/int/ – No shittings during wörktime
„There is no place like home“

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No. 81773
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How is the life in the countryside in Europe?
i have been in different imageboards, like Krautchan, Kohlchan, Ylilauta and 4chan /int/ in his early days, but i have almost never seen a thread made by a western european about life as a farmer or in the countryside at least.
Do these people have special benefits from their goverments for pursuing such a life style there? or they are impoverished as for example farmers in the Americas?
Here life in the farm is mostly for people who are either too ignorant to have a job in the city, or people with lot of money who work in the farm just for fun. My family falls in the second category, thought when my parents were young they definitely were in the first.
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No. 81782
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>>81773
Europe is a very diverse place. The empty mid-section of France is hardly comparable to the Netherlands. I can only speak for my part.

Countryside as you likely imagine it does not exist in South-West Germany. Population density is high at 300 inhabitants/km². all of the country is well developed, decades of spatial planning according to the theories and guidelines of Walter Christaller had the intended results, almost no one lives more than 45 minutes from a central place of the highest order (regional center). Even people who live in the countryside mostly do not work in farming.

>i have almost never seen a thread made by a western european about life as a farmer
your chances of finding a farmer on an image board are very small, a low single digit percentage of the population works in farming, and they are mostly not the types to lurk on image boards. I can try to answer some questions, but in general, it is all very unsurprising.
>Do these people have special benefits from their goverments for pursuing such a life style there?
EU agriculture is heavily subsidized. This rigs the game in favor of big farmers. Applying for subsidies is basically a considerable fixed effort, but the monetary results scale with the size of the operation. This makes things much better for big farms in northern Germany and East Germany.
>or they are impoverished as for example farmers in the Americas?
Farming is very capital intensive and margins are tight. Farmers often try to stay competitive by making big investments (machinery like milking robots, etc.) and when prices fall, or the equipment does not work as intended, it will cost them dearly. For example, I used to know dairy farmers who had a neighbor design a stable that had a bad layout and made cows step on each other's udder. They could only use it for bulls, and I am certain they lost a lot of revenue from that.

Structural shifts that began in the fifties and sixties are ongoing. In my state, the number of farms has decreased, operation size has increased. Valleys that in the eighties had 4 or 5 mixed farms with 5-30 milk cows, a few pigs a few chickens, etc now have no farm at all. Specialisation has increased. Many switched to stabling riding horses, which is lucrative if not too far from the next big city or wealthy suburb and makes the wives, daughters and nieces happy, since everything is in place to keep one or two horses of their own. There definitely are more farmers who struggle to make ends meet than there are well-to-do farmers, but they are certainly not dirt-poor by the standards of south america.
Average acreage per farm in Baden-Wurttemberg has increased from 7 ha to almost 40 ha in the past 50 years, while the number of farming operations is now only 1/10 of what it was. https://www.statistik-bw.de/Landwirtschaft/Agrarstruktur/Betriebe-LFGK.jsp
This is still very small by international and national comparison. It is a result of partible inheritance, were all children inherited land in equal parts and each field was individually split between all the children. Intensive specialized cultures like vineyards, asparagus, hops, fruit, etc. mostly have very small acreage and lower the average.
From the mid 19th century onwards, many farms were operated part-time by factory-workers or tradesmen. With increasing mechanisation during the post-war period, the small farms with their numerous very small fields became more problematic, as they could not be worked with machines economically. Farmsteads often were located in tight historical village centers, which were hard to get through with big farming equipment and left little space for newly built garages. Government subsidies allowed farmers to build new farmhouses outside the villages (Aussiedlerhof, typical form pictured, state in 1970), a land-reform redistributed fields among the farmers to consolidated small fields into bigger fields. (Flurbereinigung, map from Ravensburg county).

Personal economic circumstances of farmers today vary with the success of the operation. Gentleman-farming were wealthy people operate just as a hobby does not exist, but part-time farming still does.

>Here life in the farm is mostly for people who are either too ignorant to have a job in the city
Most farmers have either been to trade school or university for farming-related subjects, many are trained in a mechanics-related field like farming-equipment maintenance, industrial mechanics, etc. Practically all of them could find another job elsewhere.
>Job in the city
is not really that much of a thing, since the economic geography is not as centralized as in most of the world. There are world-known companies in the middle of nowhere. I know it's a cliché, but one based in fact. Kärcher (the one with the pressure washers) has their biggest plant in Bühlertal, which is rural by our standards, but again, just 1 hour from Stuttgart.

