/int/ – No shittings during wörktime
„There is no place like home“

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Hail Odin! by Christenklatscher666

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No. 45215
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And space etc. Old one died.
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No. 45216 Kontra
Just so that we don't have it at the top of the thread here have some links because I have something like a hundred or hundred and fifty tabs open which I'm trying to clear at least some of them out so have some links. Btw trying to treat alcoholism with baclofen is absolutely fucking retarded but as a recovered alcoholic I actually found this pretty interesting that they repeat the exact same ratio of alcoholism across numerous species including rats, monkeys, and humans, and that it always comes back to the same number: 15%. I actually can relate very much to that GABA finding too btw because I am constantly tense, on edge, and running at an elevated stress level 24/7, so, yeah makes sense
https://getpocket.com/explore/item/a-landmark-study-on-the-origins-of-alcoholism?utm_source=pocket-newtab

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/humans-are-destroying-chimp-culture-180971664/

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/not-bad-science/fake-jewels-male-spiders-give-worthless-gifts-to-entice-females/

https://www.salon.com/2015/07/04/the_perfect_wolf_twenty_one_was_a_legend_he_never_lost_a_fight_and_he_never_killed_a_vanquished_rival/
theweek has the better article imo though
https://theweek.com/articles/577618/what-animals-think

https://gizmodo.com/scientists-study-headbanging-parrot-to-learn-why-music-1836081619/amp

https://www.popsci.com/octopuses-can-basically-tinker-with-their-own-genes-on-fly/
https://evolutionnews.org/2015/08/the_octopus_gen/
https://www.livescience.com/65495-low-oxygen-blinds-octopuses.html
https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/05/extinct-squid-relative-entombed-amber-100-million-years

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/05/fear-cats-bold-project-teaches-endangered-australian-animals-avoid-deadly-predator

https://www.rt.com/news/super-earths-habitable-zone-228/

https://news.sky.com/story/new-sky-map-reveals-hundreds-of-thousands-of-new-galaxies-11641944

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/open-minded-people-have-a-different-visual-perception-of-reality?utm_source=pocket-newtab

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/the-brutal-mirror
Jesus f'ing Christ how many of these tabs are there

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/when-a-mars-simulation-goes-wrong?utm_source=pocket-newtab
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No. 45268
57 kB, 600 × 450
>>45216
They'll say what they want but I feel more related to the parrot which is nuts, and has a more sophisticated sense of humour, than a monkey IMHO.

Godspeed with your recovery.
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No. 45271
I found this today. It is from 2015 and if you ever consider using anything but FLAC today you should be ashamed of your self.
https://romaco.ca/blog/2015/03/23/experimental-differences-in-audio-compression-formats/
The link comes from this video that is really good in it self. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IiZqYnd5g8M

It is interesting to hear that the 128bit mp3 is almost almost something you can listen to. It sounds like a very bad radio reception. It tells how much information is removed from the audio during compression.
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No. 45272 Kontra
>>45271
https://web.archive.org/web/20181229013109/https://people.xiph.org/~xiphmont/demo/neil-young.html

Forgot this one since it disappeared. Thank you wayback machine.

Basically more isn't necessary better when it comes to sound and sampling.
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No. 45274
>>45268
I havent had a drink in over two years. So thanks. And really man thank God I don't drink anymore. Even the retarded shit I must've said on /int/ while blackout drunk all those years. You literally cannot be a drunk and own nice things at the same time.
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No. 46136
So the other week (I forget how long ago sometime summer) I saw some guy riding what appeared to be a beat up single wheel, not sure what to call it. Self propelled mini skateboard thing with a foot pad in front and a foot pad behind the single barrel looking wheel. The guy was dressed in somekind of lower class flourescent vest too probably going to his bydlo job. Really what I meant about rundown tech tier.

I mention this because
https://youtu.be/JU9g16VIVM8?t=1009
in case you didn't hear a guy in a jetpack was fucking with our flights in LA.

The future truly is here. And it is every bit as shite as I expected it to be.
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No. 46138
541 kB, 640 × 266, 0:08
>>46136
>a guy in a jetpack was fucking with our flights in LA.
That pilot was a little freaked out, but the air traffic controller seemed relatively calm about the whole thing.
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No. 46139
>>46138
That's literally their job
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No. 46141
>>46139
Yeah, like 911 operators. They have to stay calm so that the person they're talking to will stay calm.
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No. 47341
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No. 47343
121 kB, 600 × 451
I recommend you guys watch SFIA (Science and Futurism with Isaac Arthur), it's pretty damn good.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZFipeZtQM5CKUjx6grh54g
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No. 48179
http://www.davidbrin.com/nonfiction/xenology2.html

You know fucking what after these last recent godawful years and considering how I literally can't even do that right now maybe I should just entirely abandon the concept of getting my Masters in something like foreign policy and instead actually go for something really interesting like xenology. Even biologist of some stripe at this point. Although looking back maybe I should have just gone into politics afterall and suffered and been jaded for it after having become irrelevant because I never sold out enough to get the money to win. Such cases.
https://www.wired.com/story/ideas-jason-pontin-genetic-engineering-for-mars/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Picatrix
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No. 48181 Kontra
This is actually one of a great many things which I would do or which would occur to me
https://venturebeat.com/2018/09/16/how-nucleic-acid-memory-could-be-used-to-store-data-in-dna/
and to similarly begin to initiate a long process of an uplift and of domesticating those carriers of The Message outward across the stars for some obscure purpose its carriers could only guess at

I Will find myself someday those creatures which are like me to aid me in each endeavor. I think my first objective should be quitting trivial things like the internet.
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No. 49408
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The current measurements of the Hubble constant have discrepancies which might indeed not be due to errors in the methods but could be the first step to discover a missing link:
>How can the Hubble discrepancy be interpreted?
>The standard cosmological model, which contains just six free parameters, allows us to extrapolate the evolution from the Big Bang to the present cosmos – period of almost 14 billion years. The model is based on certain assumptions: that space in the early universe was flat; that there are three neutrinos; that dark matter is very nonreactive; that dark energy is similar to the cosmological constant; and that there is no more complex physics. So one or perhaps a combination of these can be wrong. Knowing the original content of the universe and the physics, we should be able to measure how the universe was expanding in the past and what should be its present expansion rate. The fact that there is a discrepancy means that we don’t have the right understanding.

https://cerncourier.com/a/grappling-with-dark-energy/
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No. 49434 Kontra
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>>49408
>Our model with 6 free parameters leads to discrepancies
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No. 51270
9 kB, 172 × 200
Well this is just fascinating
https://www.cnn.com/2021/01/29/world/naked-mole-rat-accent-intl-scli-grm-scn/index.html
So it seems that the naked molerat is actually highly cooperative and pro-social but that it is also a highly xenophobic matriarchal society each with its own individual dialects. I did not know this and it is fascinating. Apparently their own common tongues start to break down in a period of anarchy if a small cell assassinates the queen and tries to install their own queen, almost kind of like how we each have our own different English based internet societies and you could immediately tell someone was vierkanal tier. I also didn't know that whales and primates etc. each develop their own insular dialects.
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No. 51292 Kontra
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>>51270
>Well this is just fascinating
Yeah, haha, there's actually a sci-fi anime called Shinsekai Yori where the evolution of warring molerat societies is one of the major plot points (main characters are mostly human though). There's more to it, but I don't wanna spoil too much, it's really good IMO.
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No. 51686
Could our universe have been birthed from the the vacuum decay within another universe after its false vacuum field collapsed?
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No. 51689
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An elegant technology from more civilized age.
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No. 51690
>>51689
I always disliked flip phones. Having to open and close it constantly seems annoying. 3310 reminds me more of my mom and dad's Siemens phones (A50, A55 or somesuch) which were probably just as unkillable.
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No. 51695
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>>51690
Oh no no no good sir, I assure you it definitely is not on purely aesthetic and visceral grounds. The most physically satisfying phone I ever owned was one where you had a mini antena you could pull out on a flip phone. I found that combination of motions equally as satisfactory as opening a switchblade. Was my switchblade more unwieldy than a nice fixed blade hunting knife? Yes. Did it eventually break? Yes, as did my flip phone eventually. However it stiol gave me that wondrous shhhhk that all other phones and knives would fail to do.
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No. 51698
>>51695
I am a simple man with simple joys, I have no use for those sophisticated delights. If I want to kill someone, instead of stabbing them stylishly with a switchblade, I'd rather bash their head in with a hammer. It may seem crude, but hey, it just works. Besides, the less unnecessary bells and whistles the device has, the less parts that can break.
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No. 51701
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>>51689
Here is my old flip phone, which I no longer have. It was tossed out during a cleaning spree, so now I only have these pics to remember it by ;_;. I loved that thing, and the build quality was incredible. It felt solid in my hand, indestructable.
3rd pic shows the cool startup animation.
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No. 51734
>>51690
>>51698
Yea, I know about some people dislike them, but I always had the opposite experience. All Flip phones I had I can open while I take them out of my pocket and moving to my ear using only one hand. I for sure know that when they are closed, no button will be pressed accidentally, so there was no reason to place an additional block on buttons. And you can look at the time or who calls you on a secondary screen. In the closed state, they are also more compact.

