/int/ – No shittings during wörktime
„There is no place like home“

Currently at Radio Ernstiwan:


Hail Odin! by Christenklatscher666

M3U - XSPF


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No. 70907 Systemkontra
587 kB, 2432 × 1867
>>
No. 70908
Ernst, I need a tool that cuts and merges pdfs, I don't trust the online instruments, maybe they inject malware into my pdf? Do you know of any good tool?
>>
No. 70909
6 kB, 900 × 500
I can one-up that fridge breaker guy: First, I went down some stairs, slipped, and fell on my knee. Then, after a drive to the supermarket some glass bottles (empty, mostly) fell out of my trunk and broke. In the supermarket my finger got between a freezer door and the freezer.

>>70908
What do you think prevents THAT from injecting malware? Get a better tinfoil hat.

To close on a high(ish) note: If you buy something in certain German supermarkets, the cashiers will ask you if you want revenge. It's a customer loyalty scheme called "payback". Seriously. See picture.
>>
No. 70911
8 kB, 245 × 279
>>70909
>the cashiers will ask you if you want revenge
But they only ask "Payback-Karte???". Also, you should watch less Mel Gibson films if revenge is the first thing you think of when hearing "payback".
>>
No. 70913
>>70911
If you think of the scheme first, you have the ability I'm missing to shut off the brain regarding other languages.
>>
No. 70914
>>70904
Ordnungsämtler are scum anyway. I have never met a single one who wasn't a douche.
I once was moving stuff into a new apartment and parked on one of those smalltown gravel parking lots near the apartment, you know, where they put up the booths and rides for faires and such, the ones that don't have any actual fences, but just some logs that denominate their borders.
Anyhow, I was just a few minutes away and this dude was already giving me a fine. I was only in my early 20s then and tried to explain to him that I am living there and just moving stuff in and out. I even begged him not to fine me.
Then he told me "yeah I also live here, if you park over there, I won't be able to fine you.". Then he continued to write me up, probably with the biggest internal trollface imaginable.
The best thing about them is that they actually don't have any power, like cops would.
>>
No. 70915
>>70913
Well, when I am in Germany talking to germans I obviously switch to german throughout. When talking to someone in english, I don't think of cellphones when hearing the word "handy". And when speaking french and someone is talking about the Meuse, I think of the river first.
>>
No. 70916
>>70908
Maybe libreoffice would work? It can import pdfs.
There's also pdftk command line tool, but it's old.
There's this.
https://github.com/pdfarranger/pdfarranger

Also, make sure to then export the file to a document format that isn't pdf.
PDF is harmful to the environment!
>>
No. 70918
>>70916
Are you mixing up PDF and NFT?
>>
No. 70920
>>70909
>What do you think prevents THAT from injecting malware?

Because I think it is more likely that some Ernst knows humble developer(s) for clever pdf tools whose energy is fueled by hate of proprietary software aka Adobe devil and thus trustworthy in the freedom of information way.

>>70916
LibreOffice seems to be capable of what I'm looking for, Thanks. It is also part of every university computer, at least I've seen it several times.
>>
No. 70922
>>70916
Good suggestion for most users. Just FYI regarding cli tools: imagemagick (using the tool 'convert') can extract and convert any range of pages from multiple PDFs and export them to whatever format. I use that to get PNGs with transparent background and high DPI count from (single pages of) PDFs every now and then.

Naturally I have to look-up the syntax every time :-DDD
>>
No. 70924
>>70918
The heat produced by laptops all over the world when they launch Adobe Reader probably rivals the average crypto farm.

>>70920
I didn't know anything about free pdf tools as of 16:00 UTF, and I literally just googled "FOSS PDF manipulation tools".
I used to complain about people not googling, but these days, search engine results are so fucking bad, that you have to already be a domain expert to filter out all the fake, AI generated, SEO optimized results.
"Professional internet searcher" should be a job at this point.

>>70922
Hm, does it export to native PDF as well, or just images?
I don't think converting the pages to images is all that big a problem, the average user with the snipping tool can do that in a pinch.

It's manipulating the PDF files that sucks.
The person who decided to invent closed source text documents should be punched in the balls repeatedly and incessantly until the time of their natural death.
>>
No. 70926
>>70924
It can convert to PDF as well as from PDF. And do pretty much any operation imaginable since its scriptable.
>>
No. 70927
>>70926
By "convert" do you mean it embeds an image as a PDF page, or does it actually parse the document structure and and preserve text and vector graphics and layout, etc?
Because those are a bit different.

It'd be like saying that a screenshot of a .doc file page inside an <img></img> tag is a "conversion" to .html
>>
No. 70930
>>70910
Yes, "kylähullu" is a village idiot, though it would seem that it directly translates to village crazy, and is usually used for real crazies than fools. I don't think that's really related to "kyylä".

>>70912
>In short, Finns are assburgers who drive very fast on unpaved roads with a co-driver calling the shots
True, true.

>>70909
Seems to be some sort of a global curse doing the rounds. Stay strong.

>>70922
>Naturally I have to look-up the syntax every time :-DDD
Can relate. I wish CLI tools came with default cheat-sheets for the most common use cases. I appreciate your work Mr. Opensourceman, but I only ever need these 5 functions. Please don't make me read the docs! RTFM shouldn't apply to everything in life.
>>
No. 70931
>>70924
>I didn't know anything about free pdf tools as of 16:00 UTF, and I literally just googled "FOSS PDF manipulation tools".
>I used to complain about people not googling, but these days, search engine results are so fucking bad

No, because this is true! I probably know more about computers and how to operate the internet than the average normie, but I'm far away from having a deeper knowledge of software and computers. But would have googled free pdf converter and look what seems promising according to my criteria, but I think I could count on Ernst better bc yeah, search engines are shit. When I google books I first get thousand places where I can buy them (amazon usually always first), the publisher info page ranks 5th or even 10th or whatever. It's shit.
>>
No. 70932
>>70761
And today snowdrifts again.
>>
No. 70936
I read a few stories from Joyce Dubliners, either I'm not used to that storytelling or it's just really good and holds up as a classic not by accident. Life comes from the small but precise details and how they are packaged in words. I enjoy how the characters get humbled in a way you can only feel sympathy for because one has been humbled often enough in order to relate. Their dreams and words crash with reality and Joyce never resolves this dissonance but leaves you alone with it just like oneself is always alone with piles of experiences that just don't want to sit right, regardless of what you do.
>>
No. 70940
>>70936
Joyce is really good at capturing the subtleties of human emotions, especially kids'. The most humbling part of the dubliners is to learn that joyce wrote all the stories in his early 20s.
>>
No. 70944
Speaking of (amateur) rallye: Austria has quite a bunch of them, I've watched several onboards from rallies of the last years and the tracks are also great, curvy hill landscapes even narrow passages between houses.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=um5PFrITjZ4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0GULgc-ToEM
>>
No. 70946
>>70908
>>70924
>I didn't know anything about free pdf tools as of 16:00 UTF
In that case, the inquiring German may be glad to learn I can confirm that pdfarranger works. It comes with Trisquel GNU/Linux.
pdfarranger froze my system for minutes every time I used it, but I think that was not so much pdfarranger's fault but the fact that the PDF file I used it on consisted of many pages of very detailed vector cartography, plus probably my shitty system.
>>
No. 70947
>>70801
I wasn't talking about "Host" or "Meeting". Don't you notice anything odd about the rest of the sentence? In my earlier post, I wrote it incorrectly from memory; the actual message is "Warten auf den Host um dieses Meeting zu starten". (If you're not familiar with Zoom: The message is supposed to tell you that Zoom is waiting for the host to start the meeting.)
Answer: "Um zu" is wrong here. Back-translated to English, the German message says something like "wait (or waiting, or to wait) for the host in order to start the meeting" instead of a dass construction such as "darauf warten, dass…". Also, the word order is English (depending on the verb form, more idiomatic German might not start with the verb), and the verb form "warten" to indicate status is unhelpful because it can be misunderstood as a command. To let the user understand what's going on, a more helpful message might be something like: "Der Host hat das Meeting noch nicht eröffnet. Bitte warten Sie."
>It was some nonsensical replacement of a perfectly fine german word with an english term.
"Ein Phone wie du", perchance?

>>70816
Ich lachte.

>>70842
I notice other poor language there, but what's wrong with "zu deiner Erinnerung"?

>>70877
That's useful knowledge. Thank you.
t. Blockwart

>>70896
Is that Astana Nur-Sultan? I bet that tower provides a breathtaking view over … the vast nothingness empty wastes beautiful steppe.

>>70940
Expat? English major?
>>
No. 70949
>>70947
>Don't you notice anything odd about the rest of the sentence?
Oh you meant that. I was still focusing on the language mishmash.
Although I find your "good" german example rather sprawlingly constructed. A simple "Warte auf Host..." in the sense of "I, the client, am waiting for the host" would probably suffice, since you can't join the meeting without the host anyway and the short rapport/telegram form is fine for such applications.
And no, I don't think it was "Ein Phone wie du", is that even a real thing?
>>
No. 70950
29 kB, 345 × 404
I can feel the sunshine on my skin.

What a strange, nearly forgotten sensation.
>>
No. 70951
>>70950
When I arose this morning, the sun was shining a little bit, with its rays breaching through the branches of the trees.
Then the clouds came and how it has been overcast almost all day.
Forecast says rain and/or snow from tomorrow on. And I will have to go on a business trip through half of Germany on thursday ;_;
>>
No. 70952 Kontra
>Stay up until two AM to finish reading The Importance of Being Earnest
>Sleep five hours
>Lecturer postpones it because we're behind on talking about the previously made translations

Anyway, I did the modern Chinese midterms, can't wait for the shitty results. It was easier than expected 2bh. I actually managed to fill the 150 hanzi quota for the essay part, though I made endless repetitions in some parts, but I used the new grammar.

What's more important is that I had lunch today. With a girl. One on one. She asked if I wanted to go to this vegan place with her so I did because why not.
We study together often and talk regularly and I think she might like me. And I like her.
Rose coloured campus life inbound.

Also I ordered a volume of manga and whenever I order weeb shit my mother randomly (as if by divine intervention) decided to open the fucking package at her workplace and I feel endless shame.
At least she knows I'm spending that stipend well.

I'm at the library right now. I'm doing nothing but I have a laptop on hand so I've decided to write this ebin blogpost.

>>70800
My issue lies less with sounding foreign than with constantly sounding like as if I was mimicking this late 1800s style of composition.
Which by itself is eloquent but I feel like it's oftentimes too tiresome for people to read, especially when I'm writing letters.
In essence, I'm way too formal and too "old-style".
But hey, at least people no longer say my style is "textbook". Honestly, that hurt a lot in HS.
>>
No. 70953
>>70952
>But hey, at least people no longer say my style is "textbook". Honestly, that hurt a lot in HS.
What does that encompass? And why did it hurt?

Also, that comment reminded me of a film I've seen over ten years ago - Pane e Tulipani, it's about a housewive who literally gets "forgotten" during her vacation trip and on her way home meets a handsome stranger (played by Bruno Ganz, better known as the mustache guy yelling for Fegelein). It's pretty much a chick flick for middle-aged women, don't ask why I watched this.
However, the actual point was that Bruno Ganz in this film speaks very old-fashioned italian and iirc it's because he learned italian through reading Dante.
>>
No. 70954 Kontra
>>70953
*housewife
There are certainly more mistakes, but that's the one I just noticed.
>>
No. 70955
>>70953
It basically meant that it was overly dry and tiresome to read, while also being "not me".
As in, it felt like I wasn't using my "own" style when writing an essay but rather mimicking something, which hurt because I wasn't mimicking anything, it's just how I write.
>>
No. 70956
I once was invited to judge paintings at an art gallery when I was around 14 and award a “youth prize”.

I spent hours carefully looking at each paintings, comparing them and discussing them with some adults present. I really took this seriously to make my choice meaningful.

When the award ceremony came, a real prize was given by educated art critics and then I got to personally hand my prize. I remember the look in the painter’s eyes, he looked spiteful and embarrassed. I had just humiliated him in front of all his peers.

>>70954
>There are certainly more mistakes, but that's the one I just noticed.
Feel’s known too well.
>>
No. 70958
69 kB, 702 × 546
I had to cycle to work today beause my wife took my car and it nearly fucking killed me

It's gonna take me like 48 hours to recover from this
>>
No. 70959
5,0 MB, 480 × 360, 1:00
>>70955
Wait, so your writing style is not having a style? Are you Data?

>>70956
>When the award ceremony came, a real prize was given by educated art critics and then I got to personally hand my prize. I remember the look in the painter’s eyes, he looked spiteful and embarrassed. I had just humiliated him in front of all his peers.
I don't quite understand, did you choose the same winner as the jury or was it another one and why would it be humiliating?

>>70958
Man I wish I could cycle at all, but my epididymitis won't let me.
>>
No. 70962
>>70951
The first rays of the Sun are so beautiful. Are you driving for the business trip or why worry? In any case I wish good weather for your trip.
>>
No. 70964 Kontra
>>70959
It's not that it had no style, rather that it wasn't a "personal style". The claim was that my essays read like as if I had copied them straight from a book instead of me writing it.
>>
No. 70965
>>70962
>Are you driving for the business trip or why worry?
I have to drive an hour, meet some people, then drive another two hours, and the same in the evening. The highways that will be passed are some of the most frequented in Germany, which means a good chance of accidents even on good days. Now couple that with bad weather where people suddenly forget how to drive and you have really bad traffic jams. And thanks.
>>
No. 70966 Kontra
>>70959
> I don't quite understand, did you choose the same winner as the jury or was it another one and why would it be humiliating?
It was a price separated from the real jury and I chose someone else. I think he didn’t consider me appreciating his painting as a compliment. It could be something else but he really wasn’t happy I gave this to him.
>>
No. 70968
128 kB, 1200 × 800
>>70966
Maybe a normie amateur prized his painting instead of the professional critics made him angry. His painting is "only" respected by normies, not the art world to speak in exaggeration.
>>
No. 70970
>>70966
"Father was right, your art is shit and only children like it."

>>70959
It's giving out a coveted award and then doing another competition but this time we pick the would-be winner of the competition if the judges had the minds of 14 year olds.

Ultimately this could have worked if they did the kid's award ceremony first.
>>
No. 70971
>>70966
Sounds like a pompous ass if true. But then again, I wouldn't be surprised if that kind of person is exactly the kind that would enter such a competition in the first place.
>>
No. 70978
>>70966
I would be more happy to accept award chosen by 14 years old or by anyone but professional critic. They rate art itself. Meanwhile professionals have their eyesight obstructed by reasoning on how things should be and judge according to their preconceptions.

t. can't draw
>>
No. 70985 Kontra
>>70978
I think 14yo olds have their own norm system by which they judge art and what art should be considered art, that's probably not the difference you are looking for when making that argument.
>>
No. 70987 Kontra
>>70978
What make you think common people don’t have preconceptions about what a painting should be that influence their judgment?
>>70971
> such a competition
It was "realism" style landscapes and the contestants were nearly only >35 yo mens.
>>
No. 70989 Kontra
>>70985
Fugg… You were quicker and more precise.
>>
No. 71008
>>70987
>It was "realism" style landscapes and the contestants were nearly only >35 yo mens.
Well, that only strengthens my point :--DDD
>>
No. 71040
this week was quite eventful, in many ways (mostly bad),

my family dog passed away suddenly and unexpectedly one week ago. I think I am okay now, but it still hurts to see other happy dogs on the street. She was old, and had recent health issues, but the cause wasn't directly related to these. I feel regret I hadn't visited her for a few weeks, as my family were all in covid quarantine. The house feels empty without her.

I bought tickets to NZ in April too - just as their border opens. I have to figure out who I'm staying with, but it seems like my mormor will survive covid (after a very close call) - so will get to see her hopefully. It's still touch and go - but looking much better. Very paranoid about catching it myself, as the border guards are extreme and they will cancel my ticket if positive on rapid test. It feels no one in Australia wears masks now, right as we have a large uptick in cases.

I'm hoping to make an IWO at Auckland museum - it's one of the really good ones. Much better than anything in my city in Aus. Only museum that I saw that felt close (in my limited experiences), was the Glyptotek one in Copenhagen. Europe has so much more culture than here, it feels. Such cases, being on the arse end of the world.

I kind of wanted to take the train between cities there too - but their rail system seems horrible. Seriously shithouse. Between the cities of Auckland (1.65m population) and Hamilton (165k population) (165km apart), there are only two trains per day, and it's a 3.5 hour trip. It's right on the corridor that should be doing all north - south train transit for the north island. I really don't want to take a bus, if I can help it.

Today someone rear-ended my work car too. Thankfully, not at all my fault, and not my personal car - so works dramas mostly :DD still, will need to spend time reporting the reports to everyone about it.
>>
No. 71041
>>71040
You Brisbane IIRC? It's just Brisbane. Here in Smellbourne everybody wears one. No mandate at the moment, just people do it.
>>
No. 71043
26 kB, 292 × 271
>>71041
Yep, in Brisbane. Even the pensioners are without them now. I reckon our cases must be under-reported. It's 10k/daily, and during the last peak when everyone wore them/things were closed, it got to 20k/daily. Maybe the concern is just more drilled into Victorians, due to the long lockdowns?

I understand that eventually everyone will get it, but I wish they didn't collectively decide to do so, just before I need to pass NZ border security.
>>
No. 71044
>>71043
>Maybe the concern is just more drilled into Victorians, due to the long lockdowns?
That's my thought. Also, Brisbane often seems like a sky news caricature, so people going feral the moment they don't have to be hygienic shouldn't surprise anybody. The amount of sanitiser I had to replace at doors was directly proportionate to the level of covid restrictions. Like last year, the moment mask mandates went away, sanitiser usage went down tenfold.

t. lived in Brisbane until 1.5 weeks ago
>>
No. 71045
Summer is here.
The feeling of direct sunlight on my skin is probably the most irritating thing in the world.
Also, I can't see my computer screen well because it's not bright enough any more.

I think I'm finally done with alcohol.
The cognitive decline after a night of drinking has become very noticeable and can no longer be tolerated.
The hangover doesn't hurt, but it turns me into some kind of zombie with no higher brain functions, I can actively observe the inability to form complex thoughts, as well as impaired memory access.
It's like being mentally retarded while being aware that you are, worst feeling ever.
As opposed to being mentally retarded while NOT being aware of it, which is great. But it looks like I did enough damage to my brain where that's no longer achievable lol.
>>
No. 71046
>>71040
> Europe has so much more culture than here, it feels.
"Culture" is a lot of stuff you don't notice around you because you're used to doing things a certain way. Said way is totally strange to foreigners.

Just think about what you subconsciously do every single day and you'll be surprised how complex it is.
>>
No. 71056
This war has one clear benefit: everyone in Russia has stopped to make a fuss about COVID-19. Well, except a bunch of die-hard anti-vaccer morons, who have now discovered "the truth about AIDS which is going to hit all the vaccinated people in several months".
>>
No. 71059 Kontra
674 kB, 891 × 755
Well, I guess today was kind of ass.
It rained and I had to close the door like three times because I first forgot my mouse at home, then I forgot my hat and then I simply forgot to turn off the lights. Bad omen.

I bought a cocoa roll, but paid 70HUF less because they made a misinput but I didn't complain.

Translation history lecture was meh. Guy who was supposed to hold a presentation bailed out and said he didn't prepare.
I arrived early so I actually talked with the guy for a bit.
After class he insisted we talk a bit more and even paid for my coffee in exchange for what basically was a two hour long lecture on Chinese thought and history.

Was 15 minutes late for my last class of the day. Kinda felt good to listen to this Chinese history lecture because afterwards the lecturer validated quite a bit of what I just told this clueless outsider student of English.

On my way home my bag got stuck on someone's coat and a zipper broke off. Fucking brainlet pensioners can't graps the concept of standing on the right of the escalator when going anywhere to let people in a hurry go up faster.
I'll most likely get a new bag. I've been using this one for like 4 years now and it's pretty rugged by now. Problem is that I'm pretty used to the style so it'll be hard to find a new one that fits my needs and tastes.
>>
No. 71061 Kontra
>>71056
Same. In a sense, Putin did liberate the Wect. Just not from the Nazis, but from Covid.
>>
No. 71077
75 kB, 750 × 831
I read the introduction to Foucault's The Archaeology of Knowledge since I plan to read an important work on historiography and this seems undeniably very important, even more so as I ask myself what Foucault does there. About 6 years into the "game" I can say this introduction was fun because I get to understand what seems more mysterious and a buzzword bingo to undergraduates, I myself was taught this in my BA but only now is the movement of Foucault's thought more clear to me (and because I been tutoring on Foucault last semester among others). Especially the formal aspect is interesting and commonly not discussed in BA. I mean the notion of operations that is at work and the question why does Foucault speak of (formal) operations himself. Why can he say that? Which is basically playing Foucault on Foucault, nothing unusual at the height of self-refenciality.