>My family falls in the second category, thought when my parents were young they definitely were in the first.
Congratulations.
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No. 81788
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Here you go, Genuine German Countryside™
The sign roughly says "please no pooping on these fields, we're growing food for humans here"
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No. 81791
>>81788
> SL273277.JPG
I'm staring at a broken door,
There's nothing left here eehohooooooo...
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No. 81792
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No. 81793
>>81792
Eehohoo is what a horse says. If Tokio Hotel singer was a horse, she would sing "Monsoon" like that.
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No. 81796
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For every hundred Finns, there's about 0,95 farms. But in a hundred people there are only 2,6 farmers. So most of the farms are very small and operate as members of cooperatives. Finnish farmers exist in a financial superposition where they simultaneously need more and more subsidies because operations are not financially feasible as well as boast and show off their insane profits.

No insights into the farmer lifestyle, though life in rural Finland is quite isolated.
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No. 81797
>>81793
Ah. The problem with references is that both sender and receiver (in this case you and me) need to know what is referenced. I have no clue about TH songs.

If it's any consolation, I've been the sender before and got a lot of "?" for things I said.
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No. 81801
>How is the life in the countryside in Europe?

Boring, expensive and villagers are universally twats.

The future is quite depressing to think about as only old people live in the countryside these days which means a slow death of communities as the schools close and ultimately no school = no new families. There's this idea popular in Scotland that immigration might reverse the trend, if for no other reason than there's plenty of lowly-paid jobs, but obviously even the refugees complain about living in the remote parts of Scotland and certainly won't ever leave the Central Belt if there's any choice.

>i have been in different imageboards, like Krautchan, Kohlchan, Ylilauta and 4chan /int/ in his early days, but i have almost never seen a thread made by a western european about life as a farmer or in the countryside at least.

The average age for a farmer in Britain is 59.

>Do these people have special benefits from their goverments for pursuing such a life style there? or they are impoverished as for example farmers in the Americas?

Like for the German we're still living with the impacts of the common agricultural policy where benefits scale with large farm plots and farmers are encouraged to leave a certain amount of land uncultivated. Farms generally don't turn a profit even with the subsidies and a lot of the land is owned by rich landowners who don't work the land but will have landless tenant farmers (about 30% of the farmer pop) or experts run them.

If you wanted a closer look at things then Clarkson's Farm was pretty good series on it even if it's audience is petrolheads in the city.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6zO8BA2UQUs
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No. 81933
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>>81782
>>81801
>>81796

I find interesting that not even Europeans with their high standards of life consider moving to the countryside. Here is pretty much the same as you it seems, the goverment doesnt encourage enough people to move to the more rural areas despite the ridiculous prices of creating housing for new families in the city.
You would think giving money to some people to harvest some food would be much cheaper than paying hundreds of thousands of euros/pounds to expropiate land and build houses for a couple of families in already overpopulated towns.
I will take a look at the Clarkson's Farm. Thank you

>>81788

that looks cute and pretty much the same as chilean countryside in the center, except no one would even bother putting signs for anything
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No. 81934
>>81933
>not even Europeans with their high standards of life consider moving to the countryside
I live and work in the city but don't use, for example, the cultural and social benefits of city life. So I imagine that if I were to move to the countryside, I wouldn't feel any lonelier or more bored than here. But I don't have a car and probably wouldn't find a job I'd like if I moved.

Thanks for the photos. On maps, Chile looks so narrow between the coast and the Andes. It's interesting to see what an arable part of that land looks like up close.
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No. 81936
>>81933
This might sound more than a little incel, but observing my married acquaintances closely, I concluded the following: A young engineer/lawyer/doctor can find employment in a rural small town without problems, and he will have the advantage of much lower real estate prices, which over a working live might amount to additional ten years of net income, and that's comparing a spacious single family home to a shoebox in an A-grade city. The problem is the wife, who will feel like a loser telling her schoolfriends that she lives in Verl/Hof/Tuttlingen instead of Hamburg/Munich/Cologne, and thus won't have it. It's not like they ever visit the opera, it just makes them feel less important to live were there is no opera. A status-symbol, really, meaningless, useless and costly.