>>51701
Never had an LG phone. But clearly familiar with those kinds of animations lol.
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No. 51757
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Can we speak of science aesthetic and how it is fascinating?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vrT6r_CZ9Ag
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d2YNwUy18oQ

I cannot really put my finger on it spontanously, but I want to work on what it is one day. It's not the god complex, but the abstract approach, the operative functioning, systmatics.
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No. 51763
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I found this interesting video on de-extinction. More specifically de-extinction of the Thylacine.

He says that we have the technology to do this now, only that the technology itself is not advanced enough to do it within a practical time frame, but this is liable to change. But even so, these Thylacines will be the only thing of their ilk in existence, they will not have mummy Thylacines to teach them how to act or to hunt, but maybe after a few generations they will learn and pass it on to the next generations. Or maybe they will forever be entirely useless and rely on humans to feed them.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OYxUp8tERTo
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No. 51767
>>51763
The added problem to bringing things back would be if we had insufficient models of their gut flora. People always conveniently forget this fact. You cannot bring back a cow or a termite without replicating its microbiota, and likewise they pulled that genetic information from their mums, just like with guina pigs and wombats, along with their immunology which I suppose is somehow less relevant with a long extinct species facing new threats and where some of its old microbiotic threats haven't existed in a million years not just learned behavior, though true it's actually more important for at least mammalian species to have siblings or other youth of its own species to play with. But that of course brings in the other problem, which in 2020-2021 we can have the mainstream imagine that problem, which is do you really want to risk a zoonosis from bringing back an animal and its microbiota? Just imagine finding out that some form of bacteria that exists in their shit is opportunistic in human lungs.

It's a big problem I have with Westerners, which is down to their languages as much as ideologically or cultural traditions, that they tend to truncate the problem into smaller individuated pieces, not seeing the wing for the butterfly as it were, or the termite for its gut flora. I suspect this is part of why they are remarkably stupid when it comes to things like climate change and pandemics, because it's not just that multiple dynamic systems interacting with each other may require a higher IQ, but that to even fathom the concept of a cascade failure requires a type of thinking that is wildly unintuitive to the Westerner in a way it wouldn't be for say some Eastern or native American cultures. The very concept of interconnectedness appears foreign to them, and traps them all into linear thinking and hyper individualism.

In short, you need to realize bringing a species back requires wholistic and nonlinear thinking, and part of that is wondering how much their microflora matters, how much their microbiota poses a risk to not just us but any other lifr form already the melting permafrost in Russia is releasing long dead extinct anthrax spore strains, how much their own ecosystem is relied on by them, what would happen if one of our experiments escaped into the wild and so on.

Like if an alien came here and resurrected a modern human after 500 million years, what would it do with it? With none of our gut flora how does that work? With no functioning immune information about this new world, how can you keep it safe instead of in a hermetically sealed bubble? What new information can you truly learn from a resurrected extinct species that isn't clouded by the fact a human child would instantly learn and adopt a lot of your behavior and thinking, your language and your culture, as an alien species, and therefore be a bit more reminiscent of yourself than their own race? If you were an octopus in Numenera encountering the first human again, saying "oh. You're back." how do you deal with it?
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No. 51768
57 kB, 800 × 550
>>51767
>because it's not just that multiple dynamic systems interacting with each other may require a higher IQ, but that to even fathom the concept of a cascade failure requires a type of thinking that is wildly unintuitive to the Westerner in a way it wouldn't be for say some Eastern or native American cultures. The very concept of interconnectedness appears foreign to them, and traps them all into linear thinking and hyper individualism.

... I don't know that I would agree with this.

Asian foreign policy and internal policy is a complete mess and entirely lacks any kind of comprehension of any grander scheme or the interaction of systems. Even know it is only luck that has pulled them through and they still manage to shoot themselves in the foot. Just look at the grand plans of China, the plan to remove sparrows caused a famine and millions of deaths, the plan to forge iron in backyards caused deforestation and the melting down of huge amounts of iron tools, utensils and such to create useless scrap iron, their green belt was largely wiped out by a single disease, because it was made up of ONE kind of tree.

People from all nations can be stupid in this manner.
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No. 51774
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This week in space: SLS dood, SpaceX can't stop winning
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No. 51778
>>51768
I wasn't talking about the pseudo-Communist government of China though nor particularly Mao. China in particular suffered greatly under retarded charismatic authoritarian leadership. If you want to discuss China I'd think more about things like Buddhism, the Tao, possibly Confucianism, and ironically enough their governmental ideology (Chinese style Communism) was adopted from Westerners.
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No. 51783
>>51778
China didn't do any better under those ideologies either. Just holding together without going into civil war was a success for them.
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No. 51784 Kontra
>>51774
Right at this moment I am wondering how the world would look like in 20 years if we, the humanity, i.e. ALL humans, would only make decisions based on rational thought and deliberation and NEVER based on any kind of political shenanigans.
inb4 destroy humanity
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No. 51785
>>51784
It'd depend on whose goal was being pursued. The worst kind of tyranny can be entirely rational, as can the best kind of utopia. Actions are made 'rational' by working towards something. Not making any transcendental statement here, just that for example, a profit-driven organisation will consider non-profitable things irrational, for example really abstract high-end maths with very limited application outside of maths, while someone who is instead interested in the development of maths as a field, will find pursuit of those same things perfectly rational.

So 20 years of totally rational behaviour is honestly effectively as diverse as 20 years of irrational behaviour due to the amount of possible permutations.
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No. 51786
>>51785
This sadly is what rationality and irrationality pretty much came to mean in Capitalist societies, which I positively guarantee you will be what the form of "rationalism" would take on the wect were it to happen.
>he didn't push his own grandmother into the oven even though it costs him money to support her rather than making profit from sending her to crematory
>the man clearly belongs in a Nevada SaniToriumTM
You'd need to bring back the Enlightenment, which at present we have vast swathes of anti-Enlightenment jackasses calling themselves the "dark enlighnenment." In other words retards like Baked Alaska and Qanon. The same people believe in Social "Darwinism" and think of natural selection from the point of the strong lone wolf fallacy. So I'd agree that just rationality can in fact make it worse if your other parameters are already garbage.
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No. 51788 Kontra
Oh who you know what I just realized something: even though wormholes and warp travel is pretty much never realistically going to become a thing as far as we know, were there actually a way to open up a portal to the other side of the galaxy we could actually set up an observatory there that could actually look into our past. If we could somehow set up a powerful enough telescope array on another galaxy we could actually get to watch the dinosaurs on our planet. I don't know why this has never occurred to me before. I also don't know where there isn't any science fiction that I'm aware of which would take this into account, possibly because it's likely to break their own narratives. in 40K for example were they not so completely retarded would be able to watch the dark ages of man unfold very easily. The Eldar certainly would be the ones most likely to be doing this.

The key principles behind technology and science are never to try and brute force anything, nor break nature's laws, but rather make those laws work for you, like lift on an aircraft or air currents for galleons and other ships. Trying to paddle your way across the ocean or flap your arms is where the stupidity came in, so clearly this is the problem with most science fiction because they all seem to expect some way of brute forcing the problem towards relativistic speeds or opening wormholes that arguably would be a challenge for even Type III civilization were it even possible. But still.

I don't know why I never thought of this. Maybe because it's not particularly relevant in that the aforementioned problem remains of instantaneous travel, and would be like asking how to outrun your own voice in the 18th century, but still. Were we ever able to actually do a thing like that we'd undoubtedly have access to extremely high resolution instruments by then which could mean that even without the spooky physics of what happens to time through some of those methods, by unlocking that we could quite literally unlock the very past to this planet.

This actually occurred to me because I was thinking how we could've had more planetary bodies and never have any clue about it if one got ejected or fell into the sun beyond orbital perturbations anyway until it dawned on me that the light from our star from that era still hadn't reached other galaxies and our planet's light still wouldn't have reached elsewhere in the galaxy for tens of thousands of years. Which I suppose would create a more interesting and challenging question at that point, which is how could you look at the present without having to go there first?
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No. 51803
>>51786
If you mean the actual enlightenment, then sort of yes. If you mean the version that exists in STEM's collective memory, then hell no. People sometimes forget that the Enlightenment was as much about the Arts as it was science. I have no idea why, but it gets absurd at times.

What I mean by sort of yes is that the Enlightenment as a process in Western thought doesn't need to be brought back, but rather it needs a reinvigoration. Going back to paths already trodden is not going to fix the problems of today that arose directly or indirectly from those very paths in the first place. We need /an/ enlightenment, but one tailored to the problems of the age at hand.
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No. 51826
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DMTwbV9UqHA
What do people think of this crazy Russian's idea (Zimonev) to fight climate change by bringing back the wooly mammoth and populating Siberia with large ungulates and such?
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No. 51875
>>51826
Not the worst idea I've heard. The biggest problem about permafrost melting is that nobody even knows how big of a problem it might be.
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No. 51882
>>51875
Well we all do know it's extraordinarily bad, it's just a question of what level to bad it really is, which it may even be too late to solve regardless. Going across geological timescales our industrial revolution was essentially the timescale of detonating an atom bomb in human terms, and the resulting cascade failures and feedback loops which could happen we may already have triggered, in which case the cascade failure could simply be as slow moving and inevitable as a glacier moving across time. The real scary issue is if due to our extremely brief destruction terraforming the atmosphere that the feedback cycles may happen so suddenly and fast they are now operating on human timescales which would mean not only are we past that tipping point but that we can't do anything about it with new technologies.