It is about historiography but he sees himself then in a field in
>which the questions of human being, consciousness, origin and subject manifest, intersect and specify.

The historical apriori was borned I think(?)
>>
No. 71078
noam chomsky is the richard dawkins of humanities
>>
No. 71079
>>71046
I am mindful of that - I think when I say culture, I was more so leaning on the physical/historical manifestations of it. That said though - the (white) Australian culture the way you speak it, tends to be a knock off of British in many ways, with a few aspects of European origin mixed in. Add things like tall-poppy syndrome, drinking, importance of sport, building a national backstory around sacrificing a generation in WW1, etc - and you tend to get it. It's not my thing so much, and often one feels kind of on the outside looking in.

The city I live in was mostly built in the last ~70 years, with most of it being suburban sprawl. There is barely anything of note (here at least), from pre-1900 - and then I saw toilets in Europe that predated Europeans even laying eyes on this continent. It's hard to describe, but it was a very nice feel to see such old things from the past.

>>71044
What made you pull the trigger on the move? (I missed in previous threads if you said).

I thought about maybe moving to Adelaide, or even Melbourne, if the cost of life up here keeps going up. I know Melbourne is worse - but if it gets just a bad here as there, then why not. Taking the tram everywhere seems comfy too.

So glad I wasn't born in Sydney though.
>>
No. 71080
>>71079
I flat with my sister, she got a better job down this way, and I'm a cleaner for whom leaving a job ain't much. I was fine to tag along when the weather isn't hot and humid all the fucking time, and I don't have to flat with randos again.

Melbourne has ups and downs. Petrol is fucking cheap here. I haven't seen it go above $2/l since I got here. Rent is higher but that's because my sister picked a suburb that's on a tram line so she can get to her office in the city. Said suburb is 'nice' and therefore kind of expensive. Honestly you can live pretty far out of Melbourne compared to Brisbane as long as you don't need to go to the CBD because it's way more decentralised than Bribsane is.
>>
No. 71082
>>71079
> The city I live in was mostly built in the last ~70 years, with most of it being suburban sprawl. There is barely anything of note (here at least), from pre-1900 - and then I saw toilets in Europe that predated Europeans even laying eyes on this continent. It's hard to describe, but it was a very nice feel to see such old things from the past.
Two things come to mind
1) "In the US, 100 years is a long time, but in Europe, 100 miles is a long way" (couldn't find who said it) - you can swap USA for Straya. And in both cases nobody cares about the original inhabitants and their history
2) The city near my town was bombed to shit in WW2, there's not much old stuff left
>>
No. 71098
>>71082
>The city near my town was bombed to shit in WW2, there's not much old stuff left
It's not just the houses themselves though, because if it's not under Denkmalschutz, you're eventually reaching a Theseus's ship kind of situation.
What I doubt though is that despite the bombed down place they also changed the road layout and general parcel layout, so the organically grown structure of centuries is still the same. New paint of coat for the same old thing, so to say.
And obviously any kind of immaterial property is way older than anything in white australia.
>>
No. 71101
61 kB, 1300 × 1065
Friendly reminder to believe even less of the bullshit on this here internet today.
>>
No. 71102
>>71101
The third snow of the year decided to fall today.
Fooled by the elements.
>>
No. 71103 Kontra
>>71101
There are burials on this Friday and I cannot resists the thought of dead people rising up and saying "April April"
>>
No. 71104
>>71103
That would be pretty funny, I have to admit.
>>
No. 71106
For some reason I am farting horribly, despite already having taken a shit this morning.
And I didn't even eat any weird stuff.
>>
No. 71120
I found two condoms in my bathroom which expire on 30th of April this year. Is this a higher sign?
>>
No. 71121
>>71120
Depends.
Have they been stored properly and not exposed to high temperature deltas and such?
Is it realistic to be able to use them until that date?
>>
No. 71122
461 kB, 450 × 281, 0:02
>>71120
It tells you to make water ballons and drop them on your neighbours.
>>
No. 71123
34 kB, 231 × 296
>>71120
It signifies an prolonged state of being unused :DDDD
>>
No. 71124
>>71121
Nice Ernstchan touch.

>>71122
Makes sense.

>>71123
Yes

Because my relationship just ended and she used hormonal contraception :DDD

t. Keine
>>
No. 71125
Made myself some Cole Slaw, quite tasty, what do Americans use it as side for? I know KFC sells Cole Slaw, but I'm not going to buy chicken.
>>
No. 71126
Sick with the birus gorona. Expected worse, mostly just fever and a headache.

>>71125
I had coleslaw with BBQ ribs in a Texas style restaurant. It was a good pairing.
>>
No. 71127
>>71125
Typically goes with chicken (fried of BBQ), also burgers and hot dogs. A standard side for cookouts, interchangeable with potato salad. Went to a diner yesterday and ordered a Texas burger (topped with BBQ sauce and onion rings). It was supposed to come with coleslaw, but they forgot it. Bastards.
>>
No. 71128
>>71127
And you didn't want to speak to the manager?
>>
No. 71129 Kontra
32 kB, 320 × 480
Yesterday night I translated a poem of Wang Anshi into Hungarian. It's a simple four-line poem about the New Year.
I'm not a very good poet, but I think this one turned out okay.

Got a letter from one of my lecturers. It's an invitation to her habilitation presentation. She's asking me to be present and be part of the student committee.
Don't know if it's ethical to call someone to be on a committee you're on good terms with, but I accepted either way.
This feels like bureaucrats in some Chinese novel forming an informal alliance in matters of career. Should be more like jury duty.
Who knows. Maybe people just think I'm "Honest" and "impartial" and "trustworthy". Or it could simply be that nobody really gives a fuck and they think I just take my studies seriously enough to partake in academia like this.

Fuck, I need to start assembling the deck for the Classical Chinese exam. It's going to be rough.
Wonder how big the deck will be. Last semester it was +1k.
But hey, at least I don't have to translate INTO classical. That'd be funny.
"Task 1: Composition. Write a short text in which you try to convince the emperor that the local flooding wasn't your fault, and you don't need to be banished with your family to Gansu! 20/ points"

Had chicken nuggets for lunch.
>>
No. 71132
I read up on recent chinese history and their geopolitical goals, and realized that our reisdent hungarian is being trained to be a glowie for orban's regime, as part of his chinese integration strategy.

It all makes sense now.
>>
No. 71133 Kontra
3,4 MB, 498 × 378, 0:02
>>71132
The külföldiek know, shut it down!
>>
No. 71137
>>71133
Just you wait, soon you will be invited to some (((cultural exchange programs))), and then offered a position as a (((diplomat))) in a hungarian delegation to china, and before you know it you're at a round table with Xi discussing strategies for economic and cultural de-integration with europe.

That's how these things start, you know.
>>
No. 71139
453 kB, 640 × 480
>>71137
Hungary knew exactly that the new silk road would provide lucrative job offers in the future. He could also become part of a think tank, less humanistic studies in addition calibrating him to the reality of economics and political science and he's good to go to give advice on how to relate to China. Just like 100 years ago: what's going on in the mind of the yellow people?
>>
No. 71142
>>71137
A friend of mine studied sinology and now works as some kind of secretary/representative laowei for some big shot chinese company.
He's fluent in hanyu and last I heard had a chinese gf.
>>
No. 71143
>>71142
Isn't it funny how deterministic humans are, at large?
>>
No. 71145 Kontra
>>71143
Don't know how deterministic you wanna have it but if you study a field it is quite likely you end up doing something that is related to it.
>>
No. 71146
Why do germans randomly kontra their posts? Is there a scientific explanation for this?
>>
No. 71147
>>71146
It's not random.

t. a different German
>>
No. 71148
>>71145
and if you don't study that subject, it's quite unlikely you end up doing something related to it.

see? very deterministic.
>>
No. 71149 Kontra
>>71146
It's a way to stay humble by not bumping the thread with every single post you make.
t.German-adjacent mitteleuropoid
>>
No. 71150
>>71149
but a thread that's alread on top of the front page by definition can not be bumped, making kontra obsolete.
>>
No. 71152 Kontra
>>71150
False. Someone else might submit a post into a different thread a nanosecond before your one line shitpost and now you’ve taken away their spotlight. Very rude.
>>
No. 71154 Kontra
>>71146
It means it's not intended to be a "serious" post, I think.

>>71137
That's like Tokayev's early life section.
>>
No. 71155
>>71146
Post not relevant/long enough or not serious. As the other German said, it is not random but it's not a rigid system either.
>>
No. 71159
>>71154
> That's like Tokayev's early life section.
Hungaryball, don't forget about fellow Ernsts as a chairman of Hungarian People's Republic. A modest villa near Hévíz would be nice. And also new hardware for EC so that old threads are not erased.
>>
No. 71187
102 kB, 251 × 251
>>71155
>Post not relevant/long enough or not serious.
I only kontra my serious posts, but have my shitposts in the prime spot.
>>
No. 71201 Kontra
>>71187
I sometimes kontra my serious posting as well. I think kontra is also a bout tired soul or something, mysterious teutonism.
>>
No. 71203
>>71201
Säge is actually pretty easy to understand:
You simply don't bump the thread. If you're not some fourchanneling or k*hltard it's done out of cordiality because you don't want to hog the spotlight with your not necessarily important-enough post, thus you Kontra.
In fact, /b/ had this problem for some time when people were almost universally contra'ing their post out of politeness, but that's the other extreme.
>>
No. 71204
>>71203
>You simply don't bump the thread.

I know, I'd still use it as an indicator for something else. A sign can take on another function, it is not monofunctional determined in that case. But according to the post ITT it is not widely understood ;)
>>
No. 71206
>>71204
Well, I already mentioned those cases where it's not just a non-bump. I also remember times when people thought sage worked like a downvote (which, for faster boards, is functionally true).
I think the biggest problem is that, as on Krautchan, the Säge/Kontra appears in bright red letters, which makes it look aggressive. I think seeing a Kontra next to the post in e.g. Blue would already have a widely different effect on the reader.
>>
No. 71210
63 kB, 768 × 522
I hate incense burning. It smells nauseating.
Every culture who places any importance in these shitsticks should not be seen as equals. Hippies who love incense should be deported to an asian country of their choice with all due haste.
>>
No. 71215 Kontra
10 kB, 217 × 320
>>71210
>People burn incense in public space, especially indoor areas to drive away coronavirus
And I can't stand it for a second that anyone near me lights up a cigarette. Everyday I wish Mao could crawl out of his coffin, start cultural revolution 2.0, and send, among others, all superstitious boomers into labor camp.
>>
No. 71216
>>71215
My condolences Ernst. Even if worked, I'd prefer having coronavirus.
>>
No. 71219
>>71215
Boomers smoke because of superstitions?
>>
No. 71220
77 kB, 640 × 426
Read The Small Rain by Thomas Pynchon, great atmosphere. Another short of him about spies before WW1 didn't catch me and I stopped. But I'm now interested in reading is famous novels.

A bit of depression is creeping in again, I procrastinate the last steps of the student paper, I could have been through by now. Maybe later I will write the introduction and conclusion, it's not that much that is missing.
>>
No. 71222 Kontra
>>71219
Boomers burn incenses and I'm sensitive to even very small amount of smoke. I suffer.

>>70947
>Expat? English major?
As you can see, I'm not good enough at engrish to be either
>>
No. 71229 Kontra
1,9 MB, 498 × 280, 0:02
Today I did basically nothing besides randomly reading a few pages from books and lunch. I decided to not inject myself with caffeine today and I promptly fell asleep during the afternoon.

Oh, actually I cleaned up some of the dust and threw out a lot of trash so my room doesn't look like I'm a developing Hikkikomori or the like.

Tomorrow's election day. Oh joy.
This is going to be hard.
Libtards are expecting a strong Orbán victory again. All that's sure: By the day after tomorrow, there'll be a lot of rage, one way or another.
The opposition is already trying to create a narrative that Orbán cheated with the mail in ballots from Romania and Slovakia.
Current estimates are 49% for Orbán, 44% for the united opposition.
Putin probably saved Orbi's ass with the war.

I guess I'm chronically boring.

>>71210
Personally I don't have much of an issue with the smell, but the smoke part is really annoying and makes me cough.
Sometimes I can smell it seeping through the wall from my sister's room.

>>71139
>>71137
I mean, yes, I was aware of the "Eastern Opening" policy and the "warming" of PRC-Hungary relations before embarking on the degree. It's a good bonus that I might or might not be able to get some benefits out of.
>>
No. 71230
>>71229
> I decided to not inject myself with caffeine today and I promptly fell asleep during the afternoon.

A thirty minute nap does more than any coffee could do is what read. Coffe is above that anxiety inducing, not the best case for a stressed academic. But I coffee tastes good, so I cannot resist all day every day.
>>
No. 71231 Kontra
530 kB, 847 × 735
>>71230
My 30 minute naps keep turning into 3 hour ones.
Though I sometimes do take naps at university in the Far-Eastern Institute's Library.
First time I did it I expected to get thrown out but I was actually asked if I had slept well.
>>
No. 71233
147 kB, 400 × 400
>>71231
You didn't snore loud enough for them to care
>>
No. 71234 Kontra
217 kB, 480 × 721
>>71233
Jokes on you, I was the only person in the entire library besides the librarian.
>>
No. 71237
>>71234
And you still don't know how loud you are. Unless you recorded yourself sleeping.
>>
No. 71240
104 kB, 453 × 512
>>71231
My boy, whats an alarm?
>>
No. 71242
324 kB, 1295 × 1600
Do people outside of the German speaking parts of the world know this guy?

If you don't, you can read about him (and others) here. It's in English.
https://www.gutenberg.org/files/12116/12116-h/12116-h.htm
>>
No. 71244
>>71242
Didn’t check the link but the picture is of course Jörö-Jukka. It has been read to me when I very young. Can’t really remember the story. Something about teaching you to take care of your personal hygiene. Or not.
>>
No. 71246
>>71244
> Jörö-Jukka
Is that name something that can be translated?
>>
No. 71248 Kontra
>>71246
Jörö can be used to describe someone who doesn’t enjoy other’s company, sort of closed-off and sulking type of deal. Jukka is just an ordinary man’s name.
>>
No. 71249 Kontra
Are we meme-kontraing now?
>>
No. 71250 Kontra
>>71249
No, I felt incredibly embarrassed for not translating jörö straight away in the same post. Especially when I recently complained about people posting stuff in whatever languages.

I’m so sorry you had to see this.
>>
No. 71251
>>71250
I asked out of interest, not to point out your behaviour.
>>
No. 71252 Kontra
142 kB, 994 × 558
>>71249
Only Germans are allowed to kontra outside the non-bump paradigm.
>>
No. 71253 Kontra
>>71250
jörö jukka :--DDD
>>
No. 71254 Kontra
224 kB, 683 × 1024
>>
No. 71255
>>71254
Fun fact: A couple of years ago near my old flat I saw a street cleaner who looked exactly like Spede Pasanen.
>>
No. 71256 Kontra
>>71255
You should’ve asked to take a picture! It would’ve delighted the world at large to see Spede’s doppelgänger. If such person existed in Finland he’d be photographed to death already.
>>
No. 71257
>>71256
>"What? Spede who? Go away and let me wörk in peace!"
Nah, I don't talk to random strangers if I can avoid it, and I didn't have a camera anyway.
>>
No. 71258
147 kB, 818 × 1091
The feeling that brings all forms of mental ruin and destruction is this feeling of wanting to skip a period of your life. I've been in it for the past month and only now do I realize it. Thankfully it's not too late :DD time to switch course before my brain implodes :DD
>>
No. 71261
>>71257
>What? Spede who?
Why must you break my heart so?

>>71258
May your new course bring you peace and joy.
>>
No. 71264
>>71261
> Why must you break my heart so?
Some random street cleaner in Germany has no idea who that is. Hell, I only know of him because imageboards. Also, in case that wasn't clear, he didn't say it.
>>
No. 71271
50 kB, 620 × 409
>>
No. 71273
I went out and voted, both in the General Election and the Referendum we held today.
No idea who will win. Current turnout is at ~63 percent and there's still an hour to go.
>>
No. 71276
Today I tried to listen to some music, but the music's lyrics reminded me about unpleasant things in my life, and soured my mood for the rest of the day. People in the park gave me double takes because I was walking around with clenched fists, gritted teeth, and a constipated expression on my face, with earbuds plugged into my ears.

This is why I prefer instrumentals.
>>
No. 71283
90 kB, 500 × 553
>>71276
this you?
>>
No. 71295
82 kB, 1076 × 760
633 kB, 960 × 958
>>71283
No, this is me
>>
No. 71296
An interesting quote on the birth of modernity, the modern way of thinking, living, judging and treating. Modernity is constituted by naming (differentiating) those that are not-modern that do not separate. (I still like the Heinz von Foerster remark on science coming etyhmologically from skei that means cut/seperate).

>In his several books that engage with the modern divide between nature and culture, Bruno Latour describes the historical scenarios that can serve as a backdrop scenography to our understanding of the role of animism in the constitution of modernity. The bifurcation of nature and culture, and the subsequent purification of each domain (by way of objectification), Latour asserts, make moderns “see double.” Every modern must take sides, and perceive the world either from the side of the object (where everything is fact), or of the subject (were everything is “made,” constructed), either from nature with its determinate, indisputable, and eternal laws (to which science provides access), or from the society of social agents who can construct their world freely (in politics and culture); but each perspective sees the two domains of nature and culture as absolutely separate, from mutually exclusive points of view that one can not occupy at the same time without falling “back” into animism and an archaic past. The modern idea of animism just appear then as a necessary result springing from the separation between nature and culture, as a category that allowed the moderns to name those who did not make the same distinction, those who assigned social roles to non-human things, and as a category that made them imagine the collapse of the boundaries they had installed.
>>
No. 71319
84 kB, 299 × 288
>>71295
But you're not 19 anymore, what is this charlatanry?
>>
No. 71357 Kontra
409 kB, 668 × 469
>>71296
A further thesis: westoids conceived of themselves as rational subjects, everything else (the orient for example) became the object, something that was not the west and its values. Westoids never conceived of themselves as objects to study until the 20th century and a critic of the enlightenment thinking that was among other things done by frenchies. That is why westoids get pressed sometimes when people say their way of thinking and living is problematic, they never learned to take an outside view of themselves in the hundreds of years before :DDD
>>
No. 71360 Kontra
>>71296
>science coming etyhmologically from skei that means cut/seperate).
If I recall correctly skei also means shit. Nothing further to add.
>>
No. 71362
I just got groceries for about 30 moneys and most of it was sweets (they had Ritter Sport on sale).
I decided to dwell in this degeneracy for as long as it's still possible, gaining some reserves for worse (and colder) times in the process.

I also think it's now fair to call myself an alcoholic because I realized that for the last weeks I have had at least one beer each evening. I blame home office.
>>
No. 71364 Kontra
>>71360
Can't find a proof but in celtic language it was also used in vomiting and both make sense tbh, because there is a process of separation in order.
>>
No. 71365
65 kB, 768 × 432
>>71296
[From the same article] Art in modernity however is an institution in modernity that is granted to be animistic, it is the place for animism in modernity, art is the place where one can let go, but only controlled, god beware art would rule the world! No, no, art is confined and controlled, like the rave club, where one can take drugs and return to the dread of modernity the next day and for most days. In art you can fictionalize, stroll far of from truth(tm) and hold tight to any fetish as you like, as long as the fetish is controlled. And one, we don't have any fetishes ourselves anymore, we are enlightened!

