oben, das ist ihr Zimmer.

5. Wessen Tische stehen hier?
A: — Unsere Tische stehen hier.

6. Wessen Hefte liegen links?
A: — Das sind meine Freundins Hefte.

Please, check my answers. Thank you!
>>
No. 18482
>>18480
>6. Wessen Hefte liegen links?
A: — Das sind meine Freundins Hefte.

This is not correct.

Either:
>Das ist meine Freundin, das/es sind ihre Hefte

or

>Das/Es sind die Hefte meiner Freundin.
>>
No. 18485
>>18482
Or (though rarely would someone use this):
>Das sind meiner Freundin Hefte.

Again, technically correct but not practiced actively. The incorrect version that you might hear people say is "Das sind meiner Freundin ihre Hefte", which is a Dativ/Genetiv-Fuckup.
>>
No. 18522
>>18482
>>18485
Thank you!
>>
No. 18536
>>3248
ze Unterricht ist never aus ( Berndrule 74 )
>>
No. 18541
>>18480
Peter inge und Walter sind 78. Jahre alt was geht denn bei dir voll die Kartoffel Namen walla
>>
No. 18543
>>3248
is you learning at the Dr.Wolfenstein institute ?
>>
No. 18571 Kontra
>>18522
Don't worry if you are unable to understand >>18541, he is talking bydlo-German without any grammatical sensibility.
>>
No. 18647 Kontra
>>18571
He doesn't even know how to use punctuation and where his shift key is. OP is propably better in German language.