>>81933
>except no one would even bother putting signs for anything
That's likely because there aren't enough people who let there dogs shit in the fields.
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No. 81938
>>81933
>consider moving to the countryside
Internet is even shittier, hardly any doctors, no shops... and that's from the perspective of a small town (~15000). REAL countryside I can't even imagine.
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No. 81941
>>81938
>Internet is even shittier
>even shittier
If the local mayor uses his possibilities, he can have the infrastructure built and have the state/federal government pay for 90% of the cost, then lease it to a provider for twelve years. If some boomer-yokel is elected based on personal favors, then this won't work.

>hardly any doctors, no shops...
Only two furniture stores in a 5 mile radius instead of six, woe to you.
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No. 81946
>>81938
>hardly any doctors
That would only apply to real backwater countryside I think. In a 15k village from my experience there are still general doctors, and the availability of specialized doctors is influenced less by their existence, but by the type of ones health insurance. Of course you might have to take a longer trip to visit them, but that is the lesser problem compared to them telling you that their next open timeslot is in 9 months - of course only after asking about your health insurance provider.

>>81941
>Only two furniture stores in a 5 mile radius instead of six, woe to you.
I don't get the appeal of city life anyway. It's noisy, crowded and expensive, and, depending on the city, maybe dirty, and in worst case even unsafe. I agree fast internet is nice and I would like to have it, but I also enjoy looking out of the window and seeing lots of green, and the only noises in the night are cats duking out their hunting grounds.

>>81936
Status symbols are serious business. I saw a young family who isn't rich buying a 2000€ kid trolley, because ONLY THE BEST FOR THE BABY!!1 My first car cost 1400€, just for comparison, and you bet it did it's job longer than that trolley, where the toddler will be too tall for after a while. And yes, it sounds incel, but I agree, it's mostly the women pushing this. Not all, though. Consider yourself happy if you found one who isn't like this. Otherwise: Lord have mercy on your bank account.
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No. 81947 Kontra
>>81936
>Verl/Hof/Tuttlingen instead of Hamburg/Munich/Cologne, and thus won't have it. It's not like they ever visit the opera, it just makes them feel less important to live were there is no opera. A status-symbol, really, meaningless, useless and costly.

The general experience of living in Verl or in Cologne is vastly different, you can turn it into a status symbol thing but maybe it's just a feeling. I wouldn't want to live in Verl I might have driven through it some years ago btw. To some people, it makes a difference to drive an hour into the big town to see the opera or just take the tram/subway to get there. I'd prefer the latter. Small towns are simply boring to me and quiet corners can be found in every big city. Of course if you live next to an Ausfallstraße it's terrible if that is your perspective for the rest of your life but a little street neighboring a bigger two lane one is already quite quiet. Since cities are car-centric but they don't have to be there even would be the possibility to further reduce noise pollution for more people.
In the end most people of the German population don't live in big cities like Cologne or Berlin, so I'm not sure of much of a general phenomenon that should be or if you just have a warped perception (hence the incel tone?)
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No. 81948 Kontra
>>81947
And I want to add: villages and small cities can easily have a big traffic volume on some roads, all cars, and people who live next to it are basically similarly fucked as people in big cities living next to big roads.
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No. 81949
>>81941
>woe to you
Furniture shopping gets old once your whole apartment is full of sofas.
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No. 81950
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Alright, time to chime in as an actual Dorfkind.
I grew up in a village in the asscrack of the world with a population of about 800.
We got DSL in 2006, and it was only DSL "lite", i.e. 384kbps, but at least it wasn't dial-up anymore.
I think in 2016 or so they finally managed to lay down some glass fiber.
Mobile reception is similar. In other countries you are kilometers deep in the forest and still have at least 3G, where for example in the house I grew up in you sometimes have no reception at all. My in-laws live in a hole that gives you Edge, if you get any reception at all.

Also, public transport is abysmal, connections are absolute shit and in my village, after the school time morning bus they only stop there every two hours, which is why I had to walk home from the neighboring village after school. And we are talking of a time factor of 3 or so going by car vs. going by bus IF the connection exists (and forget trams, they don't exist), which is the reason why everyone has a car and gets irritated when wfh city people tell them to use public transport.

Also, the roads are often in a really bad condition. Infrastructure is generally a problem in Germany outside of the big cities.

And housing isn't even that cheap anymore.