I've talked about this before but the real truly scary thing to me is this possibility
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/12/151201094120.htm
If we plunge that much of phytoplankton beyond its temperature thresholds then it becomes another dynamic system failing and that in particular WILL kill us all. Keep in mind that our levels of atmospheric oxygen has fluctuated across billions of years as life gradually terraformed the planet, including the Great Oxygenation Event. It's entirely feasible we're but another brick in the geological wall of a species that arose, terraformed the earth, and killed itself, just like bacteria. This in fact could be one great filter, which is freakish to consider the fact we're essentially hitting half a dozen great filters in the span of only a few hundred years, which looking at earth life makes me extremely doubtful intelligent life is abundant in the universe because just our own species will have to survive climate change, nuclear war, artificial intelligence, genetic engineering, and certain other known, unknown, and theoretical risks in the brief span from 1800 to 2100 A.D. I'd even go so far as to posit that that's roughly the time frame each intelligent species has from discovering how to harness non-mechanical energy to reaching equilibrium and reasoned maturity or go extinct trying, which if our race is any indicator is highly unlikely and based as much on either sheer blind luck or willful and deliberate Divine Providence in order to stop it.

It also appears to keep following roughly some kind of a pattern or exponential rate of expansion, which I've seen some people posit as being more at that end point of technological singularity leading to AI and later ascendance of AI being a part of that evolutionary pattern when you break down geological history which tends to look a like the rate of rotation of an object in decaying orbit around its star, were it to continue circling that drain. I strongly suspect there's a pattern there too which is striking that bacteria to multicellular life seems to replicate downstream to the ratios of multicellular to more advanced and later intelligent life, to that ingelligent life making a leap to civilation, to time taken to leap to electronic civilization. I don't know.

But anyway yes point being that melting the permafrost could be that one final tipping point at which time everything forward would be an unstoppable chain reaction, ending in extinction of most complex life as the O2 concentration plummets. I'd actually also be concerned at just what extent an extremely rapid greenhouse effect can alter existence on the planet because typically the snowball earth and hothouse earths took at least hundreds of thousands of years if not millions of years to get there. As a general rule, sudden and violent changes to within a system do more damage than a gradual change in state.

I've also said this before but every time I look at Mars and Venus the more we learn the more it fills me with some kind of a primeval dread and fear, like the terror you might feel the longer you try and analyze with your mind and senses a Lovecraftian being and the longer you look at it and more deeply you understand the questions not answered the deeper the blackness of that terror.
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No. 51883
https://blog.usejournal.com/the-dark-forest-theory-of-the-universe-a52012529e0f
To extend this metaphor a bit further I would also actually posit a corollary: that because there are so many of these hunters out there and you don't know where they are, the exact last thing which you would want to do is open fire, and thus immediately draw the attention to yourself of the whole rest of the forest unless, of course, you were actually just hoping that that could become a mighty enough threat display to keep others from attacking you which particularly with any kind of AI civ might become like the World War Z theory of the dark forest universe. Of course, basic game theory indicates that if you do discharge your weapon, and therefore prove that you are a threat, it would just encourage all of the others to begin stalking YOU silently to fixate their attention on that threat elimination; I would even go so far as suggesting that this metric would over time evolutionarily eliminate those most loudly and violently aggressive species over time.

But as another corollary to that, if you are a silent hunter moving through the undergrowth of the universe, you can also actually accept one of the most basic premises of both earth life and bar fights, that is, no matter how big and bad you think that you are, there is always going to be somebody bigger, badder, meaner, and more willingly to accentuate the point they're trying to make with violence than you are. As such, it does indeed pay to speak softly and carry a big stick. However that being stated I would still posit that with wildly differentiating levels of technical development, it could become much more like you can safely presume yourself an armed hunter hidden deep in the forest, but that there may be tanks and mechanized infrantry, armed bears and much deadlier silent assassins like the difference between The Predator and some random GI in Vietnam, and just as likewise a bunch of jungle savages with at best pointy sticks if not just a few stray foxes and other animals.

As such, it could safely be inferred that you would not ever want to discharge your weapon except out of complete desperation the same way a spider or venomous animal absolutely would like to avoid having to inject its venom in you, because either you're going to be coming up against something you cannot possibly ever hope to defeat in direct conflict like taking potshots at fortified bunkers, tanks, or Predators, or up against something in which it's not even necessary. In such a dark forest universe those differential levels could actually mean that just by using your weapons each time that you hunt you actively run the risk of attracting the attention of something far more advanced than you are that could easily destroy you, and that something much less advanced than you are would never even merit wasting your ammo to draw attention to yourself by shooting at it to begin with.

As such I would overall say that over time even a dark forest galaxy wouldn't actually imply aggression on the part of other species, but rather quite the opposite. Hell if anything, it could actually mean that any hostile civilizations out there would be much more prone to becoming camouflaged ambush predators, trying to lure us out and trap us, perhaps akin to the way the Brethren Moons worked in deadspace, which could at worst be set up in such a way that anyone else in the universe detecting it might just assume it was another species that briefly attained civilization and then imploded itself on a great filter, than that it was actually being hunted to begin with unless of course you had to be careful with that because of the potential for someone or something tracking down the civ to pilfer its ruins and discovering either you or tracks leading to evidence of your existence.

Regardless I would agree that I've always found it colossally stupid that we would be broadcasting out location to anybody. You don't leave doors unlocked for a reason, you carry weapons at night in the forest for a reason, and you don't broadcast Hello World my ports are open with no antivirus or firewall for a reason either. It serves no damn good purpose at all and I think we're lucky how unlikely it is anything super advanced is within listening range so these stupid af damn trekkies don't have an opportunity to kill us all. I have no idea at all why any of these idiots think trying to blindly make contact with ayys and give them our address is a good idea--it's not. I'm hoping people like this and Stephen Hawking's warnings helped snap these reddit trekkie types out of their delusion and the ideas keep getting popularized for us to drop our nods and go radio dark out here until we've got a better idea what we're looking at out there.
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No. 51895
>>51883
I would say that a civilization advanced enough to defeat us would also be advanced enough to gather information quite effectively anyway. It would not be a dark forest as they would already know what we are capable of and what their neighbours were capable of. And then, if they felt that they could take us on and that there was a reason too they would, because their information would inform them that we are no threat and nor is anybody else.
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No. 51896 Kontra
>>51895
>nor is anybody else.

Actually that is irrelevant, my mistake. If they were advanced enough to defeat us and had the reason too they would be that powerful that a near peer in the area would not be able to attack them in turn anyway. As the forces they would sent would be relatively minor, it would be like the Spanish expedition to the new world.
>>
No. 51904
There was news about a Hot Neptune-ish class planet with discovered in 1.1AU from the α Centauri so most probably there are no earth-like planets in its habital zone.
>>
No. 51908
>>51895
They probably would be but the galaxy is a big place, the galaxy all the moreso. I as a sufficiently advanced intelligence with extremely keen eyesight still frequently miss a variety of animals as I'm strolling through the woods, in fact when it's especially getting dark out it's easy to fumble past things right next to you. Case in point, I once in daylight walked right up next to a fawn about a meter away from me. Didn't even know it was there, he was so still. I've walked dogs at night which come to think of it is strange I don't remember the dog reacting but something caught my eye or ear and I shined a flashlight off the side of the road and approximately three meters away from me was two glowing eyes which I rather quickly came to realize were a bit wide apart to be a raccoon or anything like that. I know I'm stretching out this metaphor to its limits but had I not shined my flashlight there and it not moved or done anything I'd of been clueless I even walked by a blackbear at all. You routinely don't notice shit in the forest unless it moves or makes a sound, which is typically done by moving. There's this strange, impossibly eerie feel you get in the wald sometimes when you feel like you are being watched.

Considering there's something like what, a billion stars in our galaxy across a breadth of a hundred thousand light years, it wouldn't be too hard to not notice something only a couple dozen light years away from your colony unless you're intently looking right at it.