>There is a magic circle being drawn around the institution of art that renders it exceptional while inscribing it into the logic of separation. Objects of art always magically confirm their status as art. It can thus be explained how Sigmund Freud arrived at the conclusion that in art, modernity preserved a place for animism, for in art, we have retained an animistic relation to pictures and objects alike. The regression to “earlier states” (historically and subjectively) and the conflation of differences between fiction and reality, the self and the world; all this becomes possible as long as it is institutionally framed and cannot make claims to objective reality, in which case it would likely be rendered pathological, but at least cease to be “art” in the modern sense of the word—the form of art that, according to Adorno, was made possible by the secularization of the Enlightenment. What would elsewhere appear as outright regression can serve cultural advancement within these institutional confines, under the condition that it is bracketed off from everything else.
>>
No. 71368
>>71365
I am always wondering what these people get out of deconstructing anything. They don't want to accept the present, but are also not willing to create the future.
It always reminds me of my 12th/13th grade english teacher who always wanted to dissect everything, thus inevitably sucking out any kind of residual endearment, fun or intellectual joy one could even just attempt to draw from works like A Streetcar named Desire and Moon Palace (hint: they all SUCKED).
>>
No. 71369 Kontra
>>71368
They want to understand how it works
>>
No. 71370 Kontra
>>71368
Also, you change the future by deconstructing things as weird as it might sound, deconstruction left/leaves its mark. I'm not fond of the idea that is everything that can and needs to be done, but it can have its effect.
>>
No. 71371 Kontra
>>71368
And since aller guten Dinge sind drei: Analysis is fun.
>>
No. 71373 Kontra
>>71371
Wait, since when are you into maths?
>>
No. 71374
>>71368
That's called "critical theory".
>>
No. 71376 Kontra
>>71373
:^)
>>
No. 71378 Kontra
88 kB, 711 × 641
>>71368
How to deconstruct deconstructism:
https://web.pdx.edu/~singlem/coursesite/ddfos.html

>>71357
Every civilization ever holds a self centered world picture. Accusing westoids of eurocentrism is typical eurocentrism. :D
>>
No. 71385 Kontra
419 kB, 1024 × 589
>>71378
>How to deconstruct deconstructism:

The text seems to propose in a fashion that it is accusing others of doing so. There is not even one reference to prove something what is said besides some name dropping.
Anyway, I think many thesis of this texts don't met an actual argument. I think the isolation thesis is interesting though. Other than that, the idea is not really understood. The lense is culture and the system and formal operations differentiate from that of engineering and physics or chemistry. Could it be that this is due to the objects of scrutiny? A thought that seems to cross not many minds. Freud is more used for the takes on culture than on empirical psychology, but that is just one thing this text us uninformed about.
I don't want to steer too much, the other German and I already found out that there are barriers in language and thinking things. The difference between humanities and "hard" science is that the latter don't really want to understand the humanities, they just want to revile their bogusness because it does not adhere to the scientific method and its formal systematic. There is no honesty just the chance to make fun of something you did not really understand and that in the interest of your own field (speaking of interests) needs to be defeated. It's taken as a power play...Foucault would be useful to make an actually analysis from that POV ;)
Scientists have a hard time to comprehend that they themselves get the object of scrutiny from a cultural or sociological perspective. Not long ago I found out that the 20ths century humanities actually got there by way or formalizing culture (getting it closer to mathematics in a sense, there is a history of that and people try to write it), it is indeed abstract and the scrutinity of culture came to the conclusion that it itself would be the object of culture since they are part of culture. Hence self referentiality was introduced and that alone goes over the top of some peoples heads. The hard sciences are separated from their objects like particles and other sorts of material configurations.
>>
No. 71386 Kontra
>>71385
One particular claim is interesting

>Convert your chosen distinction into a "hierarchical opposition" by asserting that the text claims or presumes a particular primacy, superiority, privilege or importance to one side or the other of the distinction. Since it's pretty much arbitrary, you don't have to give a justification for this assertion unless you feel like it. Programmers and computer scientists may find the concept of a hierarchy consisting of only two elements to be a bit odd, but this appears to be an established tradition in literary criticism

Usually the claim is backed by an argument. The distinction savagery/civilization and its hierarchy is used in colonial discourse and had partial consequences. These fellas over there are children we have to teach them our way (whoopsies we made them slaves and killed many of them but our way is good, we need to decide over their fate on various levels of living)

>Programmers and computer scientists may find the concept of a hierarchy consisting of only two elements to be a bit odd

Then explain yourself? The attitude is insufferable, they want to disguise other but get on intellectual high horses themselves aka "I don't need to explain my expert knowledge"

Postmodernism is among other things a critical view on the enlightenment period, modernity and its cultural and societal consequences. But people from other fields just get very defensive about it, another possibility for asking why that is.
>>
No. 71387 Kontra
>>71378
Eurocentrism would be part of what is called ethnocentrism.
>>
No. 71388
>>71385
Well, the author right away states that he approaches this whole thing with the mindset of an outsider (and it's obviously a little bit tongue-in-cheek), so I don't get why you're getting so defensive with an air of butthurt here.
In fact I wonder why you aren't happy to get another outsider perspective of someone more eloquent and structured than some random imageboard goon who posts from work inbetween doing his actual job.
Also,
> There is not even one reference to prove something what is said besides some name dropping.
made me laugh a bit, because that describes almost every single humanities text I have read here (including your posts) :--DDDDD

> The difference between humanities and "hard" science is that the latter don't really want to understand the humanities, they just want to revile their bogusness because it does not adhere to the scientific method and its formal systematic. There is no honesty just the chance to make fun of something you did not really understand and that in the interest of your own field (speaking of interests) needs to be defeated.
Sounds like cope and projection.
And coming from the other side it could be argued that humanities also don't want to understand the "hard sciences", and instead act like they generally understand more of everything and then try to tell others that the way they are doing things is wrong because [insert arbitrary deconstructive theory].

Let me come up with a new comparison to illustrate the different goals:
Humanities are turned inwards, they are self-reflective and because they encompass all that is "cultural" in any kind of way, they also have this claim to encompass "hard sciences" too.
The "hard sciences" however are turned outwards, understanding themselves as tools to describe, not reflect. They don't restructure, but add.
So we have two diametrically opposed directions here (or let's say divergent developments) that could possibly only meet at the very center, or origin, if you will. It would certainly be herculanean task to bring them together, but it would be a historic achievement.

>The hard sciences are separated from their objects like particles and other sorts of material configurations.
Well, that's one of the core principles, although the observer effect is well-known, so a strict separation will most certainly never be possible, but you can at least try.
The humanities analogue would be, with regards to what was said above, to just shut up and listen for once.
>>
No. 71389 Kontra
>>71388
Addendum: I haven't read the whole thing yet, just the first few sentences.
>>
No. 71390
>>71378
>Accusing westoids of eurocentrism is typical eurocentrism. :D
At last I truly see. I think Germans made up the idea of eurocentrism. They're always interested in attaching normal things to national traits.

What did the German tell the German who was eating bread?
Stop acting so German!
>>
No. 71391
>>71319
I am young at heart.
Also known as "manchild".
>>
No. 71392
>>71391
Hmmm, now I wonder - is there a functional difference between manchild and sonbasket?
>>
No. 71394
>>71388
>because that describes almost every single humanities text I have read here (including your posts)

Show me the texts, because I can show you an abundance that has references (everything that is published in the last 30 years that I read had references, even before that). Also, I could give you a reference to every actual quote I make (and did so in the past in the media thread).

>Sounds like cope and projection.

So you don't want people defeated that question your olympic position? Noble.

>that humanities also don't want to understand the "hard sciences"

What makes you think that, could you quote something? I could give you plenty of texts that try to understand what sciences are doing. The operation of science from a cultural perspective, which does not mean that they don't see sciences have their own, internalist perspective on what they are doing and that is not cultural in the end. But this distinction is grasped as a matter of culture to be explored. To be fair many things can be called cultural, but yeah, it is cultural and I think many people don't understand that. Basically, hard sciences fight a humanities straw man because the actual humanities is outside of the epistemological arena of the hard sciences because at one point it was clear that the perspective and thus epistemology is different. And while the humanities could live with a relational perspective of both disciplines the hard sciences and their method furiously defend their monopoly on truth on everything, or so it seems because otherwise, they wouldn't be so butthurt about the humanities.
I'm a humanities student and maybe even scholar in the future and I try to understand the sciences and the humanities and I'm interested in their entangled and divided history. I'm the living proof that you are wrong. But I had to develop to a point where it was clear that I need to understand the sciences as well, albeit and due to today's expertise I will never be a mathematician or chemical engineer. But nonetheless I try to understand the internal operation and methods and its consequences on other levels, ofc in the end I'm more interested in the cultural aspect, because I'm interested in how culture works and since I've been doing this for years already I'll have a hard time getting equally knowledgable in physics or biology. But from that standpoint I'm not interested in shit shows that the sciences wars have been and it seems like people from the hard sciences cannot find another mode of engagement except for making a shitshow, there is no honesty or serious interest, contrary to my experience in the humanities and the fields I'm interested in where it is not uncommon to get knowledge in the field that you put under your cultural lense.
>>
No. 71395 Kontra
And it makes me wonder, everything that is quoted is some things around the time of the science wars or the grief study shit. Why only engage with these example, have you never looked any further? That doesn't indicated what I would call serious interest. Weren't we not also talking about shitty science papers, I'm not talking about obvious hoax here but countless of papers that have a shitty methodology, a lame argument and what not? They happen both in the hard sciences and the humanities, but does that speak truth about countless of other papers that are published? Probably not.
>>
No. 71396
>>71368
It's the equivalent of accusing your natural science teacher to suck out any joy or fun for the wonders of nature by presenting you with the dissection of nature into atoms/particles and their workings.
>>
No. 71397
>>71394
>Show me the texts
Man the threads are still there, but I don't have the time to dig into them right now, but you know very well what I am talking about. Playing dumb doesn't suit you.

>So you don't want people defeated that question your olympic position?
See, this is the butthurt I am talking about. This "hard science" strawman who looks down on and scoffs about everyone who is not a galaxybrain hard science dude like him.
And again, conversely I can play the ball back that the perspective and epistemiology are different. An outsider perspective, like one of those 19th century anthropologist entering some jungle tribe with the mindset of a white burden explorer, studying those so-called savages.

And your posts are the best example of that, that persistent subtle butthurt about "hard sciences", and no, you are no proof, at all, because you still don't try to understand those "hard sciences".
Or maybe you did try and weren't able to and therefore get butthurt, but from all you writings it's obvious you are separating yourself from the "hard sciences".
So you are a humanities student and you don't have any hope of ever getting deep into any of those STEM subjects, and why is that?
Obviously you're not dumb, so it must be a lack of actual interest.

You are only interested in mathematics, physics, chemistry and biology insofar as to get another edge on those arrogant scientists (and since you're so keen on sources, I am still waiting for a concrete example of that scientist arrogance).
You don't even need to be equally knowledgeable in any of those fields, but the one thing you obviously still haven't done is even just stepping in. You feel like "hard sciences" don't talk to you on equal footing and that's only because you jumped into a trench and now yell up. I'd welcome you as a brother if I weren't under the impression you wouldn't.
>>
No. 71398
>>71396
What a shitty and utterly wrong comparison.
>>
No. 71401
Today I called a psychiatrist. I wanted to do it for the last year but never managed.
>>
No. 71405
>>71397
We should stop the butthurt roulette, obviously, the discussion is always heated.

>but you know very well what I am talking about.

I don't, show me humanities texts that don't cite. Or do you mean that one example of the fluids? One example doesn't stand in for countless of papers released in the years after 1990.

>it must be a lack of actual interest.

No, it is time.

>conversely I can play the ball back that the perspective and epistemiology are different

Indeed, that is what I'm talking about but what to make of it? That is a question I see only being of interested in the humanities while hard science don't even seem to entertain the thought there could be another perspective to acquire knowledge about something other than their own. Science doesn't allow for something else and that is one part of cultural inquiry.

>insofar as to get another edge on those arrogant scientists

No, I'm interested in the unraveling of the relations of reality not in beating up people intellectually. In the end, I want to look from two perspectives simultaneously in the hope of getting a better view. You can use your eyes to see your body, but a mirroring surface and its perspective will provide to help you see and grasp differently about yourself.

>I am still waiting for a concrete example of that scientist arrogance

The text China posted is one example. I referred to the science wars, so obviously Sokal and Bricmont Imposter book. They accuse people of being interested in sounding intellectual and securing their position, being imposters, and not in finding out something about so called reality. But in the end, humanities are interested exactly this as well, cultural and social reality and how do material reality and cultural reality relate, how comes it all together, the big question and yes on both sides people might tackle this riddle, I know about myself I'm interested in finding an answer and I'm not alone.

>>71398
Why?

It seems to be formally the same

X is dissecting/dividing up/breaking up which is what analyzing something means Y to understand its workings better. A mechanical undertaking one could add.

In the process any enjoyment one had is sucked away, basically a disenchantment, no? The (poetical) magic, the aesthetical experience is sucked off in both cases. But is it? I think both cases make for another argument, to appreciate both in a different manner and to not lose its magic in the end, since nothing is fully cleared up. I have some experience in music production and I can enjoy music while being able to analyze it to certain degrees. It's not a necessary contradiction.
>>
No. 71424
>>71405
>We should stop the butthurt roulette, obviously
Not before you haven't told us why you have such a massive chip on your shoulder, because you obviously do.
I just want to know what happened, maybe that helps me understand you and your perspective better.

>No, it is time.
Come on, it's not. If it really were time, you also wouldn't be posting here.

>while hard science don't even seem to entertain the thought there could be another perspective to acquire knowledge about something other than their own
I think I have asked this before, but how would that help me in conducting my research?
The scientific method is, as the name says, a method, a tool, and for its applications, it's the best method we know so far. What would that other perspective entail to improve that tool?
As a "hard" scientist you simply don't have that luxury of going full meta. Sure, you have people improving the tools of the tool (e.g. better microscopes etc.), but they have enough to do.
It's simply a cost-benefit calculation and apart from high cost there is no obvious benefit.

>You can use your eyes to see your body, but a mirroring surface and its perspective will provide to help you see and grasp differently about yourself.
I like that picture and I need to ponder it for a bit.
Initially though I feel like that dichotomy you describe is more of an imitator situation, because the other perspective does come from my own image, but from the impression someone else has of me.

>I referred to the science wars, so obviously Sokal and Bricmont Imposter book.
Yes, out of nowhere. But Sokal to Grievance showed that the underlying issue has never been addressed.
In "hard science" you can easily idenfity shoddy methods and questionable conclusions and those people aren't published by reputable journals in the first place.
If someone is actually faking, i.e. manipulating results, with the study having a sound premise, proper methods and plausible conclusions, how are you gonna find out as reviewer/reader?
We still assume all scientists have at least an ounce of honor and won't present faked results, but if they find out, they are rightfully shunned and ruined.

Now what stuff like Grievance shows is that even "proper" journals will accept anything as long as it "sounds" right.
And that leads to the question how much of the review process is just simple opinion and politics and if it's even comparable to "hard science" because these kind of articles don't have any reproducible results, but are merely opinions.
And having an opinion and presenting that as a result is just something that "hard" scientists can't deal with, because it completely contradicts the scientific method.
You can have an opinion on how your results can be interpreted, but the number of possible opinions are finite and usually rather narrow and you can come up with a theory - which is an attempt of explaining why those results came out the way they came out - but nobody would ever just jump to the conclusion without any results (and if they did they would be laughed at).
What happens in "hard science" when you built upon an opinion presented as a result (and thus fact) you can see when you look at homeopathy.

>It seems to be formally the same
Yes, but it's not functionally the same. The comparison is quite literally books with flowers, nature (not man-made) with culture (entirely man-made).
Understanding what molecules are responsible for the smell of forest just opens up another layer of natural wonders, whereas determining what kind of meter this or that poem uses doesn't, it's just some nice-to-know trivia, at best.
Spending two (2) hours on discussing the possible meanings of the protagonist's surname (true story btw) makes me just hate that book in question more, because it's an entirely subjective matter as long as the author doesn't step forward and tells us.
And speaking of music, sure, understanding how demanding a specific solo is or in what clever way that composer used a specific theme does not detract from my enjoyment (although I have a friend who is so deep into music production now that he mostly judges music on its production values anymore), but having to determine the key if I don't try to play a piece, or determine the orchestration or if the "character" is more "centripetal" or "centrifugal" completely misses the point of any kind of art, which is, first and foremost, to evoke a feel (of whatever kind).
And if all you can, or are forced to, do anymore is strictly viewing a piece of art through the technical lens, you don't feel anything anymore and then it's not art anymore.
I would probably have to kill myself if I noticed that music doesn't give me feels anymore.
>>
No. 71427
>>71424
>Not before you haven't told us why

What I meant is that accusation of being butthurt in both directions is a useless enterprise at this point.

>to improve that tool?

It's not about improving a tool that works in specific ways, it is about the relation of these realities found by different methods and people not accepting that there are other methods to acquire knowledge about something that is not conceptualized as (dead) matter.

>Come on, it's not. If it really were time, you also wouldn't be posting here.

I have 2-5h of reading and writing atm and one hour to start into a topic seriously is not the way to go when you will only come back a few days later. I started with an introduction to mathematics by Alfred Whitehead two weeks ago, two chapters but then the book needed to be left alone for a week and now I know I will have to go over the two chapters again anyway.

>reputable journals

Don't know if they are reputable journals

>having an opinion and presenting that as a result is just something that "hard" scientists can't deal with

I'm a bit puzzled why you think hard scientists are arrogant when you tell me that humanities just just opinions.

Any article is based on a system of concepts of culture one example and it is an abstract statement is the conceptualizations of culture as performative that is culture is a way of doing things for instance and methodological tools to access an object, both is deployed to argue for something. An opinion is not an argument. And while these arguments might be small in their point making, so what? I don't think that most papers in the sciences are revolutionary papers, many will be small numbers in their citation count as well and just written for an in-group. And while humanities have no labs, it doesn't mean it is not empirical.
Ofc there are bad papers in their reasoning.

>nature (not man-made) with culture (entirely man-made).

the distinction you made is what is of interests to cultural studies as in distinctions first constitute culture.

>Understanding what molecules are responsible for the smell of forest just opens up another layer of natural wonders, whereas determining what kind of meter this or that poem uses doesn't, it's just some nice-to-know trivia, at best.

>what molecules are responsible for the smell of forest just opens up another layer of natural wonders

What does this even mean?

>whereas determining what kind of meter this or that poem uses doesn't

I think determine the meter is not the only thing that is done, it is a task done in seconds. You could equally argue that the meter would be one part that opens to other layers of the poems magic.
It shows that you have not a good idea of how literary analysis is done on an academic level (here in Germany), you come with school which is frankly spoken quite far away from what is done in uni. It a sort of basic hermeneutic in school, but that is only one thing you can use to analysis a piece of corpus of literature.

>because it's an entirely subjective matter as long as the author doesn't step forward and tells us.

Again, the author is not taken to be fully conscious of what his/her actions and above all an author is situated in culture. Nobody debates the name for 2h in a seminar, Ive studied literature as minor and we talked about many different points but nothing a single line was the talking point for 90min, you are either exaggerating or make an extra polation that won't hold statistically if tested ;)

>strictly viewing a piece of art through the technical lens, you don't feel anything anymore and then it's not art anymore

You view nature through a technical lense, who does it not subtract any magic out of nature, why is nature not about feeling, have you never been moved by a mountain view? the beach? the weather? the sky? Don't you kill all that asthetical feeling nature gives you by reducing it to atoms and their movement?

Art is technical, if you like it or not, art requires techniques whether it is sculpting, painting, writing. A different brush stroke can make for different effects. You think art is where some genius acts as medium for divine feeling? Ok but that can be just called a concept of art from the romantic period.

You can dissect a work of art by looking at how it was crafted/made/constructed/built to grasp the full potential and meaning of that work of art and thus enjoy it more than by some vague feeling. And it doesn't kill any feelings. Yeah, art functions in a way that is why you feel something, just as a plant functions in a way that is why you smell something and both are embedded in a larger complex that opens up more layers.
>>
No. 71428
Here, have the paper introduction and conclusion that I wrote on Thomas Bernhards Kalkwerk. Working through this book analytical made me enjoy it even more because I found an answer to what this book does and I know then why it touches me so well. I can go to the section when Konrad talks about how he can hear things coming from the bottom of the "lake" and smile while I think that this section is an allusion to philosophical pondering about truth and what not.
I don't think that resembles school literary analysis much at all.

