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No. 63407
35 kB, 701 × 500
Ernst, how can a cyber attack be "minutes away" from shutting down Australias power supply?

Is there any possible exaplanation, that this comment is factually correct?

Ernst tries to imagine how IT people in the electricity company are able to detect an intrusion and stop the attack, knowing that they did so just in time?

Do power companies have some sort of intrusion detection system? Are they scanning incoming and outcoming IPs? Did they realise that there is an open connection to a Chinese IP through the MSSQL port? Did they shut down their internet connection to investigate? How do they know what exactly the attackers had planned?

Or were the attackers already in the system (e.g., weak teamviewer password), and trying to get access to the internal control panel through bruteforce?

The claim was made by the following politician. Would he have a reason to lie?

Joshua Anthony Frydenberg is an Australian politician who has been federal treasurer and deputy leader of the Liberal Party since August 2018. He has been a Member of Parliament for Kooyong since the 2010 election.
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No. 63408 Kontra
I find it hard to believe 2bh.
Okay, the PLA hacks the powerplant and shuts it down? Then what? What's the point?
Just a military exercise "just in case" or what?
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No. 63409
Frydenburg's a fucken dipshit, and hasn't really shown his honesty, just like his boss Scomo (the Pants-Shitting Liar). Also, our media engine is going full acceleration with kinetic war in the region. With tensions as they are right now, the normal flyover/cyberattack that under most circumstances is business as usual becomes some spark for war against Chyna. However, I'm sure it's just coincidence that these are such a big deal coming into an election when the Libs are trying to use nuclear submarines to sell a "we'll protect you from China" line.

Tbh, the more pressing concern with Australia's strategic position is that we still run on a just-in-time supply chain for fuggen fuel. One bad interruption and we'd have really bad fuel issues within a month. That could happen from anything though, so the jingoists don't give a fuck.
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No. 63415
>>63409
Mate, Australia isn't even able to produce its own AdBlue. It's simple urea for trucks and tractors, so just as vital as fuel itself.

Australia has one of the biggest gas reserves, which is necessary for the production of ammonium fertilizer. Urea is a byproduct.

You might think that Australia can produce its own fertilizer and urea. But nope, only one fertilizer plant remaining. Somewhere in Queensland. Is about to be shut down because gas prices are a bit too high. China can sell for a fraction cheaper, so this Queensland plant will also be shut down.

Maybe they are going to produce green ammonia, which doesn't require fossile gas. But who knows if and when that will work.

Fuck politicians. Selling out the country like this. Just put an import tax on such vital goods and let your own country compete with global supply. But no, let's bleed out the country in the first place, but then protect it with "nuclear submarines". We don't even have the know how to maintain this technology.

>Oy mate, can you chuck me some more plutonium rods?
<For fuuuuuuucks sake, get ya own bloody rods ya lazy bastard
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No. 63416
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No. 63417
For me the most important information in that statement is this:

>Mr Frydenberg said Australia's intelligence and law enforcement agencies were working closely with the private sector to protect against attacks.

It's about someone making money in the private sector and because

>I won't go into the details

there is neither credibility nor any actual information. It's a person with private/personal interestes making statements without backing them up.
That is how the INT sector operates here in Germany and since we've been copying (poorly) what US INT has been doing since the realy 80s, I'd say the lesson applies to AUS INT just as well.

>Is there any possible exaplanation, that this comment is factually correct?

I have no clue about the power grids outside of europe; keep that in mind please for the following...

Our power grid has fail safes on several layers, the best know is the multiplicity of connections: No single plant is connected to fewer than two other plants via the grid and no node in the grid can be cut off by severing less than three lines.
So any attack that would have an effect on even a single customer has to shut down more than two power plants and cut multiple physical power lines.

I find it hard to imagine any sort of attack that accomplishes that while at the same time being preventable "just in time".

>Do power companies have some sort of intrusion detection system? Are they scanning incoming and outcoming IPs? Did they realise that there is an open connection to a Chinese IP through the MSSQL port? Did they shut down their internet connection to investigate?

>Power plants should not be connected to the internet. Ever. At all. We don't do that in Europe, the US isn't doing that afair and I sure hope Australia isn't doing that.

Critical infrastructure such as the power grid has separate communication networks... at least that's what I learned at uni and I honestly hope it's true.

>Joshua Anthony Frydenberg

If this was about a german politician I would now try to find out which family members of this guy are chairmen of which companies in the military-industrial sector. Outside of Germany this might be more subtle, maybe just stakeholders rather than chairmen.
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No. 63418 Kontra
>>63417
Addendum, check out this talk: https://media.ccc.de/v/32c3-7323-wie_man_einen_blackout_verursacht

(It's got english translation)

Here's the youtube link to the english translation in case the original link doesn't work for anyone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjingj2473Y
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No. 63442
>>63415
Tbh, I say we need bigass electrified rail going everywhere and reduce the reliance on trucks at all, but I was mostly talking about fuel because it's the thing we have little to no theoretical capacity to produce from oil to petrol locally. It makes it even stranger that we would jeopardise our supply by giving it a really fragile model. At least with fertiliser and such we have the hypothetical capacity if we really did need it in a pinch, ya know?

>get ya own bloody rods
ebin

>>63417
He is balls deep in the real estate lobby but who isn't down here. Sounds like a shitty stereotype but he is unironically one of our Israel guys as well :-DDD
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No. 63453
>>63442
>>63442
>At least with fertiliser and such we have the hypothetical capacity if we really did need it in a pinch, ya know?

Capacities that will take over a year to be up and running. Fertiliser plants are huge undertakings. Even harder to re-build once we ran out of AdBlue.

For some reason, this Ernst gets really mad about this fucking AdBlue thing. What is this shitery when countries cant even self-sustainable with the most basic of products?
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No. 63458
>>63417
I can tell you personally that Australian intelligence are semi backward whores of 10 Downing Street who wish they were whores of Washington DC instead. Their primary activities include making various lobbies money and attemptingpoorly to stage false flag attacks to further Britain's faggy agenda principally around information surveillance and control. Our only saving grace is their gross incompetence.
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No. 63459
>>63453
As I said, hypothetically you can dig yourself out of that situation. I don't doubt that it's grim and would be a shitty year, but the fact it's a hole you can hypothetically dig yourself out of except for the whole
>Australia
>Secondary industries
thing, does lessen the blow somewhat while something that sets in within a month with no way out besides the resumption of normal just in time supply lines is fuggen terrifying to me. Maybe I'm just small brain on that though because petrol is already dear as fug, and I need it for work since I work predawn and late night when Brisbane public transport isn't active :-DDD