Now I'll grant you that there's some pretty easy ways to check for a biosphere, however that's not what you'd necessarily be looking for, in fact had you pointed your scopes at earth any point there's a slim probability you'd be looking at us in that sliver of 200,000 years tops out of 3.9 billion that sapient apes were around, and in only something like 15,000 out of close to 4,000,000,000 of those years is there going to be civilization, with only 200 of those having an industrial revolution so anything farther out than 200 light years wouldn't even notice shit changing in our atmosphere from any known technologics unless they somehow had a way of light-faster-than-light sensors and communications. It could just be carbon based biosphere planet #839,679 for all anyone cares up til then, which sure maybe you'd pay more attention to monitoring itor maybe systems with a biosphere truly are exceedingly rare but it really would take a lot more effort to be actively monitoring every angle of the sky. More likely than not you'd just be checking for things like disruptions from antimatter technology, fission/fusion reactions on terrestrial planets, narrow spectroscopic bands of plutonium etc, certain changes in atmospheric composition suddenly, rapid dimming of planetary albedo, large uptic in other radiation like radio and microwave etc. rather than just hoping your blanket survey picks up on that, which true in a sense we'd already pretty much be fucked by anything in a hundred light year radius by now.

I'd still say it pretty much makes zero sense for us to be broadcasting ourselves like we're expecting them to detect it and start some AMA on reddit, and that those idiots absolutely would get us all killed. Remember, the majority may be peaceful, but it only takes one that is not.

It could however equally as likely be that there's simply no point to engaging us at all in which case we'd likely not have shit that we want, and that warring over things like territory and resources are among the main reasons for invading a planet and there simply isn't much here that's worth taking, or certainly not worth the bother of trying to take from them, unless we're low enough it's like even being aware of an ant hill somewhere that you want to strip mine. At any rate I see very little good that would likely come of it, and plenty of potential bad.

>>51896
This could be the other potential eventuality which is that traversing time and space like this is truly such an insurmountable challenge that they'd either be sending generation ships or operate like an interstallar colony which simply stripmines planets then packs the whole colony and leaves.

Of course the fact remains that the logical thing many races may end up deciding to do if they're not extra arrogant is to decide that any sufficiently advanced intelligence may not pose a threat now but could become one later and preempts it.

One of I think the most unfortunate possibilities is that for organic life it simply is not possible to spread and colonize things like we always imagined, and that the universe would be more filled with inorganics like artificial intelligence and uploaded minds in technology rather than finding life forms because you pretty much could just shoot something out across the stars and let it cruise for tens of thousands of years while just running everything off backup power because it can be extremely compact and you can possibly"turn off" all systems including thrust and just wait out the millenia. It would definitely solve both the hibernation problem and the massive chemical mass problem and attendant large complex systems in feeding anything on top of not needing to worry about psychological problems developing on generation ships. I suppose that the closest thing we could get for ourselves in the near future would more likely be a bunch of fertilized eggs and some kind of artificial womb system which likewise you could just eventually kick off all the power and let deep space serve as cryogenic storage until you need to automatically kick those back on when you approach target orbit, and just let some advanced AI effectively raise clutches of human infants while teaching them about where they've come from, rather than having actual adult human teams you'd somehow need to keep alive and sane for that long. It'd probably make it a lot easier for the human colonists to cope too since it's all they would have known.
>>
No. 51909
>>51908
Well now that you are talking in real scientific terms it makes even less sense.

As you say, travel is slow and laborious and informations moves incredibly slowly. Working with what we know it is actually incredibly unlikely that aliens would be hostile to each other. After all, it's not like you could spot earth, teleport a fleet, invade, colonise/mine and the leave again. Instead you could pick up old signal waves that are already out of date, send a ship that takes hundred or thousands of years to get there to even look at earth and by that time all information is well and truly out of date and sending it back to your planet takes a long time again. There is no way to know whether we have a rail gun on titan that will shoot ships as they enter our solar system or not(nor could they alert high command had they found one on arrival) and the cost that would go into sending a fleet capable of invading earth would be absolutely humongous as would the time it would take to arrive(and the cost and time it would take to transport any resources back). Most likely instead an alien race would send a ship simply to make contact as a novelty.
>>
No. 51911
>>51909
I would actually honestly say that the one truly sane thing (literally the only one) that UFOlogist types seem to believe is the theory about "greys needing our genetic codes." Which to be fair, that whole narrative is more indicative to me of a decayed race of future humans than actual ayys theoretically if you had stumbled upon true FTL tech you could also be stumbling upon keys to time travel also, were such a thing at all possible which it most likely isn't possibly not even for neutrinos but I digress.

The one and only actual thing which would merit such humongous costs involved truly would be that one most basic, precious, and rarest of all resources: life. I mean sure you could in theory sythesize anything from antimatter to genetic codes out of wholecloth if you're advanced enough, but what you likely cannot actually simulate is billions of years worth of evolution, and even if you could, it's highly unlikely with the best Quantum supercomputers trying to simulate it that you would actually have the foresight to come up with those creative parameters which maybe didn't occur to you to ask. The actual potential properties of life are incredible, from geoengineering to warfare to medicine, so it makes sense to me that you'd want to harvest some biological samples and send it off to some blacksite lab on the fringes of one your stellar systems.

Also all this is presupposing that there is some kind of a way to achieve true FTL fight exploiting some rules of physics we either don't know about or hadn't occurred to us yet, in the expectation that like with flight you had to synthesize multiple areas of knowldge to create a flying vehicle that indeed could take you from London to NYC in a few hours, or cross America in three hours. It's just that you can't phsyically flap your wings and to build such a machine requires advanced knowledge of hydrocarbons, piston or jet engines, lift and aerodynamics and so on. It's not inconceivable that like an early 19th century inventor or Van Gogh's flying machine that we simply have not yet assembled all the right parts of knowledge together in one systemetized matrix. Some people had vague ideas how things could work but even if they understood the basic premise was way outside of their own particular time and place, like if you told a 9th century Arab how to build a car engine and make such vehicles it would be meaningless to him because even if he truly could've understood it that requires the type of massive infrastructure to do everything from refine the oil to machine the individual parts that a whole empire would've needed to singlemindedly focus on it to make it happen and even then it is iffy. Sometimes it requires more than knowledge, and even if it didn't it requires the systematic and integrated knowledge of a whole arrangement of different fields.

Otherwise, it's truly a moot point because if we cannot find some way to actually do any of that we're all going to be trapped here on our own planets possibly forever. You can't brute force space travel and also even if you could achieve subliminal speeds going 0.3 C and ramming into a speck of dust on your way there will release the most tremendous explosion of energy we'd ever created. This is also the problem with solar sails because energy basically comes down to movement through time. The faster an object is physically going the more kinetic energy becomes the sort of problem that hitting the tiniest speck of matter will vaporize it. This is also why causing an inevitable chain reaction and Kessler syndrome is such a problem, because one screw traveling 17,800 mph will destroy about anything manmade it hits, and that's glacial speeds in space. So yes I agree that without some workaround, due to those factors true space travel would likely be impossible with current understanding. You would still need at basic minimum something like a forcefield or space version of train plows to move interstellar dust out of your way on top of needing drives fast enough to get you there, and the closing to lightspeed you make matter go the more colliding with even individual molecules of matter becomes a problem, and the less that is a problem the more sheer timescales become a problem even accounting for the difficulty of keeping lifeforms alive for the decades it would take in the void of space.

Also to use your analogy yes not all those ships arrived and not all the crew of the ones that got there were alive. Not only that, but you'd need said distant quarantined lab because even the most primitive life that's never been exposed to each other is an immediate extinction level event to one or both biospheres making contact, as we've seen with introducing European pathogens to South Americans or just about anything to Australia, and although we might not be at risk from each other's viruses and bacteria analogues to such an extent it's probable some sort of incurable funguslike thing could immediately begin colonizing a human substrates or something of ours growing wildly out of control there. So I suppose threat of that alone would be reason enough for sufficiently cold and survivalist minded beings to want to systematically destroy every living planet. honestly that would have made so much better a component to the Reapers story than the asinine AI/organics and starchild garbage it degraded into
>>
No. 51940
Why couldn't you just use quantum entanglement to take measurements and make observations from what is happening inside the singularity of a blackhole?
>>
No. 51952
>>51940
Has someone said it's not?

My spitball guess would be the same reason that we haven't used it as a kind of turbo morse code. Shit's fucky and theoretically possible at best right now.
>>
No. 51979
811 kB, 1280 × 1994
>>51940
Why don't you just meditate upon your own atomic structure?
>>
No. 51985 Kontra
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZZ4Slh4tFnE
I wonder, if we genetically engineered spiders too to be like some kind of domestic companion animal, could we use their web for ship repairs too?
>>
No. 55324
https://www.sciencealert.com/space-debris-has-damaged-the-international-space-station
And yet that idiot Musk wants to fill the place with satellites to fix a problem that doesn't exist. I really don't understand why anybodynamely redditors hang off that guy's nuts. He's only had a handful of genuinely good ideas and his Teslas are not one of them. I cannot imagine the damage hundreds of millions of lithium ion batteries strip mined then sent to landfills and being recharged by coal fired plants is going to do to the planet, even worse that he's on board with the plan to strip another remaining shred of our freedom and autonomy from us with self driving cars. We don't have GPUs partly because of him.