Einleitung:
Der Erzähler in Das Kalkwerk präsentiert dem Leser Aussagen einiger Figuren über Aussagen, die der eigenbrötlerische Para-Akademiker Konrad gemacht haben soll. Die damit einhergehende Vermittlung von Gesagtem ist verbunden mit meiner ersten These: Über die Erzählweise (discours) des Kalkwerks zeigt sich, dass sich für den Mord an Konrads Frau, sowie für das Scheitern Konrads an seiner Studie keine tatsächlich zutreffenden Gründe oder Erklärungen angeben lassen. Der Leser kann sich der zahlreich vorgebrachten Begründungen als Bedingungen nicht sicher sein. Daraus folgt meine zweite These: Der Erzähler vollzieht in seiner Darstellung die philosophische Position des Perspektivismus, demzufolge eine Wahrheit nicht benannt werden kann, stattdessen muss man sich mit Annäherungen, Standpunkten und Interpretationen zufriedengeben. Während die Ebene des discours rein perspektivistisch verfährt, wird auf der Ebene der histoire die Diskrepanz zwischen dem Willen nach absoluter Erkenntnis und deren praktischer Unmöglichkeit verhandelt, welche sich in Konrads Studie und deren letztendlichem Scheitern und damit zugleich auch Konrads Scheitern manifestiert.
Die Erzählung lässt sich als Studie über Konrad begreifen. Damit setzt sich der discours von der histoire ab, indem er den Perspektivismus vollzieht und so zu einer artikulierten Studie kommt, was Konrad mit seinen klassischen rationalistisch-idealistischen Ansprüchen(1) verwehrt bleiben muss, die er aber praktisch sowieso nie umsetzen konnte, da, wie sich zeigt, er selbst in seinen eigenen Aussagen ‚Opfer‘ des Perspektivismus wird. Der Roman ist durch seine Darstellung eine Demonstration des Perspektivismus, welcher im Scheitern Konrads seine scheinbare Überlegenheit offenbart. Es kann keine weitreichenderen Erkenntnisse geben als jene, die der Perspektivismus in Verbindung mit Sprachskepsis anbietet. Die menschliche Existenz ist durch epistemische bzw. alethische Unsicherheit gekennzeichnet. Den Perspektivismus akzeptieren, bedeutet Gewissheit und damit Sicherheit auszuschließen.

Schluss:
Es sollte gezeigt werden, dass der Erzähler als Vermittler von Aussagen über Aussagen fungiert. Daraus ergibt sich ein Zweifel am Wahrheitsgehalt der vom Erzähler gesammelten Aussagen. Über die Gründe, die tatsächlich zum Mord geführt haben sollen, welche Motive Konrad dafür womöglich gehabt hätte und warum er an seiner Studie gescheitert ist, wird an zahlreichen Stellen im Roman spekuliert, entweder durch Konrads Nachbarn oder durch Konrad selbst (und durch den Leser). Was aber tatsächlich als Erklärung zutrifft, bleibt offen und muss offen bleiben, da es keine autoritative Deutungsinstanz gibt, welche sich z.B. im Erzähler hätte verwirklichen lassen können. Was übrig bleibt von der Wahrheit sind Spekulationen oder Annäherungen.
In der Form der Darstellung vollzieht sich die philosophische Position des Perspektivismus, welche Gewissheit negiert. Konrad stellt an seine Studie Absolutheitsansprüche, er will durch sie einen totalen Zusammenhang zum Ausdruck bringen, scheitert jedoch bei diesem Versuch, auch, weil er in Kontrast zu seinen Ansprüchen selbst perspektivistisch denkt und lebt. Der Erzähler wiederum fertigt eine Studie über Konrad an, kann im Gegensatz zu Konrad aber seine Studie artikulieren, da er statt absoluter Ansprüche im Einklang mit einer perspektivistischen Epistemologie arbeitet. Der Roman als Studie über Konrad demonstriert die Unmöglichkeit von Gewissheit und ist gleichzeitig ein Ritterschlag für den Perspektivismus, was durch die erfolgreiche Darstellung des Erzählers auf der einen und Konrads Scheitern auf der anderen Seite verbildlicht wird.

And you know what, Thomas Bernhard loved Nietzsche and Wittgenstein, so not too far away is the claim that Bernhard was fond of Sprachskepsis and perspectivism.

The literature I used for that paper:
  • Bernhard, Thomas: Das Kalkwerk. Roman. 1. Auflage [Nachdruck]. Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp 1987 (=suhrkamp taschenbuch 128).
  • Chatman, Seymour: Story and Discourse. Narrative Structure in Fiction and Film. 1. Auflage. London [u.a.]: Cornell University Press 1978.
  • Eyckeler, Franz: Reflexionspoesie. Sprachskepsis, Rhetorik und Poetik in der Prosa Thomas Bernhards. 1. Auflage. Berlin: Erich Schmidt Verlag 1995 (=Philologische Studien und Quel-len 133),
  • Jahraus, Oliver: Das ‚monomanische‘ Werk. Eine strukturale Werkanalyse des OEuvres von Thomas Bernhard. 1. Auflage. Frankfurt am Main [u.a.]: Verlag Peter Lang 1992 (= Münche-ner Studien zur literarischen Kultur in Deutschland 16)
  • Liebrand, Claudia: Chandos, Bacon und Urbantschitsch. Hörensagen und Autopsie in Thomas Bernhards Kalkwerk. In: Gegenwartsliteratur (Ein germanistisches Jahrbuch) 13 (2014), S. 43-65
  • Lindenmayr, Heinrich: Totalität und Beschränkung. Eine Untersuchung zu Thomas Bernhards Roman "Das Kalkwerk". 1. Auflage. Königstein/Ts.: Verlagsgruppe Athenäum [u.a.] 1982 (=Hochschulschriften - Literaturwissenschaft 50)
  • Stephen Nathanson: The Ideal of Rationality. 1. Auflage. Atlantic Highlands: Humanities Press International 1985, hier S. 1-14.
  • Neumeyer, Harald: „Experimentalsätze“ und „Lebensversicherungen“. Thomas Bernhards Kalkwerk und die Methode Urbantschitsch. In: Franziska Schößler / Ingeborg Villinger (Hrsg.): Politik und Medien bei Thomas Bernhard. 1. Auflage. Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann 2002. S. 40-29
  • O'Neill, Patrick: Endgame Variations. Narrative and Noise in Thomas Bernhard's Das Kalk-werk. In: Friedrich Gaede (Hrsg.): Hinter dem schwarzen Vorhang. Die Katastrophe und die epische Tradition - Festschrift für Anthony W. Riley. 1. Auflage. Tübingen/Basel: Francke Verlag 1994, S. 231-242.
  • Podszun, Johannes: Untersuchungen zum Prosawerk Thomas Bernhards - die Studie und der Geistesmensch. Entwicklungstendenzen in der literarischen Verarbeitung eines Grundmotivs. 1. Auflage. Frankfurt am Main [u.a]: Verlag Peter Lang 1998 (= Gießener Arbeiten zur neue-ren deutschen Literatur und Literaturwissenschaft 20)
  • Weber, Dietrich: Theorie der analytischen Erzählung. 1. Auflage. München: Beck 1975
>>
No. 71429 Kontra
>>71428
I like this point I made just before the conclusion.

Die Ironie des Romans: Der erzählende Versicherungsvertreter versichert über die dem Perspektivismus inhärente Un-sicherheit. Gewissheit kann es nicht geben. Wenn der Wunsch nach Sicherheit existiert (Kon-rad), bedeutet dies nichts anderes als die Existenz von Unsicherheit (‚Realität‘ des Perspekti-vismus). Der Versicherungsvertreter versichert als Repräsentant (Vertreter!) des Perspektivis-mus den Leser über die Unsicherheit und Unmöglichkeit von absoluter Gewissheit. Sein Ge-schäft ist die Unsicherheit, durch sie existiert er.
>>
No. 71430 Kontra
28 kB, 526 × 584
Today was rough. Didn't sleep, wrote an F in Latin.
Modern Chinese was a C.

We finally talked about that translation we had to did of T.S. Elliot's Cats. Apparently the lecturer liked my version, but only because its style was so bad I was intentionally making a parody of the work.

I said that I was to hold a presentation to high schoolers at the college's workshop, but that's off. Simply nobody registered for the Oriental Studies Workshop's presentations.
Numbers were already quite limited for most workshops, but ours failed to attract even a single student who signed up for the event as a whole.
It's half "students weren't interested to begin with" and another half "retards put the OSW programme at the bottom of the pamphlet for the second day, and for the first day they wrote we have no programmes at this time."

At least my copy of the Three Hundred Tang Poems anthology arrived.
>>
No. 71432
23 kB, 1081 × 566
603 kB, 1920 × 1920
Did you guys know there is another EC? They sell concrete, and concrete accessories.
>>
No. 71434 Kontra
>>71432
And Ernst Cafe is in Budapest. Think I posted a pic of it couple of years back.
>>
No. 71436 Kontra
129 kB, 750 × 1000
>>71434
Nice. Seems there is also one in New Orleans, serves cajon food.
>>
No. 71441
>>71432
Imagining how they talk made me chuckle

>Yeah, we here at ÖRRRNST concrete take concrete very seriously
>>
No. 71444 Kontra
19 kB, 440 × 384
>tfw your post started a war

>It's taken as a power play...Foucault would be useful to make an actually analysis from that POV ;)
Honestly you are right here. I feel a bit ashamed now. I remember during a harmonic analysis class I took the professor joked about how at the end of ww2 when the japanese run out of manpower they sent only students in humanities and social sciences to the front but kept stem students safe. I felt immensely disgusted and the professor very ugly.
>>
No. 71445
>>71427
>What I meant is that accusation of being butthurt in both directions is a useless enterprise at this point.
Okay, I still want you to answer my question.

>it is about the relation of these realities found by different methods and people not accepting that there are other methods to acquire knowledge about something that is not conceptualized as (dead) matter.
Again, why should that be of interest for a "hard" scientist? Say, I do accept whatever you have in mind, what then? Sell your idea to me.

>I started with an introduction to mathematics by Alfred Whitehead two weeks ago, two chapters but then the book needed to be left alone for a week and now I know I will have to go over the two chapters again anyway.
Start with something easier, then.
A simple Kosmos book about plants or insects you place on the loo.
Everytime you take a shit you skim a bit. Or get a periodic table.
Learning how it is constructed takes only a few minutes and then opens up a lot of other stuff.
While in each discipline it is indeed advisable to work you way up from the ground, you don't necessarily need to master mathematics first to then graduate to physics to chemistry and so on.

>I'm a bit puzzled why you think hard scientists are arrogant when you tell me that humanities just just opinions.
You misunderstood me here. I was referring specifically to that stuff Grievance was about, not to the humanities in general.

> I don't think that most papers in the sciences are revolutionary papers, many will be small numbers in their citation count as well and just written for an in-group.
Is that not self-evident? Imagine every single paper was a breakthrough paper.
I can't find it right now, but there was a PhD comic with "your research" making an extremely small dent in the subject that mande an extremely small dent in the field that made an extremely small dent in the "overall" knowledge. I don't understand though what it has to do with the point at hand.

>What does this even mean?
Without going into more detail, why do I even like the smell of forest? Why are the bacteria producing that smell growing like fungi? Why are they producing that smell in the first place, just for me to enjoy? And if not, why do I enjoy it? Are there more organisms that do a similar thing? And we are still only scratching the surface.

>You could equally argue that the meter would be one part that opens to other layers of the poems magic.
How so?

>Nobody debates the name for 2h in a seminar, Ive studied literature as minor and we talked about many different points but nothing a single line was the talking point for 90min, you are either exaggerating or make an extra polation that won't hold statistically if tested ;)
Okay, it was only two school hours, but we really did talk about the protag's name for a whole Doppelstunde. And this was just the most egregious example. We robbed through that book at a snail's pace because teach was constantly doing that and stopping at the smallest and most irrelevant details. Intentional overthinking, so to say. Even you would have hated that.

>You view nature through a technical lense
Did you misunderstand again or did you not read my paragraph? Apart from this being merely an assumption, I wrote
>And if all you can, or are forced to, do anymore is strictly viewing a piece of art through the technical lens, you don't feel anything anymore and then it's not art anymore.
The emphasis here is on the first part.
And I personally have no problem separating.
I can track and explain my erection from the photons of boobs reaching the receptors in my eyes down to how boobs come to be in the first place, but I won't ponder that and instead just enjoy the boobs.

>Yeah, art functions in a way that is why you feel something, just as a plant functions in a way that is why you smell something and both are embedded in a larger complex that opens up more layers.
Not all plants smell, though. And while you are being polemic with your genius divine feeling, I stand by my conviction that any piece of "art" that doesn't evoke a feeling is not art.
It might be some design or product that might even have put a lot of thought and craftsmanship into it, but if it doesn't do anything beyond that, it's not art to me, period.

You have to tell a bit more about the Kalkwerk though. I haven't read it and from your post I don't see what's so special about this unreliable narrator compared to all the other unreliable narrators.

And I find that whole perspectivism thing highly ironic, because you are analyzing that book already under the firm premise of it being perspectivism and then concluding that it IS perspectivism, which kinda directly contradicts perspectivism, doesn't it? It reminds me of all those medieval exitence of god proofs where nobody ever considered the possibility of god NOT existing, so all those proofs were just geared towards cementing the obvious.
And just being aware of the author being aware of it and seemingly building your premise from there seems a bit weak, because it's just an assumption.
So my thesis is that talking about perspectivism is a useless undertaking because each new perspectivist analysis is victim to its own perspectivism and so on.
>>
No. 71446 Kontra
>>71444
>tfw your post started a war
Nah, the other german and me have a history, it's all good.
>>
No. 71448
>>71445
>Again, why should that be of interest for a "hard" scientist? Say, I do accept whatever you have in mind, what then? Sell your idea to me.

So hard scientists are not interested in how material, cultural and social reality relate? The other alternative seems to be that everybody does their little discipline thing like it has always been done and we have what we have now and we have those stupid trench wars.
Or will they reduce it to matter in a sort of physicalism?

>How so?

How does form and content relate to other pieces of art, to cultural phenomena social phenomena and material phenomena. that might or might not cross centuries. Why and How can be asked to a poem and a book or a whole corpus. Obviously a poem is gone through faster than a novel.

>The emphasis here is on the first part.

So you mean your evil teacher forced you to view it trough a technical lens? I think that is bs, since you say you can separate between photons and boobs, you can also separate the technicality of the work of art and its Gestalt (like: whole). Or were are people forced by mind control to just view it technically? As far as I know people can decide for themselves how they will view a thing, they could very well all alternate between at least two views.

> I stand by my conviction that any piece of "art" that doesn't evoke a feeling is not art.

Ok, but so far that is just a personal opinion. So nothing one would like to see in a paper.

>what's so special about this unreliable narrator compared to all the other unreliable narrators

Not all unreliable narrators are the same, and not all stories with an unreliable narrator are the same. That said, it is also not only about the unreliable narrator. The narrator is one thing to consider in my course of argument though.

>because you are analyzing that book already under the firm premise of it being perspectivism and then concluding that it IS perspectivism

?

I made a premise and then I argued for it in the main body that is left out ofc and in the conclusion, I merely restate the results in (maybe too) short manner. You didn't get an abstract.

How should I proceed otherwise? I think of a premise and "test" it in the way that I find arguments from inside the text that supports that thesis.

As far as I know a scientific experiment starts with a premise and the conclusion then would be that the premise is true or not. And you also have solely theoretical arguments in a papers as well I guess.
It might be a difference in the humanities where you can start with a premise or question and then while doing research you change your questions and argument because you find things that were previously unknown to you. Ofc I could also find nothing, that is perfectly fine in the end. But saying: in the Kalkwerk a big blue car is not found because Konrad doesn't like cars is a stupid thesis. And let's not forget more and more papers are published that only find something positive or negate something positive. But few(er) papers are published were you say oh I found nothing. The latter makes less sense in the humanities because humanities are not based on experiments you don't have a lab to built an experimental arrangement that can be repeated by others. You just have a text that is already written, you can just built arguments that are replicable for a reader of that argument or not.

>And just being aware of the author being aware of it and seemingly building your premise from there seems a bit weak, because it's just an assumption

It's not an assumption because there is empirical material that proves that he was. But other than that you are right, it is weak to conclude from the authors life. I did not do this in the text btw, I argue from just inside the text, the author was never an element of my argument. However, what I find interesting is that you say it is weak while a few posts above you said the author needs to step in to tell us what it all really meant. Maybe it helps to know that literary studies are working with a model of sender and receiver in a way (author->narrator->reader). The reading experience will vary from background, experience, expectations, knowledge, etc. that is also why I think it is stupid to say art must make me feel something personally or it i isn't art. If you don't have the background, experience or knowledge to feel something from a piece of art, that is your problem to a certain degree. Other people's knowledge, background or experience is different and classifies for feelings.

That said, if you think perspectivism is useless than we can circle back to the beginning: humanities and hard sciences have different perspectives...

>kinda directly contradicts perspectivism, doesn't it?

I'm not arguing from a perspectivist standpoint but I talk ABOUT perspectivism that is done inside the text.

>So my thesis is that talking about perspectivism is a useless undertaking because each new perspectivist analysis is victim to its own perspectivism and so on.

Again, I talk ABOUT perspectivism in the book. You want to start a philosophical discussion about something that is not the point of this analysis. You missed the mark.
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No. 71449
>>71445
>Start with something easier, then.

I've read Atkins book on chemistry and Paul Nurse book on life sciences, I think it was also you who reacted to this in the literature thread. And it indeed helped me already to understand somethings better I read later involving topics from chemistry and the life sciences.
Mathematics is important to me though since for my topic of interests in the humanities it could prove very important to understand mathematics in order to better judge my own thinking about system thinkings cultural history.
>>
No. 71452
imagine building a mental construct avatar out of things that arbitrarily happened to have happened to you lmao
can't relate
>>
No. 71465
>>71448
>So hard scientists are not interested in how material, cultural and social reality relate?
So humanities are not interested in how a flagellum works or what the NMR spectrum of caffeine looks like?
What kind of argument is that? Those are questions from way out of my field and if they don't help me grow my microbes more reliably or increase my analytics throughput, why would I care?
Or am I supposed to stop my research, first assess its material, cultural and social reality connections, just o come to the conclusion that it's useless anyway and just stop?
What the actual fuck do you want?

>As far as I know people can decide for themselves how they will view a thing, they could very well all alternate between at least two views.
Yeah except if you're actually forced to talk about it. Nobody stands next to me and asks me about the implications of mammogenesis when I am jacking off.

>So nothing one would like to see in a paper.
Exactly.

>As far as I know a scientific experiment starts with a premise and the conclusion then would be that the premise is true or not.
Yes, and that is provable by the results obtained during the experimentation.
How do you obtain these results? You only interpret the book in a way that is already biased by your premise and are thus more likely to develop the arguments toward supporting your premise.
And if you really aren't doing it in such a placative way like the example with the blue car, you will most likely not obtain any results that completely invalidate that premise.

>But few(er) papers are published were you say oh I found nothing.
Which is a shame, actually. But there is a great possibility it can happen.

>The latter makes less sense in the humanities because humanities are not based on experiments you don't have a lab to built an experimental arrangement that can be repeated by others.
Yes, and that is exactly what I have been saying earlier.

>However, what I find interesting is that you say it is weak while a few posts above you said the author needs to step in to tell us what it all really meant.
No, I suggested that by building upon your argumentation. Why are you always pretending like I made dogmatic statements when I was merely trying to unravel the irregularities in your argumentation?

>That said, if you think perspectivism is useless than we can circle back to the beginning: humanities and hard sciences have different perspectives...
And just like that I wonder, again, why you are so butthurt towards the "hard sciences". Where does that inferiority complex come from? Almost nobody in the "hard sciences" cares about humanities, but from you I get the impression that humanities are obsessed.

>I'm not arguing from a perspectivist standpoint but I talk ABOUT perspectivism that is done inside the text.
But you said yourself that in humanities the researchers do not separate themselves from their subject as "hard sciences" researchers do, so how can you then talk ABOUT perspectivism if not from a strict observer position? Isn't that how "hard sciences" work?

Seriously man, you're only getting only more and more obscure.
Didn't you mention some kind of breakthrough you had some time ago that would make your ideas better understandable? Maybe it's time to get that one out.
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No. 71470
>>71465
>Or am I supposed to stop my research, first assess its material, cultural and social reality connections, just o come to the conclusion that it's useless anyway and just stop?
What the actual fuck do you want?

