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No. 46851
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is Ernst interestee in martial arts?

I used to train Karate with my father and recently decided to pick it up again.

And as with all asian martial arts there are a lot of misconceptions and mystique surrounding it, mostly because of movies and such.

Fun fact, the "Chi/Ki" was never supposed to be a mystical inner energy you could draw from to get magic strength.

Rather it's a controlled breathing technique that once you train you can use to give your punches and kicks a bit of an extra oomph.

It doesn't substitute strength training at all.

Another thing people mix up is Zen buddhism philosophy and martial arts. It emphasises passiveness and self defense when in fact those martial arts were much morr aggressive in nature, born out of the need to subjugate, kill and maim other people.

During the Japanese Warring States period, an early form of ju jutsu was developed in in mainland japan, prioritizing joint locks and throws over striking because the armor would generally render striking innefficient.

After Toyotomi rose to power and started confiscating swords from peasants, they were still plagued by bandits and pirates so they needed to defend themselves without weapons.

In the japanese island of Okinawa, early forms of Karate have originated, heavily influenced by chinese kung fu.

After the Meiji Restoration, all forms of fighting were outlawed in an attempt from the Emperor to "civilize" Japan.

The only way the martial arts could still go on would be to distance themselves from a discipline of war and adopt a more passive approach to it. (Aikijujutsu became Aikido, jujutsu became judo) It heavily attached to the Zen buddhism philosophy, which was popular at the time, basically stripped the "fangs" of the fighting styles and adopted a more peaceful approach.

In karate, you can still see some of those "fangs" in some Katas, moves like eye goughing, arm and leg breaks, kicks to the groin, etc.
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No. 46852
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I did karate as a kid but not for long. I missed the test to get my yellow belt and shortly after i stopped.
I only remember that it smelled like feet in there.
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No. 46853
>>46852
Sames here.

I also practiced it as a child, I guess it instills discipline in young kids and it's something I terribly need in this trying times
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No. 46856
102 kB, 1200 × 1200
Did also start Karate a few years ago but sadly had to stop due to injuries. Did it until green belt, and it was fun, kinda miss it. A good all-around training, and the kata part adds some training for the mind, too. Also the people in karate dojos are usually normal guys, which is not necessarily the case in your average muay thai / kickbox club. I don't want to entertain stereotypes here, but for reasons I've seen the average attendance of both, and there undeniably is a difference.

Fun fact: Karate actually means "empty hand", and Karate-do is the way of the empty hand, with empty meaning having no weapon. Kendo for example is the way of the sword. Also: Those fancy japanese names for all the kicks and punches are totally lame when you translate them. I only know the german translations, so please forgive mistakes, but for example the punches Oi-Zuki and Gyaku-Zuki only means "same-side punch" and "opposing-side punch", and they only literally describe if punch arm and front leg are on the same side or not. Same with kicks, Mae-Geri and Yoko-Geri mean "forward kick" and "side kick".

Kata names are nice, though, at least in Shotokan style which I practiced (which Ryu and Ken also did, so it's best :DD). For example there is "The Swallow's Flight" (Empi), "Love and Kindness" (Jion) or the "Crane on the Rock" (Gankaku). It's a semi-contact sport, so no need to be afraid of it. I got roughed up a lot more in the ball sports I did. Another fun fact: Johnny Cage's default stance in Mortal Kombat is Gedan Barai (low sweeping block, another of those shitty names). At least the internet says so, couldn't find a single video where it looks like he does it.
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No. 46857
>>46851
I don't train now, but did so as a child. The class even went to a tournament once. I enjoyed it for a while, but quit after my orange belt. Because of those classes, I'll always remember how to count to 10 in Japanese. I also remember my uncle, who had trained himself in martial arts his entire life, wanted to fight my instructor for some reason. Maybe he wanted to test his own skills, or maybe it was to see if the instructor was any good. My uncle was fast, and had this 'flying scissor' takedown that was incredible. The two never did fight, though.

Oh, here's a video of that move, which I first saw demonstrated in our small kitchen.

Flying Scissor Sweep
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zX2zz-aswc8

Good luck with your training, Ernst.
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No. 46858
>>46856
What style did you use to practice?
My style is Shotokan.

I remember also being really disappointed on the names.
I really like Bassai Dai kata which means literally "Tear down the Fortress". (It's a kata aimed at overpowering a stronger opponent)

If I'm not mistaken, in Shaolin Monks Sub Zero uses Shotokan as well. the stance and punches looks like its taken from the Tekki series of Kata.
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No. 46859
>>46857
>>46857
>also remember my uncle, who had trained himself in martial arts his entire life, wanted to fight my instructor for some reason

Ego massaging happens here as well. Stuff like my style > your style. I used to think black belts and senseis had a good self perception amd wisdom ( and some do ) but there's always that glimpse of pride.