But anyway yeah some possibly Chinese anti-satellite weapon created piece of space junk just tore a hole into the ISS. This is a very real problem which needs real solutions. How come we don't have NASA well funded and working on it?
>>
No. 55326
>>51979
That comic was such a ride. I was simultaneously in awe of the crazy ideas and laughing because it was getting exceedingly sillier with every page and because of the, in part, bad art.
>>
No. 55336
>>51979
What comic is that?
>>
No. 55337
>>55336
It's called "Supergod", it's part alt-history - the brits shot people into space who then came back as a three-headed merged colossus - and part "what if everyone made their own six billion dollar man" with increasingly ridiculous superpowers.
I can storytime it, if someone is interested.
>>
No. 55478
If you don't need to sleep. Lecture about the Antikythera mechanism from Stanford.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xWVA6TeUKYU
>>
No. 56082
69 kB, 768 × 768
Wouldn't it just be extremely useful to have genetically engineered large domesticated frugivorous spiders on board a spaceship whose silk could be used to initiate all manner of lightweight onboard ship repairs and whose now otherwise useless venom could be used in the manufacture of medicines?

It just seems to me this could become a very good idea for generation ships, because a dog produces nothing and requires meat to live whereas a large 1 meter long domestic salticidae variant could provide something materially useful and not just companionship. Of course people born onboard a spaceship would have an easier time of being trapped in the depths of space with large dog sized spiders in a spaceship and could naturally just see them as friends and pets. We'd need to work out the friendliness pet kinks first but jumping spiders already are cute and intelligent and at least one known species basically eats fruit and vegetables. I could see them as being useful besides generation ships. I wish I could be a better artist so I could draw that, a man and his spider, holding his staff, on board the bridge of a spaceship staring out the large window vista into space as they finally make their approach to the new world.
>>
No. 56091 Kontra
>>56082
How much fruit would they need if they were of that size?
And how much time would you spend milking them?
And what to with excess?
Also, protein based materials are not suited for everything.
>>
No. 56097
30 kB, 445 × 399
>>56091
Well even at doge sizes a spider probably wouldn't need a whole lot, which if you're talking plant life is sustainable on generation ships in a way you pretty much can't with any additional non-human cargo/crew particularly those needing meat to survive. There are no real practical reasons for having a dog on board but you do need some sort of companion animals to keep stress and anxiety low. Of course, there is still the problem of being trapped in the depths of space with spiders on a starship which is indeed literal horror movie fuel so you have to make sure such a thing is very friendly, very dogelike. If you are having large agricultural productions then simply giving some fruits and such is not bad for taking out of the overall resource pool, if a companion animal and theoretically infinite materials production is the price.

Keeping in mind, that we're talking about out in the depths of space here. Shit breaks. There are no factories around for light years, no mineral mining, no productions anywhere out around here for lightyear after lightyear, which meaning you physically cannot replace shit you did not bring with you.

Having the capacity to essentially transform fruits grown with human dung into a sticky adhesive material both lighter and stronger than woven steel is essential if you are out in the depths of the vacuum's abyss for possibly literally hundreds of years. Just think about all things you rely upon entire national industrial capacities and infrastructure for, right down to your torn jeans and worn out shoes and broken appliances. Now you need to be totally self sufficient for centuries, and capable of producing things on your own with no help or outside resource at all. A spaceship spider's silk alone, capable of production at any time, would be worth it, not to mention how valuable it could be to manufacture medicine on top of that as every single gram of matter has to be accounted for both in spaceflight to orbit as well as for mass needing added propulsion to the next star and how much that tacks on additional energy cost as well as time, which itself tacks on materials and energy costs needed and anything to bring such a costs down is crucial. It could likewise be beneficial to bring a few conesnails for similar reasons however water is incredibly heavy and also a precious resource you may wish to use sparringly on any kind of clean saltwater environment now useless to the crew except as added emergency fuel. Just trying to calculate all extra resources to cultivate extra medicinal plants in place of foodcrops is going to be a nightmare, plus you have to factor in simple shit like clothes and whether you can afford to do it with cotton and flax and sheep, and whether then you waste so much more on livestock only to be given the choice to kill our resource draining animal for food now or get to have clothes for the next one hundred years.

With space spiders we somewhat solve that problem. I don't believe they need water as much and spiders often can go extended periods without food, which in case of fruit likely need little more water. I suppose you could eat them in an emergency too but, well, what does that really say about you when your hungry space ape descendents are the nightmares spiders fear?

And so as such yes I hereby propose to EC Inner Council the genetic modification and domestication of our future spider cosmonauts in the generation ships. I vote aye.
>>
No. 56099
375 kB, 841 × 685
I love radiation
>>
No. 56134
>>56099
To this day I actually wonder if we sometime several years ago got hit by an especially strong gamma ray burst from somewhere which wasn't devastating and was still distant but just stronger enough to deplete the ozone or something. I distinctly remember how the feeling of the sun on my skin was strange and alien a few years ago, which my mother agreed with me that it felt like needles and pinpricks rather than just being warmth. This strange stinging sensation I had from the sun was like 2015 to 2017 era iirc and lasted for like two years with just under 10 minutes in the sun if not considerably less felt like nettles. I had no exposure to phytotoxins best as I'm aware nor others with whom I spoke.

I wonder, did any of you also experience that sometime like maybe 5 years ago where the sun strangely felt harsh like needles with very brief exposure? I had no burns or reddening either.

Also onto the atmosphere I have concluded due either to tidal forces or earth's rotation or somesuch, the atmosphere must physically be allocated higher in bulges over the equator and lower in the northern hemisphere the further you go towards the poles. Russian skies always hang strangely too low to me. However big they say their skies are, clearly they are too low. I have actually experienced this too in places like New Hampshire where the sky feels much closer whereas in Texas and Los Angeles it feels very big, like the sky itself must be further up. My conclusion is these extensions are real, and that surely Brazil must have very big tall fat skies down there, as surely the beautiful big clean air on Costa Rica must be. I have never been to Mexico but I can only presume their skies are huge, while Norwegians and Swedes must make do with very low and thin skies.
>>
No. 56139
>>56097
You haven't answered a single one of my questions.
Also, you haven't mentioned how you would solve the breathing problem. Spiders belong to the tracheata and as such their size is directly proportional to the oxygen pressure of their environment. To have only dog-sized spiders you'd need to up that. I wouldn't want to live in a space coffin with highly combustible air.
>>
No. 56143
>>56134
>I wonder, did any of you also experience that sometime like maybe 5 years ago where the sun strangely felt harsh like needles with very brief exposure?
Frankly, no.
>>
No. 56439
4,9 MB, 462 × 360, 0:39
4,5 MB, 480 × 320, 1:43
959 kB, 640 × 480, 0:32
What you guys think about Anton Petrov's videos?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gw5ZHPWRUOg
Also, I hear he loses his apartment. Is there some kind of way we can statt gofund me or patreon accounts to keep funding him to make more videos or so he can not be distracted by some his abusive bydlo landlords? Can you even start gofundme or patreon from other countries? I don't know if such things are international in scope or if some regulation breaks it from donating.

Do you like his videos? What about PBS Spacetime and Kurzgesagt? Do you know any other real good space and science channels? I believe they call themselves "science communicators" or something like that. I wonder if I too could do this as a job.
>>
No. 56576
>>56439
> Can you even start gofundme or patreon from other countries?
Yes, there are many Russians with patreon.
>>
No. 56579
Economists, like mathematicians, also have co-authorship alphabetized by default. A 2006 research paper (https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/089533006776526085) by economics professors from Stanford and Caltech showed that faculty in top 35 U.S. economics departments “with earlier surname initials are significantly more likely to receive tenure at top ten economics departments, are significantly more likely to become fellows of the Econometric Society, and, to a lesser extent, are more likely to receive the Clark Medal and the Nobel Prize,” even after controlling for country of origin, ethnicity, religion or departmental fixed effects. The same effects were not observed in the psychology profession, where authorship is not alphabetized.
>>
No. 56606
116 kB, 1080 × 995
I wonder how further technological development wasn't a possibility to invent, if electrical phenomenon simply didn't happen. What would be the upper cap of human development?
I wonder if there are still groundbreaking discoveries of such a magnitude waiting to unfold. What unexpected and unstoppable development it will summon.

It induces some existential realize to imagine human development is determined by the material attributes of various metal alloys.
>>
No. 56659
>>56606
All of life is determined by the chemical attributes of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen etc.

The metals owe nothing to the gases, both are just different products of supernovae in the end.
>>
No. 56660 Kontra
>>56659
I thought he was talking about various technological prostheses like computers that definitely need metals to function the way they do.
>>
No. 56662
>>56660
>like computers that definitely need metals to function the way they do.
Depends on what kind of computer. The human brain can also be called a "computer", yet it has not metal in it - of course unless you meant metallic elements, in which case, yeah, since any living being has some metal in their body, of course even an organic computer would need any metal to function the way they do.
That said, if we are talking about machines in the sense of human-made and not living, why exactly do computers need metal? Because of their conductive properties? There are non-metallic conductors. There are organic semiconductors.
In principle, metals are not needed, it's just that currently metal-based computers are the most efficient and effective ones, but that doesn't mean that in the future we won't have computers that work on a whole other level while having no metallic parts in them.
>>
No. 56664 Kontra
>>56662
That is true, I think rephrasing it, it would be correct to say the universal Turing machine can be made of various materialities. At least I know that a wooden computer is possible. But ofc I was referring to what is commonly understood as computer, silicom based computing machines.