Why are you so pressed, yeah I think that you could and should understand your research from a different perspective than your internal view.

>Yeah except if you're actually forced to talk about it [...]

Cmon what shitty comparison is that? Same with natural science or any thing else, you can't hold six perspectives on one thing in time simultaniously. That doesn't mean an object will forever lose all its different properties that are important to a specific perspective. Just because your teacher gave you a trauma for 90min it doesn't mean that analyzing art sucks every bit of joy out of it. You yourself said you are able to differentiate. Photons or boobs, you could think about the boobs and a second later about the photons and it wouldn't dismiss thequality of boobs to you.

>You only interpret the book in a way that is already biased by your premise and are thus more likely to develop the arguments toward supporting your premise.

Eh, this happens in natural sciences as well no? You make look for promising thesis to test no? I can make a thesis and then look what the book got to offer. I can read the book and make an argument about the book and support it. And argument is an argument and it needs to be stable. There are anthropological studies on science labs and the making of the paper is not what the paper in the end states, the going about is different, cannot say muchabout it though, just skimmed through and had to decide that it is too much to read and not close to my actual field of interest. What we are debating here all the time is not my main interest, it is not far away though

>No, I suggested that by building upon your argumentation. Why are you always pretending like I made dogmatic statements when I was merely trying to unravel the irregularities in your argumentation?

I said that that Bernhard read Nietzsche and Wittgenstein and talked about them. But I did so only to please your little phantasy about the author as point of reference for an analysis in: >>71424
>the author doesn't step forward and tells us

You imply that the author will reveal the inner workings of a text to us and nobody else. But I said that is not how it works, a theory of narration, of literature, of culture is necessary to situate a text in a cultural or literture context or system. The author doesn't provide the theories of greater coherence which they are part of, only an artifact up for scrutiny.

>Almost nobody in the "hard sciences" cares about humanities, but from you I get the impression that humanities are obsessed.

I'm invested in epistemological and ontological questions as well as culture and knowledge as system and reality. Large parts of humanities aren't specifically interested in these question in that manner. And pls stop the butthurt argument, ad hominem and pathology doesn't help us in the questions that are at stake. You don't seem to understand that I'm interested in the coming together of different epistemologies and ontological views. They are separate. So what do we have, just different layers of reality, but how do they relate, they aren't actually separate, are they, just functionally. That is my question, got it? That is why I'm both interested in culture as reality and what the sciences do and propose as reality and how they in the end internmingle. You yourself made the distinction between nature/natural laws (not man-made) and culture (entirely man made). Now, it could be one question to ask how they interfere and how that separation might not hold up in reality, only analytically. But what to make of entirely man-made, when it is also penetrating the realm of science, science is not outside culture in the end, but science is treated as such, has its own internal argument to treat culture as outside of science, free of bias, etc. thanks to a universal structure and universal laws that they propose to have been discovered by them. And science works.

>But you said yourself that in humanities the researchers do not separate themselves from their subject as "hard sciences" researchers do, so how can you then talk ABOUT perspectivism if not from a strict observer position? Isn't that how "hard sciences" work?

They don't in a sense. There is cultural theory that says ok we ourselves are object and subject, we are part of culture that we try to analyse. just like you need a brain to analyse a brain. That is a theory of culture and an epistemology. Perspectivism is close to constructivism and constructivism is large in cultural studies as you said, scholar tend to understand culture as man-made.

What I do methodologically and what Bernhards novel is about are two different things, you just mix them up now. Why do you do this? Well because Bernhards book takes a philosophical stance that is also discussed in epistemology and thus also in some cultural theories.
And you think you reveal a well kept secret about perspectivism but you don't, perspectives and constructivists know that it is circular and that their own theories fall under their thesis, surely something that blows a natural scientist's mind, circularity is not a good thing, surely not when you want to find one truth about reality.

https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/9781501741616/html
This is the book I used as a theory of narration that guided my analysis. You need a theory o narration to talk about narration. The unreliable narrator comes from narrative theory as well, it is a concept one uses in order to analyze a literary text. Thanks to this theory I'm able to scrutinize the book and can talk about form and content of the book and relate the two, to make an argument about the text itself. If you want to talk about a cultural artifact or phenomenon you must have a formal system to describe and analyze this phenomenon/artifact/data and every humanities discipline has such a formal system these days. In contrast to the 19th century for example were art was talked about in a poetic language as well. Useless if you want to make it systematic and find an order, just like one wants to find out the order of nature in the natural science btw.

And above all, I don't see how perspectivism forbids treating Bernhards book from a observer position?

What I want to know is, what to make of the fact that cultural reality is constructed and matter and its movement isn't. Science is like a medium in both cases. What to make of that, I'm still not sure, these are bigger questions in the end.
And I still am puzzled how you ride around the scientific method and the scientific world view of reductionism and deduction and them to critizes the humanities for not proposing in the same fashion when something is entirely man made, it doesn't then subsume to what scientists found to be universal ongoing, since that is part of nature. What should they do if they are their own object, caught up in a cultural dynamic?
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No. 71475
>>71470
>Why are you so pressed, yeah I think that you could and should understand your research from a different perspective than your internal view.
Again, WHY? I still don't have any answer. You just say I should and it's important, but without explaining why I should and why it is important. Again, will it help me in any way?
I get it, it's your interest and it might indeed be interesting to think about it, but if nothing useful for me can come out of it, why would I think about it in the first place?
I have enough other things to think about. Thinking is my job and it's exhausting.
And so far, you have failed to bring out why it is so important for me and why I should care.

>Eh, this happens in natural sciences as well no? You make look for promising thesis to test no?
Obviously I try to get a good idea of what is and what is not possible before I start designing the experiment and then of course design the experiment in order to maximize my chances of finding what I am looking for, but in the end, I don't have any influence on the actual results because there could be some yet unknown factor completely ruining my careful setup. But in e.g. a book you don't have these "unknown factors", unless right in the middle of your research some lost pages resurface that completely turn your whole starting thesis on its head. This is the kind of setback experimentators have to deal with.
Concerning the making of papers, we are already verging again into the world of academic publishing, which is a whole other monster I'd prefer to see dead.

>So what do we have, just different layers of reality, but how do they relate, they aren't actually separate, are they, just functionally. That is my question, got it?
That's not a question, that's a gordian knot of questions, ugh, too many commas. I mean, you must be able to formulate a clear "what do I want", don't you? The intricacies can be discussed in detail after that.

>science is not outside culture in the end, but science is treated as such, has its own internal argument to treat culture as outside of science
I don't think anyone has ever claimed that

>And science works.
Yes. gigachad.tiff

>And you think you reveal a well kept secret about perspectivism but you don't, perspectives and constructivists know that it is circular and that their own theories fall under their thesis, surely something that blows a natural scientist's mind, circularity is not a good thing, surely not when you want to find one truth about reality.
Yes and this has been my whole point the whole time, thanks for finally acknowledging. And this why I am so confused: culture and science are easy to bring together, as obviously science developed through/from culture, but maybe we should make a clearer distinction between "science" as a means of understanding natural laws better and the natural laws themselves, because those are independent from culture, in fact you could say that while culture has certainly been steered by natural laws, the natural laws themselves don't care about culture or humanity in general.
And since natural laws are natural laws and will never budge or change now matter how much you discuss them, a scientist's mind might not understand why you try to do exactly that by insinuating that nothing is real, that the machines measuring temperature don't actually measure temperature or could measure temperature in another way and that viewing "science" from that other layer of reality will change anything about the speed of light for example.

>And above all, I don't see how perspectivism forbids treating Bernhards book from a observer position?
I never claimed anything like that, I merely said it was ironic. You could say I found a bit of ironic humor in that. Like a crying clown.

>What I want to know is, what to make of the fact that cultural reality is constructed and matter and its movement isn't.
Connected to the paragraph above, but why make anything of it? Why is it so important to you? Does it scare you that you're just some bald ape moving through a vast nothingness on a vast somethingness that doesn't care about you in the slightest, but for some reason gave you enough self-awareness to be able to think stuff like this in the first place?

>And I still am puzzled how you ride around the scientific method and the scientific world view of reductionism and deduction and them to critizes the humanities for not proposing in the same fashion when something is entirely man made, it doesn't then subsume to what scientists found to be universal ongoing, since that is part of nature.
I don't understand this sentence, please reconstruct.

>What should they do if they are their own object, caught up in a cultural dynamic?
Yeah well, how about you tell me?
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No. 71486 Kontra
>>71475
> but if nothing useful for me can come out of it, why would I think about it in the first place?

nothing for your niche for sure, just to see yourself from a different angle maybe.

>But in e.g. a book you don't have these "unknown factors", unless right in the middle of your research some lost pages resurface that completely turn your whole starting thesis on its head. This is the kind of setback experimentators have to deal with.

A book is a man-made thing and doesn't cohere to the laws and "conveniences" of nature, thus different methods need to be applied in order to say something about it. Theories of literature and culture that try to be more formalizing since at least WW2 try to do this. But since man-made objects meet-man made theories in a man made culture it is tricky.
Nonetheless you make it sound like everything goes, which is just not true. A text/work of art is "data" that need to be interpreted and that needs an argument. You just don't collect measurements, you have to put them together and in context .

>And since natural laws are natural laws and will never budge or change now matter how much you discuss them, a scientist's mind might not understand why you try to do exactly that by insinuating that nothing is real, that the machines measuring temperature don't actually measure temperature or could measure temperature in another way and that viewing "science" from that other layer of reality will change anything about the speed of light for example.

The epistemological questions are still not ruled out totally, yeah, science works the culture and method of science since the 16th century made great steps and archived a lot. But will this method be enough, can it cover everything that can be known? It was enormously successful and still is, but is that a guarantee and something working and something being true are not necessarily the same. But this is a philosophical issue, not just a scientific one, depending on what science is and if it can transform itself through itself in order to be quite different to what it has been. You know what I mean is and you demonstrate it, that these question are not important to you as long as it seems to work. And that is nothing surprising, as you said there is only a certain amount of time to think and do things.

>Why is it so important to you? Does it scare you that you're just some bald ape moving through a vast nothingness on a vast somethingness that doesn't care about you in the slightest, but for some reason gave you enough self-awareness to be able to think stuff like this in the first place?

I'm just interested in how things work? Stop pathologizing me. Why did you do a Phd, weren't you interested and fascinated by the stuff around you and wanted to find out how and why that is?
And the vast nothingness an nihilism that you want to put up here is a matter of relation, surely the universe doesn't care, it cannot even care by definition. But the reality of culture makes you care among other things.

>I don't understand this sentence, please reconstruct.

Culture is man made, its doesn't obey natural law then. How to go about the scrutiny of something man made with something man made? The accusation that humanities are not scientific because no scientific method seems like a straw man then, because the objects and the constellation of inquiry are not the same.

What I go on about here all the time since the discussion between us started besides the usual flame war are philosophical questions that ofc have their ties with culture after all. I'm interested in these question on the side, they don't necessarily make up my more niche interested which is history of XYZ and it borders these big philosophical questions. Science or humanities, both are tied to philosophical questions. Though in the hard sciences it has been decided in the day to day work because efficient and working. You don't do philosophy in physics, you calculate things and do experiments to prove another particles existence. In the humanities it still plays a role. Another question would be for instance how the scientific endeavor shaped overall thinking and how this thinking shapes other areas outside of science.
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No. 71497
29 kB, 600 × 485
>>71452
I can't imagine. Could you explain at length what you mean?
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No. 71498
>>71486
>A book is a man-made thing and doesn't cohere to the laws and "conveniences" of nature
The book certainly does. The contents of the book don't necessarily. Of course that opens up a whole other branch of philosophical argumentation, in particular about reality and the reality of books.

>It was enormously successful and still is, but is that a guarantee and something working and something being true are not necessarily the same.
The beauty about it is how it all falls into place. The way the periodic table is organized, mathematical patterns we find in nature and so on.
It all just fits too well for being completely culturally grown.
In fact I would say, and not just because I'm slightly drunk, that nature, beyond its desire for entropy, is vastly more ordered than anything humans have managed to come up with.

>And that is nothing surprising, as you said there is only a certain amount of time to think and do things.
Yes, and I wish I had more time, or faster processing speed.

>I'm just interested in how things work? Stop pathologizing me.
Why do you feel I am "pathologizing" you? Why even use that word in the first place? Because I sure as hell wouldn't have described what I am doing like that, but you seem to know more about you than I do (obviously).
Just like you are delving into this obscure topic we are discussing, I am trying to understand why you are doing this and thus trying to delve into your mind, which is really a tough undertaking with how little you are sharing.

>Culture is man made, its doesn't obey natural law then.
Here I am disagreeing. Man obeys natural laws and thus everything man creates does too.
You can't will yourself into hovering, even if you were to build a religion about it.
And even your thoughts, which lead to ideas which lead to different manifestations of culture are subject to natural laws.

>You don't do philosophy in physics, you calculate things and do experiments to prove another particles existence.
Funny enough, physics is probably the natural science closest to philosophy, especially when you're doing theoretical physics, which is, exaggeratedly speaking, from a biologist's point of view really just philosophy written in maths.

On a side note for any interested reader who is not the one I am arguing with: I just scrolled through the thread and something about the length and girth of our posts made me giggle. I apologize for the both of us drowning out your musings, ABER ES IST NUNMAL DEUTSCHLAND HIER!

P.S.: I never perceived our discussions as flamewars and I apologize if you were under the impression. I have an agitated, polemic style of argumentation, which I am aware of, but in the end, for me it's just friendly banter. I promise I wouldn't beat you up if we met irl.
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No. 71501
>>71498
>I am trying to understand why you are doing this

I want to understand things, how want to know as well how things fall in place, but the realm is a different one than natural sciences. It might not be very clear to me either, I've gone through quite many different areas of academic research in the past two years. I see more and more connections but the details, which finding out takes very much time, are in large very hazily available to me atm. I could list articles and books but that would be useless.
Media studies are philosophy by other means it was I read lately and from a research into media, it seems that media is one way to look at how things are getting organized and organize through media a medium is not limited to technical stuff, an animal could be a medium for something as well.

>It all just fits too well for being completely culturally grown.

Constructivists for instance don't deny matter and an external world (that would be die hard idealism I think or solipsism). I also don't think it is completely cultural. I'm not interested in situating it in an either/or fashion, I'm interested in the middle, the supposed border or transition, passage, basically that which is still unexplored so to speak.

>Here I am disagreeing. Man obeys natural laws and thus everything man creates does too.
>You can't will yourself into hovering, even if you were to build a religion about it.
>And even your thoughts, which lead to ideas which lead to different manifestations of culture are subject to natural laws.

Is this a reductionist perspective? It builds from a few simple principles all up to cultural phenomena. I think (and that is part of my historic interest in history of knowledge) cultural studies adopted a system perspective that among other things was found in biology. In other words, holism and complexity and such: the whole is greater than its part and the whole has an effect in its parts.
I've yet to see how you can explain Bernhards Kalkwerk or cultural practices/techniques like writing and calculating to me by using a some mathematical equations. How to explain the cultural shifts from postwar Germany up until now? By saying it is moving atoms in a certain fashion? That is what I mean when I say culture doesn't obey natural laws, I did not talk about the human body as physical system.

How do cultural concepts and phenomena then feedback, explained via mathematics and universal laws, to make humans think and behave different than before?

>polemic style of argumentation

it can get in the way of serious discussions
>>
No. 71503
>>71501
>I'm interested in the middle, the supposed border or transition, passage, basically that which is still unexplored so to speak.
I mean, have you already found anything that hints towards its existence? With my reductionist approach I would probably assume I just need to go back far enough in history and trace the path of those divergent developments to their common root.

>How to explain the cultural shifts from postwar Germany up until now? By saying it is moving atoms in a certain fashion? That is what I mean when I say culture doesn't obey natural laws, I did not talk about the human body as physical system.
Well, why not? Why not assume some kind of butterfly effect here?
Like: A person had a certain release of hormones which led to them making a certain decision which set events in motion that caused thoughts and feelings in other people which then set other events in motion.
And as I said,
>And even your thoughts, which lead to ideas which lead to different manifestations of culture are subject to natural laws.
Your neurons are connected differently than mine and the electrical signals are moving there differently and I doubt it would be different if were were "blank slates", so to say, with a completely identical upbringing.
But it still doesn't change that the principle by which this works is the same in both of us, yet it can lead to different results, in this case different thoughts and conclusions and interests. So any culture that develops develops from the very same prerequisites (on the human side). Underneath our different phenotypes we are all built basically identically.
Which means that
>How do cultural concepts and phenomena then feedback, explained via mathematics and universal laws, to make humans think and behave different than before?
for this we might find an answer in the future, who knows? Just because I can't explain it now doesn't mean I can explain it later. Is this not what you are saying too?
Understanding the brain in a natural science way is such a young undertaking and it's really just in its infancy.
I mean we know basically nothing about how thoughts are actually taking shape, how memories are stored and so on.
But when you manage to understand that, why shouldn't you also be able to eventually understand and build a model of cultural developments?
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No. 71505
395 kB, 1500 × 799
>>71497
Your "self identity", as in, the "image" or "character" that you imagine yourself as, the "person" that pops into your mind when you think "this is me", is merely a mental construct. It is an amalgamation of all the things you have done, or were done to you, or people you've been close to (family, friends), or media (books/games/movies) you've consumed and "related to" (internalized as a part of yourself).

You can formulate this "avatar" or "person" by describing all the properties it has. Lie, try to describe "who you are" right now. "I am a person who was born at such time in such place, to such parents, I like such and such things, I believe in such and such ideas. I have such and such persons who are involved in my life. My plans/hopes for the future are such, and they stem from experiences I had in X age, when I was first [whatever]..."

The amalgamation of all of these thing is what you tell yourself about yourself. Or rather, the amalgamation is a sort of "avatar" or voodoo puppet that you invest your "identity" into. This collection of memories, experiences, people, events, places, etc., is what constitutes this total definition of "me" (You).

This Frankenstein's monster of concepts and ideas and events is what you see as the thing that defines what is "you". Just like a definition of a word in a dictionary is a collection of other words that form a meaning that combines all of the words, the definition of what "you" are is a collection of things and memories and events and things you associate with "yourself", that comprise the ultimate Meaning of "You".

The trick is that this mental construct of events and ideas, this description of "You" is completely arbitrary. It's just a collection of memories that you simply gave a label to, with "Me" written over it. It could be anything, it's just an arbitrary collection of memories and things.
If you're the same age as me, maybe you remember "emos" or "punks" or "real pacani", or whatever other idea some people associated with themselves at the time. Same with movies and music they liked. "This pop song I like is so me'". "This fashion style I like is so me'". "This movie I like is so `me'". And so on.

And if you're anything like the average person, you eventually "grew out" of those things, and they no longer define who you are.
But think about it. You switched one set of objects that used to define "you", for another set of objects that now define "you". If you can just change the definition of "you" through your life, like as if you simply rewrote the definition of a word in a dictionary, is there really a "word" there?
Is there really a "you" behind your "mental possessions"?

Many people go through life with some thing that threads all of their live events together, creating an illusion of a "story of life" or a "narrative" or "meaning". For some it's parents, for others it's a video game they've been playing since childhood (I first played counter-strike 1.6 as a kid, I still play CS:GO as an adult = "I am a Counter Strike person"), for others it's a genre of music they're into, whatever whatever. And that's their "identity".
OFC it can be more complex than that, usually it's multiple threads of events and people and objects that ultimately end up defining what the person is "about". But I hope the examples are a good enough illustration of the basic concept.

So, if people define themselves by certain "things", and also sometimes abandon those "things", and adopt new "things" that are "them", the question is, is there an actual, authentic "real person" underneath? Is there a "unique human individual" not defined by the circumstances of their birth, the things they consume or consumed, the people they just happened to meet in life, etc. etc.?

I claim no. There is no central, unshakable, unwavering "SELF" behind every person. We are only that what we "adopt". Which means that there is no fundamental "self" at all. On the deepest, most fundamental level, we're just observers looking at what is happening to our bodies and "personas", as the bodies go through life, autonomously, following their instincts. Essentially, we don't have "souls". Merely parameters that generally define our behavior, and the "history" of things that we did, or others did to us, as a result of those parameters. That's it.