That said, it's not as bad as 15k town Ernst makes it out to be. General practicioners are there (albeit constantly besieged by old people), shops are also there, just not in every village. At least my home village still has a bakery. If I want to get groceries, I go to the supermarket two villages further, which means either 15 min by car or a one hour walk.
Of course for anything more special you need to go to an actual city, though the homogenization of shopping possibilities there is also rampant (i.e. less smaller shops and all chains in a mall).
The cultural possibilities are, of course, not as manifold as in an actual city, but depending on what you enjoy, you won't miss out on much, as there are still enough theaters and concerts, just nothing of world renown (though depending on where you live in Germany that might also be hard to come by, even in bigger cities). But people still find enough opportunities and reason to celebrate and have fairs.

As for the people, well, there's always assholes. If you grow up in a village you might get simply stuck there and stay, well, limited, in the sense of the word. On the other hand, people know each other, and if you're not some city slicker overpaying for a house in the village and then telling them how to do things instead of trying to integrate (true story btw), people will accept you pretty quickly. And something I noticed in city people is a certain degree of arrogance, as if by virtue of living in a concrete shithole they're suddenly better than people living in a regular dirt shithole.

I certainly prefer living in the countryside to living in the city, because as the other Ernst said, I want to have nature around me, not shit, piss and people. Pic related is what I can observe from my balcony.
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No. 81971
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It's complicated. People here get stuck in villages, if they own some land they can half live off selling produce in the market and half from subsidies.

There isn't much to do besides light drugs and unprotected sex.
Cultural activities limited to church and getting drunk at Saints festivities. Cafés/Bars are the cultural backbone of society, bonus points if it's legally a sports/hunting/other association.
I've lived my whole life in a village, ~40 people.
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No. 81977 Kontra
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>>81971
Pic rel: Westernmost Europe
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No. 81979 Kontra
>>81971
>>81977
What a nice place, great picture. What sits on top of that hill? What animals are hunted?
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No. 81980 Kontra
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>>81979
>What sits on top of that hill?
Pena palace. Picture taken from a field slightly to the left of pic rel.
>What animals are hunted?
Hares and birds, no large game hunting.
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No. 81985 Kontra
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>>81980
>I suffer living in paradise, relaxing in the shade of a palace.
Anyways, pretty ebic. Was hoping for some exotic large animal huntings. Nothing wrong with hares and birds though.
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No. 81990
>>81985
What exotic animals could there even be in Portugal? Are ibexes already exotic to you?
That said, I really have no idea what runs around in Portugal. Probably nothing too far away from central Europe.
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No. 81991 Kontra
>>81990
>What exotic animals could there even be in Portugal? Are ibexes already exotic to you?
Well there you go. Yes they are exotic. Even wild boars are exotic to me even though they exist here. But they're so rare that I've never seen one in the wild.
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No. 81992
>>81991
Wild boar? Really? In Germany they'll probably soon be declared an actual pest, but I refuse to believe they're "rare" in Finland.
Maybe they're just elusive?
Also, to a Portuguese (and me, too) a moose is pretty exotic, as are bears.
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No. 81997 Kontra
>>81992
Yeah they are. Approx hunting statistics for a year: 100 wild boars, 200 bears... 50 000 moose.
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No. 81998
>>81997
Huh, I just looked it up myself and it seems they basically stop at Scandinavia.
The more you know.
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No. 82001
>>81992
>In Germany they'll probably soon be declared an actual pest,
They weren't a pest before all the maize growing started. I can't remember anyone complaining about too many boar or roe deer in the nineties. Now, you are likely to stumble over them when you just take a walk.

>>81992
>a moose is pretty exotic, as are bears.
Indeed. Fennoskandia is an alien and exotic place. From where I live, Helsinki is as far away as Tunis.
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No. 82005
>>81985
>I suffer living in social democratic paradise, relaxing in the shade of a peat bog.
Also, there is boar here but not in my area.
You don't understand how deep our suffering is, Finns are simply incapable of experiencing the full span of human emotion.
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No. 82006
>>82001
>From where I live, Helsinki is as far away as Tunis.
For me it's equivalent to Lagos, Nigeria but I feel like Finns are more alien that the Igbo people. What do Finns even think about?
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No. 82009 Kontra
>>82006
Rallying and Sauna, probably.
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No. 82010
>>82001
>They weren't a pest before all the maize growing started. I can't remember anyone complaining about too many boar or roe deer in the nineties.
Is that so? Corn has been rather widespread here since the 70s. The african swine flu certainly plays a role here, though, as wild boar are the main vector of spreading it throughout Europe.
And roe deer haven't really changed, but due to certain political developments they are being considered more and more of a (perceived) annoyance/pest.