Also now I want to start reading that Biomedia book from 2004. Lately I found out that DNA can be used to save videos etc.
>>
No. 56667
>>56664
> Lately I found out that DNA can be used to save videos etc.
Yeah, DNA computers used to be a thing for a while, though when I read about it it was simple operations and stuff, but they argued they were really cool because a byte of DNA can potentially carry more information than a binary one. But I don't think anything ever came of it, since for saving stuff it might be ok (provided you manage to store it without degradation, which for example when using a living organism to carry the vector can lead to problems via mutations), but for "real-time" computing it wasn't really suited since you can't synthesize DNA as fast as needed.
>>
No. 56677
>>56659
Something about determinism in regards to the scope human development. Example of us not being able to develop electricity and thus not progressing along the same technological lines, metalic alloys are just a specific Upon looking this up, I now realize you could build a computer without any use of metals but maybe could have conditioned historical development enough that this would all be immaterial
>>
No. 56759
8,3 MB, 500 × 500, 0:19
>>
No. 57283
Today I rediscovered this channel.

In this video he makes meat berries.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FaVHTd9Ne_s
>>
No. 57854
1,2 MB, 2252 × 4000
438 kB, 1536 × 2048
The most powerful rocket in the history of mankind, assembled for the first time on a launch pad. Mars, here we come!
>>
No. 57869
>>57854
Biggest but not most powerfull IIRC
>Mars
Wait next 30 years for another flag placement.
>>
No. 57909
https://www.unqualified-reservations.org/2007/08/whats-wrong-with-cs-research/
THOUGHTS?
I personally can't assess this article, because situation in Russian academia is completely different 95% of PhDs are just evading conscript, so I'm asking someone with relevant experience to tell.
>>
No. 57983
205 kB, 800 × 600
>>57869
74 Meganewtons for 150 tons to LEO
>>
No. 57991
2,5 MB, 1:47
>>57854
What could just go wrong?
>>
No. 58083
143 kB, 1414 × 795
Just found out about the Vegas loop.
What the fuck? Is this real life? Just thinking about this thing drives me into "the world is a simulation" paranoid schizo mode.
It's a narrow tunnel... that cars drive around in a circle. Not even automated, driven by people. Sold as the next paradigm of transport infrastructure.
I thought only third world shitholes like ours had absolutely retarded publicly funded projects that are just excuses to steal taxes. Like astana expo 2017, or the "nanotechnologies" meme in russia.

This is pure ideology levels never before seen. I know there's a tendency in capitalism for products to gradually morph into ideologies being sold in the guise of products. But this is an entire infrastructure project being built as pre-text for ideology.

The ideology being "I hate traffic jams, but I hate being in the same vehicle as poor people even more". I guess building a separate lane for rich people only would be too overt, so they have to do it underground. And like any product-shaped-ideology, it doesn't even do the thing it promises. It's a fucking toy train ride like in an amusement park.

Best thing since the Juicero IMO.
>>
No. 58085 Kontra
>>58083
Tbh isn't this just public transport (subway) but made dumb? America, I...
But it is not surprising. America as home of individual mobility makes possible public transport infrastructure an individual enterprise.
>>
No. 58086
>>58085
It's way, way worse than that.
It's a 3km long tunnel with expensive cars slowly driving around, that is TOO NARROW FOR THE CARS TO OPEN THE DOORS. No ventilation system, no escape route, no safety measures at all. It's a death trap.

Just looking at it gives me flashbacks to cave diving horror stories. Just imagine if a vehicle gets stuck there. How did this get approved?
>>
No. 58087
101 kB, 760 × 553
>>58083
The best part might just be the RGB LED lights. Reading your post, I had assumed that you'd at least drive your own car there. Nope, you have your own independent contractor app slave driving you around. Fascinating stuff.
I can't make sense of this project, but I can find plenty of articles praising it for being high-tech. I think it's still missing some sort of blockchain technology integrated into the project, then we'd really have the future.
>>
No. 58088
43 kB, 1186 × 224
>>58086
>slowly
100mph
>TOO NARROW FOR THE CARS TO OPEN THE DOORS
12 foot
>>
No. 58089
>>58087
Holy fug are those tunnels covered in shitty 'hight-tech' pattern cladding too instead of just plain cladding or even just rendering? This just keeps getting better :-DDD
>>
No. 58090
>>58088
>100mph
my bad, 60mph
100kmph
always forget about base 60
>>
No. 58091
I you've used public transport before you know very well public transport is not a great idea :D
>>
No. 58092
>>58088
Just watch a video of it driving instead of quoting from their own website.
It's just 6 teslas rolling around in a circle like an amusement park ride.

>>58087
The project is a genius business move, actually.
Other companies have to pay convention centers for their marketing booths, exhibitions, stages, etc. Elon Musk managed to build his tesla marketing attraction on someone else's dime.
>>
No. 58093
49 kB, 500 × 500
>>58092
Dogg, you're right - it is a permanent exhibition booth.
>>
No. 58095
>>58087
Interesting that they promised full self driving cars by now, but even in their self-built, linear tunnel with no obstacles, they have to have human drivers.

I think self driving cars will go the way of graphene, cold fusion, nanotechnologies, and other "soon coming soon three cups of three" revolutionary technologies.
>>
No. 58096
>>58092
>Just watch a video
provide
>just 6 teslas
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=djfYafWFWtk
62 teslas
>>
No. 58097
>>58096
though speed 35mph
>>
No. 58098 Kontra
It's funny how people still buy into all this high tech shit, while a lot of it is just rhetorics. Business hypes that have consequences but not the revolutionary ones dreamed up marketing speak and singularity.
>>
No. 58099 Kontra
>>58096
I'm speechless tbh. 144 people/h, WOW. This really is underground public transport but with private train compartments like in the early days of rail.

Also on a funny side note is the gamer aesthetic but changing LED lights. Capitalism really breeds innovation you guys.
>>
No. 58100
>>58097
So, about the speed limit on a regular-ass street road? This is just an underground lane that took 4 years to build.

>>58096
So, maximum carrying capacity is 186 people. For 3km. And 62 drivers. And 62 engines.
Also consider the loading/unloading, stopping on stations, etc., and the real speed of getting from A to B is even lower than 30 mph. It actually doesn't matter how fast you go, when you're bottlenecked at stopping for 1 minute per 3 people per car. trains and buses circumvent that bottleneck by loading many people at once. It doesn't make sense to have 60 cars drive in circles in a tunnel, with periodic stops. The whole point of cars is to go in any direction you want.

3 buses on a special bus lane can beat that metric for 1% of the cost.

>>58091
Hot take: public transport is only bad because it has to share the road with automobiles.
>>
No. 58101
>>58099
If you wanna see REAL innovation, google juicero. $700 juicer IoT that can only work with their own juice packets, which have DRM attached. Best part, the fruits in the pack are already pre-juiced, and you can squeeze the juice out just with your hands.

It's such a profoundly retarded concept, yet it god bajillions in funding, because when venture capitalists hear "Iot" and "Monetization", they instantly ejaculate in their pants.
>>
No. 58102
>>58100
I am quite sure these all are just temporal restrictions
Also public transport not connected with automobile roads is still not so good in a megapolis in rush hours
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No. 58110
13,2 MB, 426 × 240, 5:45
>>58083
=DDDD
WTF
must be 146IQ marketing move or I don't know what

>>58100
With public transport you rely on public services much more than with car. In 3-rd world countries with dysfunctional government this can be problem. You know, when some official says "throw away your cars, give us money and we will steal it give public transport for you", this raises suspicion.

In USA there is a another problem. All their infrastructure is already set up for cars. How are you gonna fix it? Put a bus line from Suburb A to Suburb B? It will cover a very few people per each km. Such fundamental changes still happen, but very slowly.

However, in my opinion, in long run public transport is the future. Just like public power lines, public water supply and so on. This includes taxi and car-sharing. And, I hope, self-driving car-sharing.
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No. 58115
Man, if public transport was even viable in my city (it's not 24 hours, and doesn't have amazing coverage), I wouldn't own a car. Having one is convenient, but honestly it's a big money sink when you account for petrol, rego, insurance, roadworthy checks and servicing. That doesn't include random costs wiping out most of a week's pay, like how this morning in the pitch black I tripped and fell onto the side mirror and snapped it off. Random accident has put a legitimate "I can't afford this shit" stress on my shoulders.

Conversely, when I lived on one of the few good bus lines in the city, it was pretty damn stress free and even with our overpriced tickets came out cheaper overall I'd say.
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No. 58170
>>58110
>bus uses different infrastructure than cars
What the fuck
Is bus Russian for trolley or something? Speaking of which they ripped out almost all the trolley tracks and gutted our rail pretty much because big oil and the automotive industry owned America or rather its politicians at that point. It was one of the dumbest moves we ever did and people will be mystified at how such great advancement civilization as the ancient Americans whose flag is still on the moon can be so consistently fucking retarded.