We're along for the ride, but we're not at the steering wheel, so to say. The smallest, irreducible "thing" at the center of every person that I can see so far, is the "observer". The Mind's Eye. As in, the thing that notices all of the things that are happening to oneself, and the thing that notices that it is noticing.
If you wish to get more in tune with the "observer", or the "eye that notices", I recommend picking up meditation. Maybe of the mindfulness kind. Such as this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CN-_zzHpcdM
Sam Harris is a retard, but he made a pretty good meditation video. You should check it out.

Anyway. All of the above was said from the perspective of the "self", but also applies to the perspectives of others who are looking at your "self". As in, if you have an internal idea of "who I am", then others also have an idea of "who you are". You might think of yourself as X person, but that one cashier who sees you sometimes every week buying groceries has her own internal "avatar" or "mannequin" or "scarecrow" or your "being". You might think of yourself as "such and such", but the cashier lady sees you as "that guy who buys this and looks like this and does this". And those two entities are completely separate and irreconcilable. Some stranger's idea of who you are is as valid as your own idea of who you are, because both are mental constructs.
Such cases.
>>
No. 71508
>>71505
Thanks, now I understand what you mean. I would rather associate myself with personality traits and "mental garbage" than with observer.

Me being "CS-GO person" is not just mental construct and historical fact but a matter of current objective reality. I know much about the game, I'm skilled in it because of my experience, playing it gives me joy. It's all about present and future. I've never played CS-GO, it's a made up example
Memory itself is not part of personality, but having a memory in heda is part of personality.

> the question is, is there an actual, authentic "real person" underneath
"Human is like a river".txt

> Essentially, we don't have "souls". Merely parameters that generally define our behavior, and the "history" of things that we did, or others did to us, as a result of those parameters. That's it.
I'm fine with calling these things "soul". Not in religious but in everyday meaning of the word.

> You might think of yourself as X person, but that one cashier who sees you sometimes every week buying groceries has her own internal "avatar" or "mannequin" or "scarecrow" or your "being".
Yes, but it's not related much to the topic. Different people can have different image of even an objective thing. Like you and old lady from accounting department have different view of same printer machine in office.

I'll try the meditation, let's see what it's like.
>>
No. 71509
So called "memes" are hostile mind-parasites that live and reproduce by feeding on the glucose your brain would have used on other things instead.

Here's some tips on how to stop transmitting MTDs (mentally transpitted diseases)
  1. Stop thinking. Abstinence is the greatest cure.
  2. If you accidentally have a thought, to not vocalize it or share it on social media, or otherwise communicate it to another person.
  3. Cut down on social media and academic writing. It's fine to read or watch things, but refrain from posting or "writing".
  4. When in the presence of friends, avoid talking about anything other than a) small talk, or b) descriptions of things that are happening in immediate vicinity. Example: "did you see that guy trip? he almost fell flat on his face!" - GOOD. "Did you see that guy trip? Let's discuss rigid body dynamics as it pertains to human organisms, and the psycho-social implications of such" - BAD.
  5. If a friend or a loved one tries to solicit an opinion, do NOT generate any new thoughts, and especially do not vocalize them. Instead, try to give harmless nonanswers such as "it was okay", "mhm", "ok", "i'm really not that into politics" and so on
Resist the plague of the 21st century, Keep Your Mind Clean, and help others do the same.
>>
No. 71513
160 kB, 1024 × 768
>>71509
No, memes are parts of humanity's collective consciousness represented by rage comics and anime mascots. Praise God for being born in time when you can directly connect to noosphere instead of vegetating in mere physical reality.
>>
No. 71523
>>71503
Concerning the butterfly effect, I'm a bit surprised about the one person with one hormone, because aren't butterfly effects happening a lot? That would be a reduction to great people doing things. What about "herd effects"? And how are the hormone levels tied to the form of economy that person in living in? All these things could condition the persons decision. I was listening to a shirt Murray Gell-Mann lecture from 1994 since I atm I do soure dwelling concerning history of complexity thinking and he was part of the Santa Fe Institute that came about in the late 1980s and I had the same thought, he gave examples but it sounded quite "simple" and not very complex from a historians point of view somehow.

And concerning culture: What it would mean is that Thomas Bernhard and TikToks meme culture could be translated into a mathematical equation and I'm not sure if that is really possible, is it a reduction or a translation, a translation might indicate a sort of lack, you cannot translate a novel 1:1 if you now what I mean, in this case translate two different realities. Which would bring up the question if the concrete (your own life world experience for instance, qualia etc.) can be always completely represented by something abstract.
>>
No. 71524
Having humour is a great thing. But in general, to enjoy watching comedians perform you need to be a bit sadistic. Everyone liked jokes about how stupid women or an ethnic group were back in the day. Comedians also reminds me of idolatry tbh, all of your attention is on one individual and how hilarious they are compared to yourself.

t. humourless germanic
>>
No. 71526
>>71523
You shouldn't take everything so literal. It was a quick example and in no way meant to be a "reduction to great people doing things".
It's about causality and miniscule things being able to set in motion a chain of events that lead to something big.
There has never been a case of a million people waking up in the morning at the exact same time and having the exact same thought of deciding on a new political direction. It's all a process, started by few, but not necessarily "great" people. Think of that picture with the garden of forking paths.

>And how are the hormone levels tied to the form of economy that person in living in?
The people living under the city in the Metropolis economy certainly had a vitamin D deficiency which would lead to completely different hormone levels than e.g. the Sons would have.
A factory worker in the first world has different hormone levels than a farmer in the third world.
And not necessarily connected to economy, but testosterone levels in men in industrialized nations have decreased strongly in the past decades.
Psychosomatic conditions are real, stress can make you sick.
People are unhappy when their Dopamine equilibrium is disturbed. Shitty living conditions can do that, for example.
But it all boils down the individual, I must admit that. The masses and collective consciousness might be its own entity.

>And concerning culture: What it would mean is that Thomas Bernhard and TikToks meme culture could be translated into a mathematical equation and I'm not sure if that is really possible, is it a reduction or a translation, a translation might indicate a sort of lack, you cannot translate a novel 1:1 if you now what I mean, in this case translate two different realities.
That's not how it works though. You obviously don't just 1:1 "translate" the words into formulae or something like you would translate it in a human-spoken language. But let's take a step back and look at your Tiktok example - why shouldn't it eventually be possible to predict what the next big meme will be?
And not just like now with data collection and observing trends, but actually predicting those trends.
But you're right in your incredulity that at the moment it's still sci-fi - but that doesn't mean it's entirely impossible.

>Which would bring up the question if the concrete (your own life world experience for instance, qualia etc.) can be always completely represented by something abstract.
Are books not abstract? I can see the words with my eyes, but everything else needs abstraction in my head, or at least the ability to deal with letters themselves being abstractions of the reality I live in, or what I perceive as my reality.
>>
No. 71527
>>71526
>Are books not abstract? I can see the words with my eyes, but everything else needs abstraction in my head, or at least the ability to deal with letters themselves being abstractions of the reality I live in, or what I perceive as my reality

Sure, but that is a thing I still can't catch, what is the relation of abstract and concrete. Abstractions are real, they are part of reality, that is why people who tell me I should live instead of books don't understand that the obsession with abstractions is part of living and that abstractions have material forces so to speak, but how exactly the concrete and abstract relate then is beyond me really, atm. There is no congruency is what I think.

>The masses and collective consciousness might be its own entity.

Isn't that the point were we get circular causality that is different from a causality that comes with reductionist standing? When collectives are agents so to speak like individuals are, who is causing who to do what?
>>
No. 71528 Kontra
>>71527
And you not only see things, that is just one layer of experience or concreteness.
>>
No. 71530
>>71527
>Abstractions are real, they are part of reality, that is why people who tell me I should live instead of books don't understand that the obsession with abstractions is part of living
I think it's because those abstractions via books are seen as proxy experiences, in contrast to the rl experiences that come with strong feelings and possibly danger.
>>
No. 71551
2,2 MB, 1920 × 1080
My abstract was approved. It wasn't so much "criticism" as much as getting some big boy Sinologist to "support" the presentation taking place.
I actually know who did it, since when we were discussing the topic with the workshop and who we're past the deadline for approval, they chuckled when I mentioned them possibly giving it to my supervisor.
Yeah, my supervisor on a thesis about Chinese legalism will surely not suspect that a college which I'm part of asks him to approve an abstract on Chinese legalism. Megakek.

Had lunch with that girl again today. We went to a Turkish place. It was okay. She also read some of my poetry translations and then accompanied me back to campus despite having no classes like me.

Finally assembled the Classical Chinese deck. Found an efficient method to make the csv file so it took like an hour all together.
All together I have like 800 hanzi to learn and refresh my memory on for the exam next week.
>>
No. 71555
91 kB, 1500 × 1500
I will finally get new glasses by the end of next week it seems. Finally found something that fits and that isn't expensive. I gave old values from 2019, maybe it would have been better to get a check on my eyes before, maybe I could have gotten an extra sharpness at greater distance out of it, there was no significant change to my eyes since a few years, but still. Anyway, new glasses right now from the same dealer would be 50€. Still a payable amount. Though I never got glasses from them, so have to wait for the quality.
>>
No. 71556
>>71555
>Anyway, new glasses right now from the same dealer would be 50€
That's dirt cheap for glasses.
I got my last frames in 2016 and paid about 400 or so for frames+second most expensive lenses.
But now that you mentioned it, I should probably get my eyes checked in the near future and haven't seen an ophthalmologist in almost 20 years. I notice my astigmatism getting worse; having a job working with computers really doesn't help here.
>>
No. 71558
50 kB, 443 × 750
>>71556
I could have gotten lenses that would clear from condensation faster and that repel dirt better for +60€. But I'm not exactly bathing in money at hand right now so I said fuck it, going cheap. My last frames were 80€ second hand and 120€ for glasses. Dunno I got the glasses from a European wide chain that makes cheap designer like frames and also has a cheap lens production as well.
There are frames for 400€ and more, but tbh then I would consider laser instead, it is cheaper in the long run and glasses are annoying in the end as well tbh, while I think my glasses don't ruin my look, I'd never wear them just for the sake of wearing it like an accessory or because some people get a kink from it.
>>
No. 71559
>>71558
>I could have gotten lenses that would clear from condensation faster and that repel dirt better for +60€.
Does that actually work? I don't think that stuff was on the list back then, just those bluefilters for screen work or something.

I probably would have gotten laser surgery years ago, but since so far there's no method to actually heal the wounds, I'd rather play it safe with glasses than risk getting blind from slight trauma. The moment they can actually do that without a loose flap it's goodbye glasses.
>>
No. 71564 Kontra
>>71559
>does it work

Never tried it myself. I have bluefilter for my screens so I guess I don't need them in glasses as well.
>>
No. 71570 Kontra
84 kB, 1170 × 580
the glasses might not be finished by next week, I suffer on the first world. On top of that my circulatory thoughts on one of my classmates grow but she isn't in town this weekend. It feels like there is too much time passing in which we don't see each other and I cannot find out if she is interested in more as well.
>>
No. 71571
>>71570
>and I cannot find out if she is interested in more as well
Have you tried asking her?
If she likes you she likes you already, even with spilling spaghetti and being assburger.
If she doesn't like you now she most likely never will.
It's better to clear things up as soon as possible instead of suffering from oneitis.

t. been there done that
>>
No. 71575
>>71571
Yeah, but meeting her again isn't nice then when it turns out she doesn't, so I gotta see her in person a bit more and then I can judge it better before I spill any spaghetti because I would just get more touchy and she seems like the kind of person that would go along then so I can be safe in my judgement. In fact we've been sitting close to each other one time and there was not really a need to be this close, that is when I noticed that maybe she has some interest and let me know. Back then I didn't know that much about her, I still don't but she left some impression on me (and she is "my type", apparently)
>>
No. 71576 Kontra
>>71575
*wasn't a need to sit close
>>
No. 71578 Kontra
52 kB, 350 × 495
>>71575
>Why is she sitting so close to me? There is ample seating and there is no need to be in such close proximity.
>>
No. 71589
>>71575
> but meeting her again isn't nice then when it turns out she doesn't,
Meeting her while longing for her and not telling her is also not nice, but the first scenario enables you to move on.
Taking that step is scary, but it's better in the long run.
>>
No. 71590
>>71589
Maybe I'm just lonely. I know what you are talking about from experience, but I rather see her again and try to be close than tell her now via messenger.
>>
No. 71591
>>71589
When I made that post I was thinking about writing her directly (she responded to a group chat) and just to say I'll send a plane to collect her. Basically, because I would like to do something with her on the weekend. (I didn't as you can deduce)
>>
No. 71592 Kontra
>>71591
Just found out it is an airplane, you can't say plane. How very German it feels to write like this.
>>
No. 71593 Kontra
>>71592
Hm? "Plane" is a widespread clipping of "airplane" in English.
>>
No. 71623
>>
No. 71624 Kontra
>>71623
W H Y Brick, W H Y ?
>>
No. 71645
168 kB, 1280 × 1280
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/09526951211068995

A rather brilliant paper on a neoliberal overlord network (Jeffery Epstein gets mentioned!) that was born between science, business and tech, encompassing right-wing funders and liberal progressivism all in the form of a libertarian chameleon and that has its institutional boundary in the Santa Fe Institute, which was at the beginning of its founding interested in complexity as a phenomenon and aimed at being scientific enterprise but bc lack of funding turned into what it has become until now:

>Since the late 1980s, the Institute has acted as an important node in a network of elite actors in business, politics, and media working to construct a new leadership class —the stewards of the New Economy and today’s
philanthrocapitalism; the creative class, the social entrepreneurs, the Santa Fe Institute libertarians. [19]

A really cool article that explains certain thinking and also how complexity and biological knowledge (evolution, ecology) were drawn into economic thinking in the 1990s to justify deregulatory policies.

>The consultant Michael Rothschild helped popularize Arthur’s work in his bestseller Bionomics: The Inevitability of Capitalism (Rothschild, 1990), a book that in turn ‘floated around’ SFI. Rothschild pressed the SFI equation of capitalist markets and biological organisms and other natural systems to its logical political conclusion: capitalism was literally a part of nature and any attempt to interfere with its natural functioning was doomed to failure. [12]
>The best way to revolutionize a firm, it turned out, was to make it more like a complex adaptive system. In 1999, the basic principles of the SFI approach to corporate restructuring appeared in a volume titled The Biology of Business: Decoding the Natural Laws of Enterprise, edited by entrepreneur and SFI Business Network member John Clippinger and with a foreword from Esther Dyson. The volume argued that complexity science elucidated the wisdom of the quintessential New Economy organizational reforms endorsed by consultancies such as McKinsey, also an SFI Business Network member. The structure of old corporations was too unwieldy, bureaucratic, and inward-looking to permit rapid adaptation and innovation in a dynamic, constantly evolving marketplace.
>>
No. 71655
Accidentally drop a small plastic cap in the bathroom. It bounces on the sink and falls into the garbage. Hm, sitting on top...I'll just pick it u- and I knock it further into the can. No problem, I'll just reach in and gr- push it all the way to the bottom. Dump entire bin of tissues, dental floss and bandages onto the floor, retrieve cap.

Another minor tragedy interrupting my tranquil day.
>>
No. 71689
>>
No. 71690
>>71689
>>that Runglish
My.
>>
No. 71693 Kontra
>>71689
Good to know such cringeness is a universal phenomenon.
>>
No. 71698
>>71689
My mother once proposed to watch "Hetalia: Axis Powers" because her friend's daughter likes it. We forced ourselves to watch it for 3 minutes. That was really awkward.
>>
No. 71713 Kontra
>>71698
Ngl I don't see Polandball fundmentally different from it, which is probably why I never really enjoyed Polandball.
>>
No. 71731
253 kB, 869 × 909
Paternal grandmother seems to be on her last leg. She fell over last week and broke her arm, and now she fell over again. Her mind isn't clear any more. My father is very sad and frustated. Usually he "escapes" into work from family related things like these (and it's not like my grandmother gave him that great if a childhood as the neglected second son), but he can't do it this time.

Maternal grandmother fell over too and she's in the hospital. She might have covid. We don't know much. Mother travelled down to meet with her, but wasn't let in due to covid. She isn't answering the phone. My mother thinks she either got operated on or is on a ventilator.

So the family is very stressed. I can't really help in any meaningful way, really.
If they have to go, I hope they don't suffer much. Ageing is fucking ugly.

I'm cramming hanzi like no tomorrow, but it feels like it's too much.
I'd also need to learn like 12 words of Latin and do a translation from The Importance of Being Ernest but I'm going to bail on it most likely and tell the lecturer I can't do it, but here's the semester-closing assignment for our other class.
I actually feel dizzy. I want to throw up.

>>71698
Holy shit :DD
I can feel the cringe and embarrassment radiating across time and cultures.
Amazing.
>>
No. 71739 Kontra
Waking up at 5am tomorrow for work.
Pray for me, Ernst.
>>
No. 71742
>>71739
Me currently doing that, and it feels like a sleep in.
t. former 3:30am riser
>>
No. 71800
Two Korean girls were both looking at me in a train. I tried to answer with a little smile but they didn’t seem to respond, they then started to film me. I turn around and see nothing of high interest behind me. Minutes after, it turns out that a beautiful sunset was hidden behind me at a weird angle. I’m both relieved and frustrated.
>>
No. 71803
>>71800
Didn't you get the heatings when they were filming? Even when you might think these are nothing uncommon things in Korea to do I would get heatenings just from knowing I'm videotaped by some strangers. Regardless if I'm the object or not. Thinking of it, not long ago somebody was taking shots from a bridge while I and several other people were in frame walking below.

A cute was smiling at me while I made my way to university, she was walking next to a friend but made the effort. It hurts a bit because it's just that moment en passant I'm having mild depression today, so I couldn't smile really anyway.
>>
No. 71817
>>71800
How did you know they were Korean or even girls?
>>
No. 71829
>>71803
>Didn't you get the heatings when they were filming?
No, but I had prior experience with east Asians taking pictures of me and other waito piggus for no apparent reasons and with little regards for consent so I didn’t take it like something too abnormal. I was more displeased by the lack of interaction than the taking of a picture.

> A cute was smiling at me while I made my way to university, she was walking next to a friend but made the effort. It hurts a bit because it's just that moment en passant I'm having mild depression today, so I couldn't smile really anyway.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=iKkLjHAvf1k

>>71817
It didn’t sound Mandarin or Japanese when they talked and looked east Asians. I had to assume their gender
>>
No. 71869
>>71829
A lot of people look East Asian without being Korean, Chinese or Japanese.
I'd describe Korean as a version of Japanese where you just cannot find a single familiar word for some weird reason - and with some strongly aspirated consonants.
>>
No. 71923
351 kB, 549 × 679
I reset the trip odometer on my car to measure gas milage. Hadn't done that in over a year, and the old measurement included a lot of Florida driving traffic. Results after one week of comfy western NY driving: mpg jumped from 19.7 to 23.8.

tbh there's not much that I missed about this place(grew up here), but I love the empty roads. When a traffic light cycles through from red to green I always make it, no "waiting for the next one". Changing lanes is a breeze. If I miss a turn it's easy to go down a side street and do a quick 3-pt turn and go back without worrying that I'm going to block traffic. The upside of a declining regional population.

>>71739
D-did you survive?

t.Nightshift
>>
No. 71924 Kontra
122 kB, 323 × 304
>>71923
Partial survival, slept for 12 hours once I got back. Ready to do it again.
>>
No. 71925
>>71921
Except for the point that is considered the very beginning of Capitalism, when Adam Smith wrote his shitty excuse of a book - at that time people were sold as a commodity and that was part of the economic reality that Smith was trying (unsuccesfully) to model.
>>
No. 71928
The most annoying aspect of commodification is the commodification of media/entertainment/art.

The commodification of "art" is the saddest thing.
It's like nothing has fundamental "essence" any more. Or rather, the "essence" of things doesn't matter, all is evaluated by external / surface characteristics.
It's hard to explain. But essentially, the "meaning" or "implication" of a work doesn't matter any more, what matters is only its "incidental" qualities regarding its role in the current market or zeitgeist.