Probably has also to do with humans spreading further and further, so obviously the animals' room gets smaller while "conflict zones" get larger, or more frequent.
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No. 82011 Kontra
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>>82009
Rallying is very cool. I think the first time I saw a Finnish flag was in a rally car. See, Finnish "suffering" rural people can afford to do these things. They have broad expanses of snow and trees to go 'prrrt :DD prrrt :DD' in their cars.

Not us, we genuinely suffer.
but there is a lively motorcross scene
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No. 82021
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>>82011
>Not us, we genuinely suffer.
Come again?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_lQk_3RIs0
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No. 82023 Kontra
>>82021
It's all foreigners driving. We are suffering too much to have rally drivers!
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No. 82034
>>82010
>Is that so?
I think so. Maize is harvested pretty late in autumn and the wild boar can use that to fatten themselves up.

>Probably has also to do with humans spreading further and further
I observe the opposite. More and more paths fall out of use and vanish, people only use the forestry roads. I think there are now much more places where only hunters and wood cutters go.

>political developments
I don't get what you are alluding to.
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No. 82035 Kontra
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>>82005
Let me fix your quote, dear palacegarch:
>I suffer living in an uninhabitable frozen shithole swamp island with a oppressive gommunist government

>You don't understand how deep our suffering is
It's like a king complaining about the cake being too sweet when the serfs are starving... You bastard...
>Finns are simply incapable of experiencing the full span of human emotion.
:---D
>>82006
>For me it's equivalent to Lagos, Nigeria but I feel like Finns are more alien that the Igbo people. What do Finns even think about?
Cease your investigations. This is your final warning.

>>82009
:DDD I've spent most of this weekend playing Dirt 2.0...

>>82011
>Waah waah rally so cool check your rallying privilege
You'll never know the suffering of getting your car stuck in the snow while rally driving on remote forest roads. Or being late to work because you took a turn a bit too fast with handbrake and are now stuck in a ditch or a snow embankment sideways.
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No. 82037
>>82034
>Maize is harvested pretty late in autumn and the wild boar can use that to fatten themselves up.
Just like beech and oak nuts, but corn is pretty easy to come by.

>More and more paths fall out of use and vanish, people only use the forestry roads.
That's not what I meant. I meant literally humans occupying a bigger area, thus leaving less area for the animals.

>I don't get what you are alluding to.
Waldstrategie 2050
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No. 82038
>>82011
>See, Finnish "suffering" rural people can afford to do these thing
Might be as cheap as an old beater and petrol.
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No. 82040
>>82037
>Waldstrategie 2050
Ah, clicked.

>meant literally humans occupying a bigger area, thus leaving less area for the animals.
True. Every decade, they develop a new area, but population remains constant and uninhabited houses in the village center fall into disrepair.
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No. 82057
>>82038
Actual Rallye is costly albeit I can imagine it is cheaper in eastern Europe than in Germany, yet Rally is a freaking expensive hobby and you better are a mechanic yourself or born wealthy sort of I think.
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No. 82058 Kontra
>>82057
Finland is not Eastern Europe. Also rally driving is a bit like cooking. You don't have to be a professional cook to make a decent meal. Just like you don't have to be a professional rally driver to have fun driving on dirt or snowy roads way too fast, beating your previous time record.
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No. 82069 Kontra
>>82058
>Finland is not Eastern Europe
Your country borders Russia. I have terrible news.
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No. 82072
>>82058
I can only imagine how it works that you have a track on your own that has to be secured and such. This costs money, doesn't it? An event has to be organized and afaik the viewers don't pay for this, so people have to pay to participate, have to get their car there and pay fuel, pay for the car/maintanance, pay for accomodation. In sum this costs quite a bit and thus I deem it a costly hobby. I've seen videos from eastern European countries where the cars come closer to an old beater. On the other hand you have guys like Prospeed from Bulgaria that build a full-on Audi Quattro S1 clone.
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No. 82081 Kontra
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>>82069
>Your country borders Russia. I have terrible news.
Breaking News: Norwegian Adidas stores looted overnight.

>>82072
Makes me wonder if you read my post. Anyways, indeed rallying becomes expensive if you want to race other people. But there are plenty of hobbyist rally groups that drive with complete 1€ shitboxes, and those who spend hundreds of thousands a year on it. Thought most of Finnish rallying is done illegally on public roads with normal cars.
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No. 82113
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>>81936

>The problem is the wife, who will feel like a loser telling her schoolfriends that she lives in Verl/Hof/Tuttlingen instead of Hamburg/Munich/Cologne, and thus won't have it.
I absolute hate this kind of behavior. Living in free space without the bydlos of the city is beautiful.