I remember some guy or two from other school would come over to "train" (actually to lock horns with the master and question his lessons).

My friend invited me for a class with his Sensei and I remember him belittling and making fun of how I was taught, how I should come to his dojo and learn true karate. It was really uncomfortable.

>that scissor move

can't wait to learn stuff like this.

looks awesome as fuck
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No. 46860
practiced taekwondo (itf) when i was in my early/late teens, but quit training before achieving black belt, because i moved to a big city during apprenticeship. back then i used to kinda look down on the judoka and greco-roman wrestlers a bit, but now as a middle aged man i find myself watching judo, sumo and grappling competitions on youtube more often than tkd fights.
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No. 46861
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>>46858
>What style did you use to practice? My style is Shotokan.
Shotokan-brofist, and yes, Bassai Dai is a banger. Quick and forceful, nice to show off. Unfortunately, as a green belt (more like an orange belt, because I had to quit shortly after the green belt exam), you normally never get to try it. But in our small club there were two training days a week, and at the second one not many people participated - but I almost always did, so everyone practiced together. No separation of the groups in apprentices (everyone up to green) and advanced (purple and above), so I practiced with the black belts. When it came to katas, the sensais basically said to me: "Just look what the others are doing and try your best". I did, but I still was embarrassed by running around like the n00b I was, so I started to learn them at home. At the end, I knew how to do all Heian-katas, Tekki Shodan, Bassai Dai and Jion I think, and I also knew the german translations of all the katas. It was fun when the sensai actually asked about that, and the black belts were standing around clueless while Mr. Orange dabbed on them :DD

Also fondly remember my orange belt exam, where we had a really good sensai from another club as instructor. During warmup we did Heian Yondan (what is purple level), and for the above reasons I already knew it. We were lined up sorted by belt color, and the other yellow belts were freestyling, while I actually did Heian Yondan. Sensai walked up to us, looked at me: "Why do you know how to do that?" - "Have to, because I sometimes have to practice with the higher ranks". "Which club are you from?" - "$myClub, SIR!", of course with pride in my voice, knowing that I just did honor to my dojo and my sensais :DD

Also, I always thought that in Brazil Capoeira is the hot shit! But that is probably the same stupid belief like that in Germany everyone wears Lederhosen™
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No. 46862
I'm doing HEMA and it's quite fun and very exhausting due to the protective gear.
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No. 46863
>>46862
do you guys practice unarmed combat also in hema or is it all about swords, shields, halberds, chain mail and stuff exclusively?
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No. 46864
Used to teach MMA in high school. Now I'm just an out of shape useless cunt.

Not as mad as I should be. Youd be surprised how far a bar attitude and a bit of swagger will take you in terms of deterring people. They just now think I'll shank them and leave em in a skip instead of just bashenings.
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No. 46917
>>46863
I know how to throw a good punch if our range is too close but we do not learn how to wrestle like it is shown in manuscripts.
Hopefully it will change.
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No. 46919
In my humble opinion, all combat sports are stupid and evil, evenif they look awesome
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No. 46921
>>46917
thankfully a number of hema sword fighting styles are alive and well today, but it would be really cool if the same could be said about hema wrestling/grappling styles, like shown in e.g. talhoffer's manuscript. we could have ju-jutsu/judo vs. hema fights then, although it surely would take a while if hema wrestling masters could rival the likes of kyuzo mifune or shohei ono.
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No. 46945
I did a wee bit Karate as a kid, but it was Shotokan and gay as fuck.

Then long time nothing until I started Kickboxing in my 20s. It was good fun, but I am not really flexible.

Then I moved and did regular boxing for a bit, which I really like.

After moving again, I tried longsword fencing. It's great fun, but apart from the trainer there was only one other person who did any sports outside of this and the rest was fat/skeleton nerds of the type you would expect to be into that kind of stuff. Felt bad having to practice with someone like that if you had to take a break after a single lane.
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No. 46980
>>46945
The longsword trainer should maybe introduce warm ups that give basic endurance - and scare away most lvl 82 wizard/warrior dual class players

Why is Shotokan gay? I don't know about Karate.
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No. 47032
>>46980
Oh don't worry, we do a proper warmup as you would in every other combat sport or sports practice in general. But since we're all nice and everyone at their own pace blablabla those that can't just walk instead of jog.

Shotokan karate - at least the way we practiced it - was a square stance, endless katas and virtually no real life application. Stuff like stopping before hitting the enemy and such, things you can do with women and children. If you like doing movements it's ok, like Tai Chi, but for actual combat stuff you'd need to find one of those 70s karate dudes who regularly beat each other up.
Then there is for example Kyokushin karate, whose founder basically just liked to beat people up and developed the style in that direction. Legend has it he punched a bull unconscious. Kyokushin tournaments are full contact and a foot to the face is common.