I'm equally mystified why Elon wants to do stupid shit like build underground tunnels in Florida which is going to be underwater soon, start a Kessler Syndrome with his dumb satellites we don't even fucking have reason to use for much shittier internet than DSL that most people have now even rural areas, and why he wants everything wrong with switching to privately owned corporation AI driven lithium battery cars. Seriously now that is stupid. Every fucking day at 5:00pm the electrical grid will go down while we pump even moar CO2 into the atmosphere burning fucking coal to charge his mobile toxic waste dumps which are going to kill lots of people from exploding lithium battery housefires in the near future. Oh, and the stupid fat autistic cunt wants us to start even moar tyrannical coups in LatAm in order to get the lithium. I could understand him doing it in France but here it's unspeakably fucking retarded.

But back to your point no. We had rail. Our system fell into disrepair and all funds being pulled. We still have some rail lines. Nice but costly. Bus is super cheap. You can go from NYC to DC for like $14 on one of them. Mainstream busline is like $60 or something for such a thing.

Local bus meanwhile exist in every city and they are cheap. Super cheap, also usually reliable. Large urban centers have a metro. Also is fast, cheap, reliable. These only don't work as well in super spread out urban sprawl suburbs like the DFW metroplex area but even then cars do not work super well sometimes either and cars flat out do not function at all for dense urban infrastructure or metro areas like LA and NYC. You sit in your car for 2 hours during traffic congestion how lovely.

I will tell you real reason for cars here is ultimately the same stupid reason Chinese have hours long 8 lane highway blockages and that's because of chasing social status. It's exactly the same stupid reason a bunch of retarded twats will spend a thousand dollars on high interest credit to get a surveillance device aka iPhone which is for social status posturing, and the bigger, more expensive, more useless the thing is the better, the crown twatmobile being the hummer.

No believe me our infrastructure works better for buses than for cars though you are right oil/automative industries made my country incredibly retarded. I'd mention freedom but now that every car has some surveillance device like OnStar and GPS that doesn't really exist anymore; you have more freedom and anonymity on a metro line in a certain sense now. AI shitmobiles will erase any of that.
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No. 58690
Why we do not pour research funding into glorious Georgian/Russian bioteknik?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d-v8uSG2ewk
Seriously I want to put some of my personal American dollars onto buying stocks of any company which is making a serious pursuit of bacteriophage research. Apparently now there's strains of antibiotic resistant bubonic plague in Madagascar. Antibiotic resistance is one of the most highly spooky topics in science right now. We have plague in Arizona and New Mexico too.
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No. 58843
if light is a wave, then what is the medium it propagates through? aether?

or is it the good old case of "the observations fit this mathematical model, but there is no interpretation, so shut the fuck up and crunch the numbers lol"
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No. 58849
>>58843
As far as I know only mechanical waves like sound require a medium for propagation, that's why loudly exploding spaceships are a meme. Electromagnetic waves like light do not require any medium. So, I guess they propagate just through spacetime or whatever.
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No. 58854 Kontra
>>58843
Fields? where is the phd physician?
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No. 58861
>>58843
What do you mean by "interpretation"? I seems to me, that you imply explanation which fits common sense intuition like "waves are spread through some medium".
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No. 58865
>>58854
My Dx: quantum fields with a side of benign tumours.

Serious not space is firstly not a true vacuum although not I think that it matters, and secondly you mean physicist.
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No. 58880
>>58849
>>58861
I guess what I'm getting at is, what is a "wave"?
Is it a phenomenon that can be modeled with math, or a mathematical concept that is expressed in certain phenomena?

Aside from that they can be modeled with the same math, sound and light waves don't have anything in common. So what is the source of that one commonality? The platonic ideal of a wave?

I'm trying to come up with a high level interpretation that doesn't just revert into neo-platonism again.
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No. 58881
>>58880
Light is not a wave, it's a particle.
Light is not a particle, it's a wave.
Light is both.
Light is [insert quantum shenanigans].

At least for applications that use light you can get a working model by assuming a particle quality for light and that the light source is constantly emitting photons.

For example with plants (e.g. microalgae) you can get a rather precise model of light exposure by treating it like a shower of photons, get the density of that photo shower, how far they will travel inside the medium (if we're talking about algae reactors) and so on.
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No. 59585
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No. 59600
135 kB, 1280 × 720
62 kB, 959 × 719
I remember during the early days of EC there was a discussion on whether self driving cars will be viable in the near future.

Well, I guess we know now, because the technology has basically stalled at the level of a primitive autopilot. Until there's another big breakthrough in computer vision and AI, it's dead on arrival. Meanwhile there's billions invested into this stillborn industry.

Like, entire self driving taxi services being launched. The funny thing is, they don't perform any better than an open source computer vision + self driving system you can install on an android phone. Somebody's making big bucks taking money from investors, just to download tensorflow and some computer vision libraries, and then sell that shit to car companies.
The prospect of completely self driving cars died the first time one caused a fatal accident, even with a human sitting at the wheel as a failsafe. Turns out, a human who hast to sit and do nothing for hours loses focus and concentration, and doesn't react in time when a car fails to notice a pedestrian.
Their genius solution? Have TWO people sit in the car watching the road. Self driving my ass.

Pretty decent investment scam. Can't wait to ride my self-driving car running off a graphene supercomputer fueled by 50% more efficient batteries that are totally coming soon. It's almost here lads.

"Private sector innovation" is the stupidest fucking meme that people still believe. Publicly funded innovation made computers, the internet, Unix, GPS, etc. Private sector "innovation" involves tech bros taking public academic research in AI and computer vision, stuffing it into a car, adding a subscription mode, and then killing people on the roads. And of course, cars running in a circle in a narrow tunnel under a convention center. Driven by humans btw.
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No. 59603
>>59600
The problem with self-driving cars is the following: it's not enough that they perform better than humans and engage in car accidents less often. Because in accident with human driver it's easy to put the blame on him. Meanwhile any such case with AI will raise a shitstorm. Because what you gonna do with it? Jail developer? Manager? CEO? But on the other hand they did nothing wrong if they made AI which is safer than human. So now they have to use human drivers as scapegoats for legal reasons.

> The funny thing is, they don't perform any better than an open source computer vision + self driving system you can install on an android phone.
Where do you get this from? Because I'm also curious about it, but I don't think there is a public information about how do they perform.
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No. 59604
2,4 MB, 2000 × 1269
>>59603
I'm not sure if they are safe enough to be worth it. They're safer than the average road raging retard driver, but I think a vigilant, properly trained, responsible driver would do just as well. Mostly because they don't have the problem of mistaking a puddle for a person, and getting rear ended after they hard break.
My totalitarian gommunist solution would be to make qualifications for driving much higher, and invest in public infrastructure so that people too retarded to be allowed to drive could still commute.
I think the problem with self-driving cars is that it is yet another instance of a market solution failing to address problems that need public infrastructure. But businesses won't invest in the public even if it benefits them.
I'd see self driving cars if there was infrastructure built to address their shortcomings. Like special markings on roads, special signs, require cars to have special markings, etc. Self driving cars can't cope in a chaotic free for all environment.
But at that point, just make trams and metros and bike lanes and shit. Fuck cars in general. I want to live in a city where every street looks like pic related.
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No. 59605
>>59603
re: open source self driving
https://github.com/commaai/openpilot
This software is used by multiple companies offering plug and play self driving solutions and of course there's DIY shit too. Essentially they sell android based dash-cams with a decently powerful CPU, which connect to a modern car's universal port, and offer self driving capabilities. No tesla or other top of the line expensive bullshit cars required.

Here's a review and it holds its own against a tesla:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Y67XKPmtY8
With just ONE camera.
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No. 59623
>>59603
The problem with them is it's yet another dystopian vision where the corporation owns your car, the corporation and therefore also the government fully owns and controls where you can go, can remotely kill the ignition, it's like a fucking fed GPS tracking device 24/7 you were dumb enough to pay a premium to get. These cattle are lining up with wallets open to pay for their chains.

I absolutely demand freedom and independence, as well as privacy that should be a Constitutionally enshrined right and the EU beat us on. That being stated I'm at the point now where if I cannot have freedom anyway I demand free rent, free utilities, medical and dental care, and my own personal dacha. Barring that it should've been takbir time the minute they started popularizing pocket snitches aka computerized full spectrum monitoring devices aka "smart" phones. I can't even begin to imagine the horror that awaits us when they finally succeed in outlawing old legacy vehicles that don't have OnStat or AI.
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No. 59627
1,7 MB, 1450 × 1080
59 kB, 576 × 382
>>59605
Wow, seems like Russia really STRONK. Because Russian AI can drive without human failsafe.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GWlPWMAHBRs
There was an American obsessed about investing in Russia -- here is his chance.

