/int/ – No shittings during wörktime
„There is no place like home“

Currently at Radio Ernstiwan:


Hail Odin! by Christenklatscher666

M3U - XSPF


Unspecified description by no name

M3U - XSPF


File (max. 4)
Return to
(optional)
  • Allowed file extensions (max. size 25 MB or specified)
    Images:  BMP, GIF, JPG, PNG, PSD   Videos:  FLV, MP4, WEBM  
    Archives:  7Z, RAR, ZIP   Audio:  FLAC, MP3, OGG, OPUS  
    Documents:  DJVU (50 MB), EPUB, MOBI, PDF (50 MB)  
  • Please read the Rules before posting.
  • Make sure you are familiar with the Guide to Anonymous Posting.

No. 79118
116 kB, 1077 × 780
Ernst, let's have a thread about the small things that happen or that you do that you still feel like sharing.
Small-scale celebration of the seemingly insignificant is the name of the game here.

Penis joges allowed but looked down upon EC style

I'll start just to give an example:

When I empty a glass of jam there usually is this feeling of not wanting to waste the scraps that I can't get out with a spoon. A small annoyance, certainly.
But I keep those around for a day or two until the next time I make myself a Müsli, then I pour milk in the mostly-empty glass of jam, shake it wildly and pour the sweetened concoction over my Müsli instead of just fresh milk.

A small annoyance turned into a small joy. I bet I have a smug grin while doing it, too, but I've never done it infront of a mirror.
>>
No. 79129
36 kB, 600 × 900
Ok, I won a pair of picrelated as a small child and I was even in the local newspaper. I was so young that I have no memory about any of it or if they still exist.
>>
No. 79130
When I eat oranges, I keep a little bit of the skin, and eat it together with the flesh.
A small bite of the peel + an orange slice.

I find it adds a little bit of tang and bitterness to the taste, which I enjoy more than the pure sweetness of regular orange flesh.
>>
No. 79134
>>79118
My mother does something similar with Nutella. She uses the empty glass as coffee mug and gets a chocolate-y coffee.
>>
No. 79137
23 kB, 550 × 367
I've been wondering what's more efficient: When I boil water for tea, I can either wait for the tap water to become warm before pouring it into the water boiler, or I can put the cold water into it. As far as I know the tap water here is heated with oil, while the water boiler obviously operates with electricity. So I wonder what's better: Have the tap water running for a few moments until it gets warm, or just heating the cold water with electricity. I can make uneducated arguments for both: The tap water isn't heated, there's obviously a permanent reservoir of hot water available, so this should be a device that is very efficient in making hot water. And a cup of water doesn't make a difference, and the little bit of water running through the drain before it gets warm is irrelevant. On the other hand: Electricity to heat is almost 100% conversion rate, so it's obviously the better choice, right. But then: The electricity has been generated using fossil fuels, nuclear energy and the likes, with shitty conversion rates. So I tend to believe that starting out with warm tap water is the better solution, even if it takes a few moments. I wonder if it was possible to create a formula for the break even point with how long the water has to run before it gets warm for the warm tap water alternative to become less efficient than the water boiler.

Of course I know that none of this will save notable amounts of energy, the question just picked my interest.
>>
No. 79138
>>79137
I use the hot water start simply because I get my tea quicker that way.
Also, it depends on what kind of water heater you have.
If you actually have a warm water pipe then yeah, it will probably not be heated by electricity.
However, if you have a Niederdruckarmatur and only a cold water tap, then the water boiler runs on electricity too and will certainly also have a reservoir of hot water.
>>
No. 79144 Kontra
10 kB, 480 × 360
>>79137
>>79138
Are you sure using hot tap water is safe? From what I've read it may contain bacteria like Legionella and trace metals from the pipes in much greater amounts than with cold water. Sure bacteria isn't really an issue if you're boiling the water, but I find it a good practice not to use hot water for cooking or consumption in any form. Easier to avoid accidentally drinking it without boiling or prevent ingesting excess metals.

Might not be the case if you have a hot water boiler/tank in your home, though I'd suspect it would still carry more trace materials from your building's pipes into your cup than cold water would.
>>
No. 79146
>>79144
I don't know about Spedeland, but in Germany tap water is far safer than bottled even.
>>
No. 79147 Kontra
>>79146
This is true in Finland, in regards of cold water. If any hot water gets delivered from utility to a building in Germany, I'm pretty sure you will have the same problems as I've mentioned. You just might not be aware of them.
>>
No. 79148
58 kB, 1000 × 752
>>79147
As mentioned in an earlier post, there are different ways of getting the heated water.
In the case of a device like pic related that you have under your sink, you only have a cold-water pipe anyway; the reservoir is filled and then heated inside of the device, so all dirt and germs that could ever get into my pot from warm water come from the actual conduits of the tap.
That said, the water that comes out of the tap in my apartment is almost boiling, so I don't think germs have much of a chance there.
>>
No. 79150 Kontra
21 kB, 512 × 441
>>79148
>That said, the water that comes out of the tap in my apartment is almost boiling, so I don't think germs have much of a chance there.
Yes, in any case - the Germs will drink the water.
>>
No. 79151 Kontra
>>79148
See
>>79144
>Might not be the case if you have a hot water boiler/tank in your home
>>
No. 79153
>>79151
>Might not be the case if you have a hot water boiler/tank in your home
Yeah well, but this is just one possibility; other people have a central heater in the basement, so the distance traveled through the house's installations - which might be older than those under my sink - is bigger, so a boiler in my home is not necessarily a boiler in my home.
>>
No. 79154 Kontra
50 kB, 670 × 376
>>79153
>so a boiler in my home is not necessarily a boiler in my home
I love interacting with Germans online.
>>
No. 79155
>>79154
Silly Finn, this is not a cat, it's a capybara. It's not even in the same Order!
>>
No. 79156
>>79134
Smart! I don't eat Nutella, but I think I'm curious/brave/dumb enough to try this with peanut butter... will report back :D
>>
No. 79157
25 kB, 244 × 181
>>79156
You now imagine a peanut butter nutella coffee.
>>
No. 79158
>>79157
Bonus points if it's "crunchy" peanut butter.
>>
No. 79163
88 kB, 1080 × 1296
Approaching red lights that turn green just in time for you. Now that's some good shit.
>>
No. 79575
I enjoy putting peanut butter on peanut butter flavored snacks. Peanut butter and cheese crackers, peanut butter granola bars, peanut butter wafer cookies- these are all better with a layer of fresh from the jar creamy peanut butter spread on top.

>>79156
I tried peanut butter powder in coffee once, but it wasn't as good as I had hoped. Probably needed chocolate to balance the flavor.
>>
No. 79657
up
>>
No. 79701
It's still a nope