>>81938
to be fair this is always a problem outside big cities. The point here is if you live in the suburbs of the big city, or the countryside, you will still have to drive to those places, and deal with the same problems. In an trade between driving more time, or dealing with the suburbs life.

>>81948
the problem with high traffic it really depends with the location of the countryside respect the closest big town around. For example where our farm is located theres barely any traffic and getting to the big city takes no longer than 25min of driving, which is nice. In the south, the cities near tourists places, are still countryside but the traffic is absolute awful it ruins the whole experience.

>>81950
that description of the "shitty village" sounds identical at the place where our city house is now located, on how the place was like 15 years behind other cities around. Also that view is really beatiful.

>>81971
>>81977
here only the extreme north/south places have villages with such a low population because how hard is to make new settlements in these extreme conditions. That place really looks like center Chile.

>>81990
>>81991
>>81992
>>82001
here we dont even get wild animals. All the ones who used to live died because farmers or because our depredatory forestry industry which killed all native life. You can see some kind of foxes, wild cats and kind of deers inside reservations
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No. 82115
>>82072
It is Finland. I expect something like this: Jonne (15) spents too much time on CS-GO. His father Pekka (34) decides to get an old beater for 200€, adds in a "safety cage" welded together on the quick, puts a fire extinguisher on the back seat and tells the young man to have at it on the back roads, so he can learn something for life.
Not like gay Sweden where teens only drive A-Tractors.
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No. 82117
>>82081
Present me real 1€ shitbox rally material because all I have seen so far is rather professionally organized events (I don't mean WRC) on Youtube.
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No. 82119 Kontra
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>>82115
>It is Finland. I expect something like this: Jonne (15) spents too much time on CS-GO. His father Pekka (34) decides to get an old beater for 200€, adds in a "safety cage" welded together on the quick, puts a fire extinguisher on the back seat and tells the young man to have at it on the back roads, so he can learn something for life.
It started out well, but you can forget anything past buying the 200€ beater. And it's off to the races.

>>82117
Essentially this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zz49QeWLUkw

Though usually there's no one filming and the driver might've been drunk prior to dying in the crash.
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No. 82121 Kontra
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>>82119
ebin/ebin video
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No. 82122 Kontra
>>82117
My bad, didn't check the context. I don't remember the correct terms so I can't find the shitbox series right now. Maybe this is close enough, not pure rally though:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J6rrF_wbI10
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No. 82123 Kontra
348 kB, 746 × 487
>>82120
This is such bullshit that Germs can buy serviceable cars at such low prices. Pic rel, cheapest working vehicle. Germans should pay thousands of euros for a beater, think of the pollution costs and risk to human life that simple Germans being able to afford these so-called 'Volkswagens'.
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No. 82124 Kontra
>>82120
My point is not that you can buy a car for cheap. That was never denied.

>>82122
Yeah that doesn't count, since you already that it is not really rally and I agree. These are also indeed cheaper to attend etc.

>>82119
Welp, guess finlan landscape is made for lonely rally jonnes. That's how a Toivonen is borned :DDD
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No. 82125 Kontra
>>82124
>Yeah that doesn't count, since you already that it is not really rally and I agree. These are also indeed cheaper to attend etc.
True. Feel free to search for it. You'll find it eventually :D
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No. 82126 Kontra
338 kB, 761 × 479
>>82123
Closer inspection of the description led me to see that "the car has no papers".

350€ is what a serviceable car costs here.
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No. 82127 Kontra
204 kB, 854 × 480, 0:02
>>82126
Ebin car, I want to drive it. Prrt :DD prrt :DDDD
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No. 82128
792 kB, 1337 × 807
>>82123

here soviet Ladas are also the cheapest running cars you can buy (500000 are close to 500USD here)
you can also buy some old nissan/VW from the 80s with no parts available for that price
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No. 83629
No country has managed to reverse or even stop rural exodus and the death of the countryside. Urbanization is such an absolute and scary phenomenon, no culture has managed to avoid it.
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No. 83639
296 Bytes, 17 × 18
>>83629
Nonsense, the Khmer Rouge managed it with aplomb!