>>59623
You will own nothing and you will be happy! =D
Let's hope it won't be so bad and we will have something like picrelated as an option.

t. surrendered and bought smartphone 2 weeks ago
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No. 59642
17,6 MB, 640 × 360, 4:20
>>59627
>dat license plate
ayy lmao what are you some kind of a poorfag lmao you need the newest highest end nVidia® graphics cardTM what you don't even have a basic RTX 4090 or something
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No. 59643 Kontra
Seriously though fuck nVidia. No, I can't help it, I need to autistically screech about something.
I generally come to detest them as a company and what I can gather is a supremely toxic corporate culture that is really the ones directly responsible for fucking us in the ass. nVidia on their own probably contributed 20% mindshare towards me growing so jaded with Capitalism, as well as other tech companies and just the videogaming industry in general. They've been consistently trying to normalize utterly absurd price gouging every generation, and now due to the market being totally fucked and people being complete idiots paying for it anyway, between silicon shortages, scalpers, cryptomining and all the other bullshit, we are never going to see a $500 midrange graphics card again.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tsNL3y6YBXg

Also just everything about them kind of sucks and people only put up with it because of certain productive tasks and their decade long streak of great raw performance that just ended. The problem with that is, nVidia always played this con on people to come out with "the fastest GPU" like some shitty Titan or 80ti cardin terms of actual price to performance 2080ti is trashit had driver issues and bugs on release too so between a $400 AMD card and a $1100 nVidia card, I'd be a lot more upset about the other card being fucked with higher expectation of general quality just so they can say "we have the fastest GPU" because they knew the average gamer was dumb enough to associate a 60 level card with "being faster." In reality, AMD had a strong hold on the segment most people buy cards at for years.

I will say though that some of their older cards from really great lines like Maxwell although they couldn't even help but to fuck that up and get sued too and Pascal will work great with just a i7 3770k or 4770k or something like that, or even some cheap AMD chip back when they were a dumpster fire. Even so, 3.5gb will age like absolute shit and basically I can't think of a reason to buy from them at this point unless you have oligarch wealth to burn. I do like at least somewhat effort to push certain things forward in tech but I still do not see the reason to adopt raytracing and find it absurd they're pushing upscalers that only even exist because their gimmick ran at 30 fucking fps at 1080p on a 2080ti without it.

Just imagine that. Imagine paying $1200 on a graphics card because you got hoodwinked by some gimmick and finding out you're getting 30fps at 1080p with it. Meanwhile they deploy DLSS1.0 which is an insult on top of a joke.

Needless to say I ultimately made the full system switch for a reason, although I still don't find as much wrong with Intel other than the premium pricing while falling behind not just in efficient speed but also ridiculous feature sets like top m.2 disabled on a $50 more expensive board, no PCIe 4.0, overall shittiness with lanes and functionality and so on, and then they didn't even include a cooler. I'm still leery of one company having control over all this stuffwhich is why we should root against the ARM deal but AMD really is pulling through as the better GPU choice too.

I basically see it as entirely their bullshit "protecting the brand" mentality over raw substance, which was always true to one extent but now I feel like there's nothing underneath it. Ampere was a shitshow. RT is just not compelling enough an argument for me to get first price gouged by nVidia, and the price gouged again by their AIBs. Case in point, I almost spent over $600 on a 2070 super. I just wanted my precious triple fan setup but they all looked like shit to meh. EVGA had the least worst one. Then I really delved into reviews and realized I'd basically be paying $200 extra for maybe couple fps better performance in a few games and a gimmick I didn't actually care about and year later still don't. I almost never encounter it and when I do it's some random thing like Amid Evil where I don't care anyway.

Basically to me the whole point boiled down to having that green GTX logo on some level. That's really pretty much it, and it's still kinda a waste of money even used, and that is accounting for when AMD used to be shit at making GPUs. I've been thankful for getting my RDNA card ever since, with each month making me more and more grateful I didn't do something stupid like waste money on nVidia or JustWait for the next gen launch. Even just looking back on all the older cards it's clear to me that unless you're buying like a used 1080ti or 980ti for something reasonable then the better choice would've been me going for RX 480 or a 570 or something like thatwere it not for mining fucking everything.

Yes I think their software sucks. Because it does. There's a reason everybody uses a program literally called MSI Afterburner and not their own software, which I'm happy about Adrenalin 2020 in a way I never would've imagined. I actually use it literally every single day. It's fantastic. This is a far cry from the mindblowing shittiness of something like Catalyst.

I can understand if you're doing all kinds of video editing and productivity wanting it, or some kind of highly specific AI research, but otherwise what a scam.

Someone I think brick asked if Tesla and all that self driving stuff was a complete scam and who was doing the swindling, and yes the answer is partly nVidia from what I understand. Complete shitshow of a company, wrapped in fancy looking green LEDs and a shiny box. Well, if the box doesn't suck. It's incredibly trivial but my ASRock card's packaging and materials felt premium as well, and I had premium performance ever since. The thing still beats an RTX 3060 ffs.

At this point I am basically just waiting for RDNA3 to launch and am somewhat excited about it, although the MCM design does make me kinda leery. I have no idea how latency or any kind of driver or other problems could end up impacting it by them starting to switch to a chiplet design, but hey they already proven themselves with Ryzen so unless it costs as much as a used car I'm thinking of getting a 7800XT or 7700XT in like a year and switching to a 4k 144hz panel if I can.

All that being stated they are all soulless money grubbing companies of course and also you really don't need super high end hardware imho. Basically everything I play should work on a GTX 970 at 1080p with few exceptions, and it wasn't that big a deal to me playing at 900p or lower for years.

>>59600
Yeah it was you.
Sorry you had to see this. I just see that and immediately think yeah, fuck nVidia. We put up with them just because of performance and them not being so openly brazen as Turing came out fucking everyone. Now I see all these idiots trying desperately to pay $800 for a 3060 because durr durr "da green one go fasta" and actually getting worse performance than I do, and probably partly because all the prebuilts have the exact same shitty 3060's in them, usually EVGA, sometimes Asus or a 3070 or something. Of course AMD actually has to have some available too. This gen I would've bought a 6800XT no doubt no regretsbut only if it cost me under $700. But it would be pointless because there's maybe like one or two games I even have that would have a point without getting a new monitor.

God I love technology so damn much. Why does tech have to suck such fucking ass.
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No. 59667
>>59643
I'm laughing right now. It isn't like this is a major surprise for anyone. Also TL;DR.
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No. 59740 Kontra
468 kB, 1400 × 1104
482 kB, 570 × 2045
2,1 MB, 3024 × 4032
1,1 MB, 2856 × 2142
oh, right it was just a second technology thread where topics converged

>>59667
Well I wrote a textwall again and never ended up posting it but yes anything art, technology, computer/vidya etc. topics tl;dr textwall is my default posting mode, and believe it or not I often read other textwalls regardless if I have anything to say to them or not.

I can rant on that and what bad value Intel or nVidia but I want to add that, suffice to say my dream rig was actually an Intel and nVidia build just because I wanted to have "the best" someday, but by the time I actually got around to the upgrades and building my own custom system it was a very weird moment in time when Intel went to complete shit and so did nVidia. I had every single intention of going with Intel until after going online a lot people talked me out of it, because I stopped paying attention and didn't know how far they'd fallen. People still spoke of nVidia with this weird conviction, as if that green logo was all that mattered, until I finally came to realize that my custom dream PC rig with muh shiny fancy brand new nVidia card was...an absolutely retarded idea.

I even was considering SLI as "a feature" at that point with a positive checkmark next to 2070 Super when I started looking to build. Yeah. That is how out of it I was at the time. A feature that lets you pay more money so you can then pay more nVidia money later.

So as a result I ended up not buying my dream PC with nVidia rig, because I realized what pants on head retarded value that it was. Not a day has gone by without me being extraordinarily happy with my 5700XT Taichi. Its mining is beastly too, and I ended up in the hilarious position of something I thought would tank value every year ended up being worth over twice as much within half a year of buying it. Because my panel is 75hz I've found barely anything at all which my card doesn't max out at 1440p. I at times think what if I got Intel, could I get higher performance, but then I realize the amount of extra money I'd have to spend would just end up being as much as two tiers higher AMD anyway.

So just wanting to point that part out. I didn't hate AMD, I just associated them with low tier poorfag among poorfags quality--and that was true for a time. I had bad experiences with ATI/Radeon laptops in the past afterall, and well Bulldozer, Excavator etc. I didn't realize how much things dramatically changed. I was never a fanboy about Intel or whateverafterall I look down on anything with sports team soccer hooligan mentality with utter disdain, including politics and corporate fanboyism but I really want muh 5ghz overclock, which is the only poor thing I have to say about AMD, that they have no real overclocks at all and "OCing" AMD basically just amounts to adjusting a manual turbo boost; that I was unhappy with because I wanted muh high end VRMs to matter more.

But in the end I realized it was just better this way for this peculiar generational time period. I got awesome flexibility except maybe nVidia having an edge on certain video editing tasks, but otherwise my performance is great, my upgrade pathway great. I can just go 5900x later and maybe RDNA3 unless AMD massively fucks up their MCM chiplet design and/or nVidia finally gets its shit together and offers the kind of efficient high end performance that makes them even worth the bother.

ah shit I am doing it again sorry. I am the kind of person who unironically looks at old motherboards for fun, and gains immense satisfaction looking at some old high end z77 or x99 board in my spare time please excuse this