Like, when a normie buys the newest Assassins Creed game, or buys a ticket to the newest Marvel movie, they're not really looking to engage with the piece of media itself, on its own terms. To them the piece of media in question is merely an "occasion", an excuse, a pivot for an activity that doesn't really concern itself with the "contents" or "essence" of the media in question.
The media in question is merely a... theme, a backdrop for another kind of activity. Likely socialization. The DotA or CS:GO or WoW nerd, or the person buying the latest Uncharted / Assassin's Creed / Tomb Raider / FIFA cares as much about the actual "contents" of the latest update, as a Halloween party goer cares about the Halloween decorations in the form of Dracula, Jack-o-lantern, Frankenstein's Monster, etc: the meanings and stories behind those objects don't matter, they're merely a backdrop for the actual entertainment, which is the social / consumerist aspect.

Within this framework, an "entertainment franchise" takes on the same function and meaning as a subscription service for a piece of computer software:
Wouldn't buying a new game in a genre where all the games are the same game, be equivalent to paying for a software update, or a recurring payment and such?
I think there's a far larger gap between "art" and "entertainment" than normally thought. I used to think that the latter is just a "bad" subset of the former, but now I think they're completely different things.
A piece of entertainment resembles more in its function a party. A release of the new avengers or star wars movie is an "occasion", an event, a cause for socialization.
It has no value in itself, it is merely the backdrop or instrument for a mass social event.
The "thing" is just a cue card to facilitate socialization, or rather an illusion of "shared historical progress". A form of Surrogate Meaning.
Such cases.
>>
No. 71930 Kontra
>>71928
When I was 12-13 and the internet didn't exist, I would rent and play many games from the local Blockbuster without any prior knowledge of them. I'd enjoy each on its own terms without any outside input or discussion with friends. That's certainly different now, our experiences are less atomised, and I would argue less subjective, because no sooner have we bought a game we're running off to find others online who have played it, joining forums or subreddits, watching streamers and engaging in the great web of parasocial relationships around the game, our own experiences being moulded by the feedback we absorb elsewhere.
>>
No. 71933 Kontra
1,5 MB, 1800 × 2358
>>71928
Adorno and Horkheimer did use the term cultural industry for a reason. Cultural commodities distract and distribute the ideology to keep people in check, simply spoken. Though for Adorno Art was about the non-identical, that which doesn't sit right, that doesn't fit, that is not as sleek as the pompadour music of the "stars" of the 1940s. That is why he liked 12-tone music.
That doesn't mean art has its meaning, it's just not important to these people you describe. A movie can have a meaning and hidden layers even though it is a Hollywood production. That said I don't agree with the essence part since I'm immersed in relational ontological shenanigans, something is only what it is in relation to other things, processes, persons etc. there is no independence, no essential pre formed Gestalt, it has to be created, made, emerge.
>>
No. 71935
When has art not been a commodity? When it was still strictly ritual use? And therefore not necessarily "art" in the first place?
Are Mozart's symphonies not art because they were commissions? Or the Sistine Chapel frescoes?
It doesn't matter if you discuss highbrow art or Marvel diarrhea, because the moment you do you engage with it. Bunch of geeks, I swear...
>>
No. 71937
I'm growing closer to my new D&D group, wich means in practice that three single girls are ok with listening to me rambling for hours.
>>
No. 71938 Kontra
>>71935
>When has art not been a commodity?

When it wasn't made to be sold for its exchange value.

I think the modernist avant-garde would be an example but maybe I'm heavily mistaken and their paintings were done by them to make a living as well. But again I never said it's not art just because people don't engage with it as people in different varieties engage with art.
>>
No. 71941 Kontra
6 kB, 364 × 295
Whenever I not sleep enough, I get hopeless.
Tomorrow I'll go to the habilitation presentation of the lecturer that asked me to be there.

I'm also gonna print some books I need to read for my conference presentation.
Everything feels fucked.
>>
No. 71946 Kontra
>>71941
>Whenever I not sleep enough, I get hopeless.

I have the same, sleeping just a few hours lets my mood collapse. When I drink coffee then, it gets exceedingly worse, just nervous, anti-social and anxiety-ridden. Sleep deprivation is a common factor in psychosis when it comes in combination with drugs that fuck with your dopamine levels btw.
>>
No. 71955
Lucky guys. One's mood can be consciously controlled at the very least. Whenever I'm seriously underslept, my concentration hits the bottom, with unfortunate consequences of various severity to be expected, and that is something extremely hard to deal with.
>>
No. 71965
33 kB, 520 × 416
After trying to figure out the origins of a stupid meme that started flooding my recommendations, I stumbled upon this Chinese opera: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NzBu5v-ISE
Ended up watching the whole thing in one sitting. Apparently it's also an abridged version and is missing 1 scene.
Very engrossing story. It's funny how the theme of bringing corrupt powerful people to justice shows up so often in Chinese culture.

I also like how the heroine of the story sought not compensation or a better life, rejecting such offers outright, but literal Heavenly capital J Justice, being more unwavering in this than even Justice Bao himself.
I think this detail really elevates the story, giving the audience catharsis not through a particular tragic woman's woes were lifted, but through the ideal of justice itself being carried through.

Now I want to watch more chinese operas and read up about all these interesting quirks like face paint, long sleeves, those tai-chi like movements, peculiar intonations, etc., and what they are supposed to convey, because I feel like I'm missing a lot of the intended meaning there.
>>
No. 71988 Kontra
I went to the habilitation presentation thingy, but I feel a bit dirty for having partaken in an academic ritual of this kind. I don't know why.
Saw a few elderly academics on the professional committee. It's strange because in the Far Eastern department you rarely see these "powerlich" type people. At least for now, it seems to be relatively young.

Anyway, I slept a lot, after coming home too, yet I still feel down and I hate everything.
Not much else to it.

Maybe tomorrow will be better. Hope the weather will be good.
>>
No. 71999 Kontra
272 kB, 1000 × 629
I registered for several one-time workshops on academic writing/structuring project and dissertation path. Time to get a bit more serious because now that I read into 2-4 topics of higher interest I see how vast these are and I struggle to find a way to really nail down questions/problems I could deal with for a span of several years, many things have been covered and I won't get anywhere with my broad questions for this. Surely I will have to deal with objects already written about but pursue other angles and nexuses in which the object/problem takes a place.

New glasses will arrive today, I hope everything is well and I finally can have a nice frame again with clear sight.
I don't know if I'm ill or just tired, need to do a test before I make a return home for easter.
>>
No. 72008
I had three interviews this week for the analyst position.
>government job
People seemed nice, I sense career potential, job seems related somewhat to governance/management related in a good way, meaning that you could eventually go to the ministry or something
> academia job
A usual thing for me, a bit boring, related to near space research and also earthquakes. No career potential cause it’s academia.
-financial/banking
Soulless corporation. They instantly started to dig into my experience/abilities/knowledge. 4 people did the interview simultaneously what the fuck. Every single one of them was disgusting in a sense of human qualities. But bank doesn’t need human employees apparently lizardmen are fine.
They didn’t even say the wage. The office is a skyscraper but they mentioned remote work so I guess it is 24-7 work.

I think I’m gonna pick the first option tbh.
>>
No. 72010
>>72008
You could do the financial sector stuff for a couple of years if you can negotiate a wage that makes it worth it. Then switch to a government job later on.
>>
No. 72016
>>72008
I hope a decade later you will remember good old Ernstchan and occasionally post how much in bribes you have squeezed and how many murders you've helped to cover up. :3
>>
No. 72019
>>72010
The problem is that i just know that i'm going to feel like i am in the wrong spot.
Yeah probably the pay is good and i would be able to afford a cool car like a mercedes c-class within one year. But i will pay for that with high stress levels and will have to force myself to work. And i know it's just not for me. I prefer a chill job. In russia it's either government or academia and i worked in academia for many years, time to switch to something else i guess.
>>72016
I once was invited to work for three letter agency, just saying and then decided not to for whatever reason.

>t. pizzaman.
>>
No. 72023
498 kB, 720 × 540
Spent the day in the garden reading about Chinese Legalism.
Classical Chinese studies are actually paying off, because I can look up phrases in the original and interpret them relatively easily.
I'm preparing for my conference presentation. I'm not really anxious about it. At best we will have like 5-10 people present, if even that. It'd be kind awkward if it was just the three of us who present watching each others' presentations.

Played some ATOM RPG. It was like 40% off steam and the 8 or so euros for it wasn't all that much so I just used some of my stipend money to buy it. I have like 3 hours in it, and so far I can't say I'm all that into it, but I do keep coming back to it day after day.
It's a hell of a lot harder than Fallout 1 or 2 ever was.

Not much else happened today. Yeah, I managed to align the shades perfectly this time, so there was no sun on the table.
Lemonade was probably bad for me. Or maybe it was the coffee. I want to throw up and I'm shaking a bit. Even after eating.
But the iron supplement is working, because I no longer feel as tired when I laid it off. (Because I was too forgetful and lazy to buy a bottle of iron pills.)

On the elderly front, nothing much changed. Maternal grandma is in the ICU, but at least she can now use the phone and doesn't have covid, and my paternal is just slowly declining. My father is doing his best to ignore the situation.

>>71965
Most Peking/Beijing opera pieces are incredibly long and afaik not meant to be watched in one sitting. Most people knew the stories so they just looked at the juicy bits when it was played at teahouses as they chatted.
Or when a rich guy organised an event at his home they only played the cool parts instead of the whole thing. Or a selection of scenes from multiple opera pieces.
>>
No. 72025
I borrowed a book from the library that I read about 3 years ago. It still had the post-it I left sticking outside the book back then. So I suspect nobody borrowed that book during the time passed.
>>
No. 72031
957 kB, 1527 × 829
>>72023
Well, with any live act, once you're familiar with it, you start to care about more, and appreciate the individual performances, rather than the "thing itself". People rarely give 100% attention to an entire music festival either, unless they're superfans or some shit.

I don't think it's anything particular to peking opera or opera in general, just the nature of live performances.

I do prefer the vocal performances to the acrobatic performances though.
>>
No. 72058
>>71965
When I was a kid I never liked the noisy, flamboyant traditional operas my grandparents watched on tv. But recently I found that I was able to appreciate their very unique tunes. Maybe there're some patterns with tonal language that one can only internalize after a long time training.
Every region has its own traditon of opera. Beijing isn't particularly special but gets most attention due to political interests. The supposed posh one is Kunqu but honestly I cannot tell much difference. Different facial makeups indicate different rôles. The stylistic moves and facial expressions are also very unique. I always imagine people from other cultures will cringe away from such peculiarities.
>>
No. 72059
>>72058
How are chinese operas perceived in China?
Compared to western operas that always have an air of snobism and high-brow bougie around them.
>>
No. 72062
>>72023
Wait, you're iron deficient? Are you a grille?
>>
No. 72067 Kontra
>>72062
No he isn't, and iron deficiency isn't particular to women.
>>
No. 72069
>>72067
>and iron deficiency isn't particular to women.
Cystitis isn't either, yet it's very rare for men to get it compared to women, just like iron deficiency.
Hungary, are you on some crazy medication that fucks with your iron resorption?
>>
No. 72070
>>72069
I find no mention that iron deficiency is more common in women than in man on either the english or german wikipedia pages.

Do you have any factual evidence for your claim or is this based on hear-say?
>>
No. 72075
>>72059
Basically seen as boomer entertainment. Unlike the west, chinese opera has been a common folk thing since at least 10th century, so there's never any sort of aura around them (with the exception of Kunqu). Younger generations (I'd say those under 60) grew up with a much wider choice of entertainments and therefore less exposure to it. Safe to say it's a dying tradition.
>>
No. 72076
24 kB, 1284 × 184
124 kB, 382 × 491
>>72070
>I find no mention that iron deficiency is more common in women than in man on either the english or german wikipedia pages.
Why are you lying?
Also, it's common knowledge (Allgemeinbildung), you know?
With how women having periods and such being the major factor...
Have a proofster rooster for your demand of "factual evidence" and maybe read a book about the human body or something.
>>
No. 72078 Kontra
>>72069
>>72070
>Hungary, are you on some crazy medication that fucks with your iron resorption?
I actually am taking some crazy shit that comes in an autoinjector every two weeks, but it's not because of that. I have Crohn's-disease and it's because of that that my iron levels are shit.
It's why I'm periodically so weak and sickly, feel cold or in pain.
>>
No. 72079
>>72078
Oh well that sucks. Dark chocolate has a high iron content, as does liver, if you like that. But you probably already know that. Best to your elders, and may they go in peace when it's time.
>>
No. 72084
>>72076
Wasn't trying to be a proofster or anything, I'm just incapable of reading it seems. The amazing thing is that I remember reading the sentence above and the paragraph about veganism below...

But thanks for answering despite my incompetence ._.

>Also, it's common knowledge (Allgemeinbildung), you know?

Never heard about it before today. The only person I knew (and of whom I knew) with iron deficiency was a former flat mate and he was ... well a "he".

If I may nitpick, though: There is a difference between "below recommended levels" and a "deficiency". How many of those 58% of women actually have a deficiency that requires treatment is not mentioned.

... so I guess to prove I'm not a complete dunce I'm now reading through the cited study.

>Nationale Verzehrsstudie II. 2008, S. XXIV und 135.

>Der Median der Eisenzufuhr liegt bei Männern bei 14,4 mg/Tag und bei Frauen bei 11,8 mg/Tag (Anhang Tab. A. 50).

Which paints a quite different picture when you factor in body weight differences between men and women.
Though I wonder why they only give the median and not also the mean and stddev.
Also, it seems to be the median per person over the testing period, not over the population.

>Der Median der Eisenzufuhr liegt bei den Männern in allen Altersgruppen über der
>empfohlenen Eisenzufuhr (Abb. 5.43 und Anhang Tab. A. 50). Für die Frauen gilt bis
>zum Alter von 50 Jahren mit 15 mg/Tag ein höherer Referenzwert als in den
>Altersgruppen darüber mit 10 mg/Tag.

So the median misses the recommendation by 3.2mg (~20% below); that is the comparison to the D-A-CH reference values.

Now the table (A50) in the appendix does have mean and percentiles. Sadly the study doesn't mention anything about the meaning of those values. Such as how far below the recommendation you can be before entering the danger zone.
Guess I'd have to do more research but my diner is ready in a few minutes...

I do wonder how this compares to populations of other countries, though.
>>
No. 72092
>>72084
I was a bit butthurt about the claim that it doesn't appear anywhere, so apologies for being so smug.
However, I could also cite anecdotal evidence of my ex and the ex of a friend having problems with iron deficiency, my mom giving unsolicited complaints about it, learning that stuff in medical training and basically every result you get when googling "Eisenmangel" being female-centric. Like you would search for hair loss and get mainly male-centric results, despite hair loss also occurring in females. Also remember that iron deficiency and anemia aren't the same.
But maybe it isn't as common a knowledge as I thought, like some people not knowing rice contains starch.
>>
No. 72093
There needs to be a new type of city map that transforms spatial coordinates into time-to-arrive-at-destination space.

My shithole districts is physically close to certain things, but the retarded city layout makes it inconvenient to reach places that are physically near my location. Plus, inconsistent public transport coverage.
It is annoying and unintuitive having to calculate travel time when given a map that specifies just the physical distance, which is completely irrelevant in an urban environment.

In fact, the notion of "space" as a dimension of distance makes no sense in a modern urban environment.
The way people experience places today is not as a continuous whole, but as a series of disconnected locations with [travel] in-between. You get on a cab / bus / your own car, and 30 mind numbing minutes of staring at your phone later, you arrive at a place. Then you go back. The space stops being a continuous whole, and you don't so much "go through space" (subjectively), as you very slowly teleport to another location. The teleportation device being the interior of a transportation device such as a car or a tram cart or a bus.

Teleportation is real, it's just way less cool than we imagined. Just like any other sci-fi idea that came true, I guess.
>>
No. 72102
>>72093
IIRC sinoids did something like that once upon a time, where their standard unit of distance was a function of effort rather than space. I too wish this had achieved dominance.
>>
No. 72106 Kontra
>>72079
>Oh well that sucks.
Well, it kinda does but it also doesn't.
When it comes around it's fucking awful, but usually a quick round of meds solves it for a year or two. I love those things. I can move heaven and earth with half a hand when I'm on them.
But when it's not around, I still have it on my record in some cases as a "permanent illness", so I can reap the benefits from it administratively.
Like during HS, I had those empty classes because this thing afforded me special administrative status. Though I wouldn't be happy if my kid inherited it.
I guess I just didn't win the genetic lottery on this one.

The elders are doing all right. Well, for the situation.
Maternal grandma is still in the ICU. My mother is in doubt about her getting over this. But she can talk and is conscious.
Paternal grandma is "stable" and who knows how long she will be around. Technically speaking, she should be dead right now according to statistics, but for some reason she sticks around (most people don't take too kindly to having their stomach taken out surgically). I guess no one told her.

I don't hate the elderly and I don't want to seem soulless, but the faster they go, the better it is for everyone. For one, they don't suffer as much, and for two, we can't care for them very effectively. (And to be frank, my mother doesn't really want to, either. She worked in elderly care before, and well, never again.)
For now it's not like this is a "crisis", the two affairs just progress in the background and something may happen at some point. We monitor them.
Kinda ironic that neither my father nor my father were the "favourites" in their families, yet they offer the most help to their mothers. The "favourite son" usually turns out to be a good-for-nothing dickhead. Which is bad, because I'm a "favourite son" too.
This passing of an older generation makes me think a lot about family. Not really meaningful thoughts, but I'm thinking about the nature of things.
>>
No. 72114
>>72106
It's certainly good to have some kind of "exit strategy". My mom has made an advance directive already years ago after my last grandma had died (well over a decade ago). My grandma had some kind of flour silicose or something and in the end they had to put her into an artificial coma. After that she was in ICU the whole time. I was still in uni at that time and we visited her every day. My mom was completely gone at that time and I was actually arguing for finally taking her off the machines because it was just dragging on and on. I had seen enough people going like that and I didn't want that to happen to my grandmother, or my parents or myself. My plan is to off myself as long as am still able to.
Anyway, after weeks and weeks she woke up and they put her out of ICU, but it was already nearing the end. At least we could talk to her again (or in my case for the last time and say goodbye).
I remember bringing clothes to my mom to the hospital on a saturday (she had been staying there with her mother) and during lunch at my then-gf's parents I got the call my grandma had died. We went to the hospital; seeing someone I know who was dead was certainly a different feeling. Next friday was the funeral.
>>
No. 72123
>>72106
>I don't hate the elderly and I don't want to seem soulless, but the faster they go, the better it is for everyone.

On the other hand, our generation would do well to inherit a bit more wisdom from their grandparents on how to live with scarcity and the hardships that come with economic decline or even temporary collapse (for some years after a war). So the longer the elderly stick around the greater the chance that some of us brats listen to one or two words of advice.
I know I would try to ask my grandma a lot nowadays if she was still alive.

>Though I wouldn't be happy if my kid inherited it.
>I guess I just didn't win the genetic lottery on this one.

In case you don't know this already: You can go to genetics institutes and get an evaluation for yourself and your partner before having kids. You'll learn about the chances are for various illneses to be inherited if you two mixed your genes.

t. worked at one of those while studying.
>>
No. 72131
Today i sleep in airport, before I go to accommodation tomorrow

I am paranoid to sleep, because there is another person not too far away (i think they're also a traveller), who keeps coughing. Would be extremely problematic if I get covid here (mostly came to visit old people). I did get a hold of some of the n95 masks though, so hopefully I got through the flight and tonight, without catching anything. Also suspicious of them, as it's nearly 3am, and she is still obviously awake.

I think it will be a bad sleep.
>>
No. 72136
>>72131
Good luck, man.
>>
No. 72140
I have survived the night. The kiwis did not rob me in my (short) sleep.

But I was woken by some big maori family meeting thing.
>>
No. 72144
Saturday night, again nothin going on on the Ernstchan.
I know you aren't normies, so what are you doing? Playing boardgames with your family and then going to bed early?

Anyway, for some reason I remembered how I once sent a chain letter to one of my grandmas. I don't even know how it reached me, I think some girl from my village thew it into our mailbox.
I know my grandma was superstitious, so she most likely also forwarded it.
It's something I still feel guilty about.
>>
No. 72146
114 kB, 973 × 579
>>72144
I wasted some time on TikTok the last hour, until 10pm I was rewriting and "polishing" a short essay that was due and that I wrote yesterday after reading the text we were told to comment on.
But yeah it is quite calm at the moment.

The plan now is to read a few pages further in the history book on medieval life of the common people. It promises to be quite interesting because it will be about the weather and nature (sea, forest, rain etc.)
>>
No. 72147
>>72146
>It promises to be quite interesting because it will be about the weather and nature (sea, forest, rain etc.)
Like what? Bauernregeln and such?
I only found out not too long ago that Bauernregeln are always regionally contextualized and in the area they were devised usually proved really precise, but obviously not if you try to apply them in general.
>>
No. 72148
Got the timetable for the conference. We're kinda fucked. Three sections will be parallel at all times, and the Oriental Studies one is parallel with the Philosophy and the Ancient and Medieval History sections.
And we're followed by the Biology and Chemistry sections, so we can't even hope to have someone stay a while as they wait for something they're actually interested in.

Working on the ppt. Openoffice keeps shitting itself so I'm gonna make good of that free office 365 licence the university gives me methinks.
Fucking hell. I HATE OFFICE SOFTWARE.

I keep reading about Legalism.
The criticism of my abstract said that the idea is good, because in Hungarian Sinology it's an under-researched topic.
It'd be funny to write my Master's in this too and become the "biggest expert on Chinese Legalism in Hungary". King of the trasheap, The half-eyed king among the blind and so on.

Did some grocery shopping with my mother. It was okay. Bought two journals. It's the same two journals I always buy. Vigilia, a catholic literary monthly dealing with literature and philosophy, and Eszmélet, a new-left journal about relatively current events and analysing them from a left-wing perspective. This issue has an article about Mark Fisher, an article on "Socialist Mixed-economies as an alternative" and "The relationship of State-socialism and neoliberalism".
Every time I buy a journal I think how it's a bit poseur-ish, but then again, how the fuck is a person supposed to buy a journal that's a genuine act?
The more I think about this, the more I feel like fish out of water at university. A lot of people seem to know how to walk the walk. I don't. It's horrible. Yet people think I know.

>>72114
My mother usually just says "If I ever get this bad (as in senile, or otherwise unberable to her old age) just beat me to death".
Otherwise I don't think anyone in Hungary is actually considerate or thinks much about their death. The elderly here think that they live forever and some of the bastards actually think they ought to live forever and have no shame about making everyone around them miserable as they try to achieve this goal.

Though Grandma from the hospital said that "I got myself into this alone, so if I die, this is on me.", which calmed my mother down quiet a bit.

>>72123
Well, the thing is, I think you could learn a thing or two about "life" and saving shit from the elderly. But that's the WW2 generation. My grandparents at best were a few year old at the time, and afterwards grew to become labourers in the era of Goulash communism, so I doubt they knew any "tricks" or much about nature.
My great grandmother did.
What I'm trying to say is that there's very little to be learned from sovok boomers in most cases.

I know about getting checked out for that, but I also forgot to add that while I'd prefer my kid not to inherit it, I'm not going to NOT have a kid because of it.
>>
No. 72149
>>72144
>so what are you doing?
Reading comic books. Just finished Something is Killing The Children. Well, it's ongoing, so I finished all of the published issues. 8/10. Great dialogue, decent story, but goes deeper into the lore than is necessary.
>>
No. 72151 Kontra
2,9 MB, 4032 × 1960
6,0 MB, 4032 × 1960
2,8 MB, 4032 × 1960
5,5 MB, 4032 × 1960
1) the people I am staying with weren't home when I arrived, so i went for a walk around the local area. I found this beach, off a path.
2) old bunker watching beach
3) beach from ground level
4) bird friends
>>
No. 72152
118 kB, 750 × 651
>>72144
I'm working, so I have to get a few weeks ahead of myself so I can have time off down the line. Fortunately the work I do is best done while I'm drinking so I'm also drinking.

After my work is done around 3am I will play world of tanks and then watch youtube videos or listen to music
>>
No. 72160
3,6 MB, 4032 × 3024
I just saw a Tesla Taxi.
I dunno what is it about the electric cars but seeing them in this environment is a bit surreal.
>>
No. 72161
just realized that people with with hearing only in one ear can still roughly tell the direction of incoming sounds by how much their own head attenuates the signal

damn
>>
No. 72162
200 kB, 1280 × 1062
Happy Easter, ernst.

t.Gregorian observer
>>
No. 72165 Kontra
>>72152
Whenever I see this picture I get the urge to form a phalanx with the boys. Just imagine how glorious it would be.
>>
No. 72168 Kontra
>>72165
Imagine the smell.
>>
No. 72170
322 kB, 700 × 384, 0:03
>>72168
Smells like victory and brotherhood my man
>>
No. 72175
Today I planted the seeds we bought last year.
Planted some cucumbers, sunflowers, thyme, marigold and lobelias.
Marigold is such a cool flower. It has a very strong smell, but what I like the most about it is the way it disperses its seeds. I loved it as a kid. Nowadays I don't see marigold anywhere. Maybe it just went out of fashion.

Almost done with the preparation for my presentation, so I think tomorrow I'll redirect my efforts onto the Modern Chinese Drama essay I have to write. Fuck. 10 pages. I wonder if I can pull it off. I guess I'll just play a bit with the formatting.
Next semester I'm going to pick a fucking classical topic for my research seminar at the workshop. It's actually remarkable how little of a fuck I give about modern mandarin for some reason.
Anyway, I'm astonished at Legalist philosophy and I made the right choice to write my thesis on this thing.

It kinda feels like I'm beginning to lose it again.

Started talking with the friend who I got into an argument with and didn't talk for months.
He's in despair over the elections. Can't really comfort him but I did listen to his woes before getting into an argument over Ukraine.
Basically what we settled on is that the sooner I stop saying I'm a communist, the sooner he can just say I'm a Spenglerite (which in his words equal to being mentally challenged) and be done with it instead of arguing. Then he sent some shitty meme about being depressed and we left it at that.

Easter celebrations were uneventful. We visited grandma, brought her lunch so she doesn't have to cook and then at home we had lunch.
I got 10k HUF and two scratch tickets, neither of which won.
Dad's off to a business trip again, so he didn't celebrate with us.
>>
No. 72176 Kontra
>>72175
*Last week
Don't know why I typed last year.
>>
No. 72200
I have a food poisoning, pretty sure. Had to throw up at east 7 times since this morning. What should I do? Even liquids won't stay inside.
>>
No. 72208
>>72200
What did you eat? If you are getting dehydrated you should seriously consider calling an ambulance.
You could also try the official WHO ghetto rehydration solution, maybe that will stay inside better.
https://rehydrate.org/solutions/homemade.htm
>>
No. 72211 Kontra
>>72200
Drink Gatorade. I hope you die.
>>
No. 72215
>>72208
It stopped eventually and tea stays inside. Also a few breadcrumbs did. I should eat bit more, headache is rather annoying but not terrible anymore.
>>
No. 72228 Kontra
101 kB, 967 × 542
Due to a recent development I have literally wasted over two years of my life. Completely wasted. I'm not going to elaborate on this since it would be easy to doxx me. Holy shit it hits hard, two years just down the drain in every way imaginable.

It feels very much like this is some unbelievable punishment from the Gods that should never happen to anyone. But then again it's very much a normal part of life. People get fucked by all sorts of reasons all the time. I should be thankful to be alive, at least I still have the freedom to kill myself. Probably skip on that for now though. Mentally a very odd state to be in. Hopefully it will pass before life decides to fuck me again.
>>
No. 72229
>>72228
Can you at least give a general direction?
Doing research and realizing your working hypothesis is absolute fucking shit?
Relationship?
Giving your all for your company (incl. moving) because they said you would get promoted just to get fired?
>>
No. 72230 Kontra
>>72228
Don't make big unrealistic plans for life. You never know when the fate might bite you in the ass and destroy everything.

t. pizzaman
>>
No. 72231 Kontra
65 kB, 550 × 388
>>72229
Something to do with work and money is of course in play here. Just all efforts or proceedings deleted and everything amounting to only waste. A worse situation than anything you described.

Two years gone from the hourglass and I'm in a worse situation than what I started in. Macabre.
>>
No. 72232
>>72231
Shitsux. Keep going, it needs to get worse before it gets better.
>>
No. 72234 Kontra
>>72232
Cheers.

"It's no use to cry at the marketplace"
t. A very original Finnish proverb
>>
No. 72235
39 kB, 1280 × 720
>>72228
>2 years
Lul. Me approaching a decade. You'll be right.
>>
No. 72245
>>72228
With time, it improves.

I flipped a coin back when I was at uni whether to put my savings in BTC, back when it was 300 per. It came up to say keep out of it. One can look with regret upon past mistakes, but at the end of the day, nothing can be changed. A long list of regrets follow everyone. Unless of course, you're the son of an oligarch or something like that.

Obviously none of this makes your situation easier now though, but time heals most things.
>>
No. 72250
>>72175
>Today I planted the seeds we bought last year.
>Planted some cucumbers, sunflowers, thyme, marigold and lobelias.

Oh, thanks for reminding me! Any time now the nightly frost should stop and I should start planting stuff.

>>72231
Good luck with whatever you try next.
In my experience it helps to let the thoughts develop for a short while after a dramatic event, maybe a week, maybe a month; and then talk with someone about how the situation feels. Someone that is easy to talk to and not going to judge you much. If you don't have someone like that there is no shame to visit a therapist for a few sessions. Just to get your mind sorted out, it's about finding a way to wrap up this chapter of your life so that it doesn't drag you down for years.
>>
No. 72257 Kontra
>>72255
>Taz published an article by an author who describes living in Brandenburg without a car for roughly two years. Trivial summary: She and her partner used E-Bikes.
This is pretty much worthless without knowing what routes they had to take. Was it a 20 minute e-bike drive over flat land? Was the local place to get groceries close enough?
And especially that last comment is very true.
If you want people to drive less, give them an incentive to do so. I grew up among hills. Apart from e-bikes not really existing back then, public transport was (and still is) a catastrophe, so it was necessary to get a car right away. People drive 20km to and from work, at the very least. Even on flat ground that takes more than half an hour by bike. What about people who have to commute 50+ km?
I also recently saw a documentary about commuters around Berlin, which also had a couple living in Brandenburg. They spent like two hours each morning and evening just commuting, changing trains and all that. FOUR HOURS PER DAY JUST FOR COMMUTING.
Don't get me wrong, after I have moved and won't have those long commuting distances like I have now (100km), I will definitely drive as little as possible. Bike is out of the picture because of a condition I have, but maybe I can even try and go by foot.

But what articles like this showcase extremely well is that the only people who have no problem with banning something are those not affected by the ban.
I don't smoke so I wouldn't care about banning cigarettes, but you go ahead and try that and see the outcry. The other way round it's with legalization of weed. I don't smoke weed either, so I couldn't care less if it's legalized or not, yet the very same "save the planet" people have been figuratively and literally seething for years and decades now. And smoking weed does affect young brains, as does the modern internet. Maybe we should ban smartphones for children under 18 then?

Pulled from war thread because it really doesn't belong there.
>>
No. 72259
Apparently green, sour apples aren't universally liked. There are actually people out there who prefer the mushy, sweet kind.

Gonna have to adjust my model of reality.
>>
No. 72260
>>72259
My gf likes the green sour apples most.
I don't like apples.
>>
No. 72263
>>72260
>here's a platonic ideal of a fruit, a round mass consisting of plant fiber, water and fructose
>"noooo I don't like that"
Wow, we've got ourself a snowflake here.
What other physical manifestations of higher order concepts you don't like? Circles? Numerical digits? Gravity?

Let me guess, your favorite fruit is the pomegranate. All complex, layered, fancy and sophisticated, but also annoying to deal with and full of mostly chaff.
Just like you.
>>
No. 72265
>>72263
Apples are not round, through.
The reason why I don't like apples is that they are unsatisfying to eat. I eat one and don't feel any more satisfied, full or refreshed than before, unlike with cherries, strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, redcurrant and whatever else I can pick from bushes and non-apple trees along my way. Apples are nice to chew on when I happen to pass an apple tree somewhere, but that's it.
Man I miss the cherry tree in my parents' garden, and the redcurrant bushes and we even had a peach tree. Gone, all of it.
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No. 72266 Kontra
>>72250
Yeah, still haven't completely come to terms with what happened. Talking about it seems like a good idea as it feels very tormenting, making sleep impossible. Thanks for the support, Ernst(s).

>>72259
Apples were ruined by selective cultivation aiming for beauty, not taste.

Here's a short video about it:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mgZNDTJSvJQ
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No. 72268
>>72259
I like "Granny Smith" apples. Do you know that all "Granny Smith" trees are clones of one tree?
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No. 72270
>>72268
>Do you know that all "Granny Smith" trees are clones of one tree?

I didn't, but I do know that in the London botanical gardens there is a clone of the apple tree that Newton sat under. Even though the story of the apple falling on his head is bogus, there was indeed an apple tree that he liked to sit under. And one of its clones can be found in the botanical garden in London. And because the british are very british it is forbidden to take apples from that tree that haven't fallen to the ground by themselves.
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No. 72277
>>72257
>This is pretty much worthless without knowing what routes they had to take.
>Was it a 20 minute e-bike drive over flat land? Was the local place to get groceries close enough?
I checked if I paraphrased correctly. I did.
The author told of her experience living in a home in the literal woods of Brandenburg without a car.
Here is a link, as far as I can tell taz is down, otherwise I would have posted it earlier.
https://web.archive.org/web/20220418072505/https://taz.de/Leben-ohne-Auto/!5846129/
How is it different when her one-way-trip to the shop was 15km instead of 10km? It is not like it would have any implications for you or anyone else. She having a grocery store next door won't move another one further away from you or the other way round.

>If you want people to drive less, give them an incentive to do so.
The article did not argue one way or the other.
My personal opinion: I do not think that the government can or should try to guarantee that long commutes or even personal car ownership remain viable under all circumstances. History has shown that government can and will not guarantee that you are fed under all circumstances, for that matter.
>I grew up among hills. Apart from e-bikes not really existing back then, public transport was (and still is) a catastrophe, so it was necessary to get a car right away
Is a lack of public transport a natural precondition that can not be changed, or is it the result of political decisions and economical developments?
There used to be many rural branch lines narrow-gauge railways which were shut down during the 1950s-1990s, when passenger numbers declined as people switched to the car. Then the car became a necessity.
>People drive 20km to and from work, at the very least.
The way most people live is enabled by the car. But car dependency is a vicious circle. Cars and their parking lots take up huge amounts of space. What makes shopping without a car difficult is that all the shops are build way out in commercial zoning and are surrounded by parking lots twice the size of the shop. It is not cities that are loud and dangerous, it is mostly cars that are loud and dangerous. The noise we associate with cities is mostly the noise of car-traffic. The dangers we associate with traffic are the dangers of car-traffic. And the noise and danger is what drives people, people with children in particular, out of cities, so they need to drive their cars more. Parking lots also need more

>Even on flat ground that takes more than half an hour by bike. What about people who have to commute 50+ km?
>have to
I only partially buy the "have to" part. I know that the employment office is in the habit of demanding insane commutes from welfare recipients, even for part-time-work, to the point where it becomes economically senseless to even work, but will refuse to up-front the cost for a move. This is stupid, can't put it any other way. Other than that, long commutes are mostly a personal choice. Most people choose their own jobs and accommodation, after all.

>They spent like two hours each morning and evening just commuting, changing trains and all that. FOUR HOURS PER DAY JUST FOR COMMUTING.
So what should be done about it? Build more highways, so their commute can be shortened? That would only generate more traffic and noise and ruin more neighborhoods so more people would decide to live further out.

>Don't get me wrong, after I have moved and won't have those long commuting distances like I have now (100km), I will definitely drive as little as possible. Bike is out of the picture because of a condition I have, but maybe I can even try and go by foot.
Good luck on that.

>But what articles like this showcase extremely well is that the only people who have no problem with banning something are those not affected by the ban.
The article did not argue for banning anything. The author described her experiences. She writes that driving cars ruins the planet, which it does, but I suspect that this is what angered some people. They probably were not angered by her telling them that starting in October, she needed two pairs of gloves because her fingers got cold.

>I don't smoke so I wouldn't care about banning cigarettes, but you go ahead and try that and see the outcry. The other way round it's with legalization of weed. I don't smoke weed either,
Neither do I, or at least not in the past 12 years.

>so I couldn't care less if it's legalized or not,
The line of argument is flawed. Obviously, not everything someone thinks convenient for personal reasons should be legal. A murderer might argue that murder should be legal, at least in his particular situation. Would that make him right?

>yet the very same "save the planet" people
Do you think the planet is not in need of saving or the planet is not worth saving? What is it the "save the planet people" have wrong?

>people have been figuratively and literally seething for years and decades now. And smoking weed does affect young brains, as does the modern internet. Maybe we should ban smartphones for children under 18 then?
Arguments that can be made. But what off it?

My point was that
people love driving. And they get very angry when someone questions driving. And heating. Any increase in cost of energy comes at an immense political cost.
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No. 72285
>>72277
Oh god what a trite slog. Is there a school where those people learn how to write in the most annoying way possible?
But it is as I suspected: They really don't actually need the car. She even says both have home office compatible jobs. And the electricity just comes from the plug, so it's all good, isn't it?
The main problem of public transport being neglected is only mentioned en passant. How the author FEELS and how her boyfriend has no driver's licence is more important. And it's telling that she accepts her parents SUV right away because she knows that hauling shit around with a bike has its limits.

So the first point, which this article doesn't really talk about is how shitty public transport outside of cities is. And I am absolutely convinced that the government SHOULD improve public transport if they want people to drive less.

>It is not cities that are loud and dangerous, it is mostly cars that are loud and dangerous. The noise we associate with cities is mostly the noise of car-traffic. The dangers we associate with traffic are the dangers of car-traffic.
Cars driven by city people? So yeah, it is cities and frankly I don't understand people who live and work in the city and still have a car. I would ditch mine the instant I could. If they don't want commuters to drive into the city, why not create more park and ride places outside the city? You drive to the city, not inside, and then use the public transport.

>Other than that, long commutes are mostly a personal choice. Most people choose their own jobs and accommodation, after all.
Yeah, if you're an unbound single maybe. But you can't always choose everything and have to make compromises.
The way you are talking strikes me as you being someone who is extremely privileged mobility-wise.
And not everyone is ready to move to the other side of the country just for a job. You talk about people preferring long commutes, but you're ok with them moving around all the time? Not everyone likes being a nomad. I have moved five times since 2015 and I hate it and I really don't want to anymore. I want to stay in one place for at least five years for change, without having to follow jobs - because not everyone can find work everywhere, too.
So no, long commutes are not mostly a personal choice and most people choose the accomodation that goes with the job or the job that goes with the accomodation, not both at the same time. You have to be lucky for that.
Being able to that is a luxury, a big one.
Of course the underlying problem is tolerating that kind of practice and how commutes of an hour are still deemed "annehmbar".
But if there was some kind of law that prohibited commutes of more than 30 minutes, what happens if you take a new job? Leave your family and get a flat close to your job so that during the week you only live for your job and only go home on weekends? Lots of people already do that and it's not a nice existence.

>So what should be done about it? Build more highways, so their commute can be shortened?
No, certainly not. I meant to illustrate just how insane commuting can get. And those people didn't choose to do that. Do you think the author of that article would have been able to keep up the bike lifestyle if she weren't able to work from home?

>The article did not argue for banning anything.
No, but it argued in favor of e.g. speed limits on the Autobahn, which is fucking retarded, as those who want to save gas already do (like me) and the handful speeders left vanish in the background noise. Making combustion engines unsustainable for normal people amounts to banning them. But if you don't need a car, why would you care? It's that kind of attitude, not what is getting to be banned/legalized specifically. If they want people to drive electric, why don't they have something like an exchange? Turn in your Diesel and get an Electro for at least 50% off, or make a 1:1 exchange.

>Do you think the planet is not in need of saving or the planet is not worth saving? What is it the "save the planet people" have wrong?
That was not the point. The point what that these people are hypocrites. Floriansprinzip, wasch mich aber mach mich nicht nass, etc.
People like Gottfried are consequent and I can respect someone like that.

And last, I can only speak for myself, I don't like driving in traffic and if I didn't need a car, I wouldn't have one. Hell, some years ago I had plans of selling mine until I realized I still do need it. And go ahead and tell my mom to heat less, see how that goes.
Obviously we all wouldn't have these problems if since Schröder our politicians didn't constantly choose to make us more and more dependant on Russia and simultaneously completely fuck up energy politics especially in the renewables field.